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3,4-Diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP)33,4-Diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP)3,4-Diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP)EnglishPharmacyNANANervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-02-09T05:00:00ZJennifer Drynan-Arsenault, BSc, RPh, ACPRsusan.ball@sickkids.ca | Susan Ball | 693A30232E777C7369636B6B6964735C737573616E2062616C6C i:0#.w|sickkids\susan ball69.00000000000007.00000000000000791.000000000000noneDrugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called 3, 4-diaminopyridine. This information sheet explains what 3, 4 diaminopyridine does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called 3,4-diaminopyridine. This information sheet explains what 3,4-diaminopyridine does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child this medicine?</h2><p>Follow these instructions when you give your child 3,4-DAP:</p><ul><li>Give your child 3,4-DAP exactly as your doctor or your pharmacist tells you. </li><li>Have your child take 3,4-DAP with ​food or milk if the medicine causes an upset stomach. </li><li>3,4-DAP is made into capsules which your child should try to swallow whole. </li></ul><p>If your child cannot take the capsule whole, you must follow the instructions below:</p><ol><li>Work in an area with no drafts and without a lot of activity. Place a large clear plastic bag on a flat surface. Place a small cup containing a small amount of soft food inside the bag. </li><li>Wear disposable gloves that allow you to work with your fingers inside the plastic bag.</li><li>Open the capsule inside the plastic bag.</li><li>Mix the contents of the capsule with the food.</li><li>Give all the medicine mixture to your child.</li><li>Remove the gloves and wash your hands with soap and water.<br></li></ol>​<h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2><p>If your child misses a dose of 3,4-DAP:</p><ul><li>​Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li><li>Give your child the next dose no sooner than 4 hours after the last dose. </li><li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li> </ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of this medicine?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take 3,4-DAP. But usually your child will not n​eed to s​ee a doctor about them. </p><p>These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to 3,4-DAP. Call your child's contact nurse or doctor if your child has any of these signs, or symptoms, and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul> <li>stomach upset </li><li>trouble falling asleep </li><li>extra salivation (spit) </li><li>dizziness, light head </li><li>extra sweating </li><li>eyes sensitive to the sun </li><li>numbness around the mouth or fingertips </li></ul><h3>Most of these side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these signs: </h3><ul><li>seizures </li><li>confusion </li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about this medicine?</h2><ul><li>Other medicines may not work well with 3,4-DAP. Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicines, even medicines that you can buy without a doctor's order (prescription). </li><li>Most people taking 3,4-DAP feel a tingling sensation in their fingers or?toes or around the mouth after taking a dose. You don't need to call your child's doctor about this. </li><li>If you get any 3,4-DAP on your clothing, remove your clothes and wash them as soon as possible.</li><li>3,4-DAP has not been licensed for use in Canada and has been supplied just for your child. Make sure you have enough 3,4-DAP for weekends and holidays. Call your pharmacy for a new supply one week before you will run out.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
ASA (Acetylsalicylic Acid)AASA (Acetylsalicylic Acid)ASA (Acetylsalicylic Acid)EnglishPharmacyNANACardiovascular system;Immune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-05-27T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh66.00000000000008.00000000000000910.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called ASA (Acetylsalicylic Acid). This information sheet explains what ASA does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.<br></p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called ASA (acetylsalicylic acid, say: a-SEE-ta-sal-a-si-lik). This information sheet explains what ASA does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child ASA?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child ASA.</p> <ul><li>Give your child ASA regularly, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. Avoid missing doses by giving your child ASA at the same time each day. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving ASA for any reason. </li> <li>Make sure you have enough ASA to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. </li> <li>Give your child ASA with food or milk so their stomach does not become upset. </li> <li>If your child is taking the regular tablets or children's Aspirin, they may be swallowed whole, crushed, or chewed. Make sure your child drinks a glass of water or milk after taking the ASA. </li> <li>If your child is taking the enteric-coated ASA, the tablets should be swallowed whole with a glass of water, not crushed or chewed. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of ASA?</h2> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. </li> <li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of ASA?</h2> <p>Your child may have some side effects while they take ASA. Usually your child will not need to see a doctor about them.</p> <p>These mild side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to ASA. Check with your child's doctor, and follow their instructions if your child has any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>a rash or itchy skin </li> <li>mild stomach cramps (usually happens shortly after taking a dose) </li> <li>upset stomach or throwing up </li></ul> <p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </p> <ul><li>severe or lasting stomach pain </li> <li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>difficulty breathing </li> <li>severe sweating </li> <li>problems seeing, blurred vision </li> <li>dizziness </li> <li>ringing in the ears, trouble hearing </li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about ASA?</h2><ul><li>Before starting ASA, tell your child’s doctor if your child has ever had asthma. Also tell your child’s doctor and pharmacist if your child has ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to ASA or any other medicines.</li><li>Tell your child’s doctor if your child has ever had bleeding from the stomach or frequent stomach aches.</li><li>ASA should not usually be given to a child with a fever who has a viral illness such as chickenpox or flu (influenza). Check with your child’s doctor before giving ASA if your child seems to be coming down with a virus. The doctor may tell you to change the amount of ASA that you give your child.</li><li>Check with your child’s doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicines, even medicines that you can buy without a doctor’s order (prescription), such as cough medicines. Ask your doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any herbal products because they can increase or decrease your child’s response to ASA.</li><li>Before your child has any kind of surgery, even on the teeth, or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking ASA. If they tell you to stop the ASA, speak to your child’s doctor or dentist about when is the right time to start taking ASA again.</li><li>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor’s office and for blood tests, so that the doctor can check your child’s reaction to ASA.</li><li>Keep this medicine at room temperature. Keep it away from damp places, such as the bathroom or the kitchen sink.</li><li>Do not give your child any ASA that has changed color or that smells of vinegar. Ask your pharmacist about how to throw away any ASA that has gone bad or is out of date.</li><li>Throw away any ASA that is out of date.</li></ul><br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AcetaminophenAAcetaminophenAcetaminophenEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh53.00000000000009.00000000000000832.000000000000n/aDrugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called acetaminophen (Tylenol or Tempra). This information sheet explains what acetaminophen does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called acetaminophen (say: a-seet-a-MIN-oh-fen). This information sheet explains what acetaminophen does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Giving acetaminophen to your child</h2><p> <strong>Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has:</strong> </p><ul><li>liver disease</li><li>severe kidney problems</li><li>phenylketonuria</li><li>an allergy to acetaminophen</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child acetaminophen?</h2><ul><li>Give your child acetaminophen exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you.</li><li>Give your child only as much acetaminophen as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, or what is written on the package label. Too much acetaminophen can harm your child.</li><li>Give your child no more than 5 doses of acetaminophen in 24 hours. Give the doses at least 4 hours apart.</li><li>Give acetaminophen with food if it upsets the stomach.</li><li>If your child is taking liquid acetaminophen, use the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you to measure the dose correctly.</li></ul><p>If your child needs an acetaminophen suppository (medicine that goes into the rectum), please see the Suppository Instructions sheet for directions on how to give a suppository.</p><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2><ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li><li>If it is almost time for next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li><li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose.</li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of acetaminophen?</h2><p>Acetaminophen rarely causes side effects with normal use.</p><p>If you are worried that you may have given your child too much acetaminophen, call your doctor or pharmacist.</p><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be signs of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the nearest Emergency Dapartment if your child has any of these side effects:</h3><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a></li><li>loss of appetite​</li><li>stomach pain or cramps </li><li>skin rash, <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">hives</a>, or itching</li><li>swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat </li><li>increased sweating</li><li>yellow eyes or skin</li></ul>​<h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using acetaminophen?</h2><p>If you are giving your child acetaminophen for pain, call your doctor if the pain gets worse, if new pain occurs, or if the painful area is red or swollen.</p><p>If you are giving your child acetaminophen for fever, call your doctor if the fever lasts more than 2 days, if the fever gets worse, or if there are any signs of redness or swelling.</p><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products).</p><p>Some other medicines may also contain acetaminophen. Always check the ingredients, or ask a pharmacist, before giving these medicines to your child to prevent your child from getting too much acetaminophen.​​</p><h2>What other important information should you know about acetaminophen?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Many different types and strengths of acetaminophen are available. Be sure to check the appropriate dosing instructions for your child's age and weight. If you are unsure of the correct dose, check with your child's doctor or pharmacist. </li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Keep acetaminophen at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way throw out outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AcetazolamideAAcetazolamideAcetazolamideEnglishPharmacyNAEyesNervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-15T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh58.00000000000008.00000000000000761.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called acetazolamide. This information sheet explains what acetazolamide does, how to take it, and what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called acetazolamide (say: a-set-a-ZOLE-a-mide). This information sheet explains what acetazolamide does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should I give my child acetazolamide?</h2><ul><li>Avoid missing doses by giving your child the medicine at the same times every day. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving your child this medicine for any reason. Make sure you have enough medicine on hand to last through weekends, holidays, or vacations. </li><li>With food to reduce the chance of an upset stomach </li><li>With the special spoon or syringe the pharmacist gave you, if your child is taking the liquid form of acetazolamide </li><li>If the dose is more than once a day, give the last dose early in the evening so your child can avoid having to urinate (go to the bathroom) during the night. Acetazolamide can increase the number of times your child will have to urinate. This effect should lessen with time. </li></ul><h2>What should I do if my child misses a dose?</h2><ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li><li>​If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and give your child the next dose at the regular time.</li><li>Give your child only one dose at a time.</li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of acetazolamide?</h2><p>Call your doctor if your child continues to have any of these signs, or symptoms:</p><ul><li>Upset stomach, throwing up </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">Headache</a> </li><li>Increased need to urinate </li><li>Loss of appetite </li><li>Taste of metal in the mouth </li><li>Loss of weight </li><li>Watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li><li>Nervousness, irritability </li><li>Touble having a bowel movement (constipation) </li><li>Feeings of numbness, tingling, or burning in the hands, fingers, feet, toes, mouth, lips, tongue, or anus (bum) </li></ul><p>Call your doctor immediately if your child has:</p><ul><li>Any unusual or allergic reactions </li><li>Dark urine </li><li>Shortness of breath or trouble breathing </li><li>Confusion </li><li>Unusual bruising or bleeding </li><li>Yellow skin or eyes </li><li>Clumsiness or unsteadiness </li><li>Blood in the urine or stool </li> <li>​More severe seizures (if your child is taking acetazolamide for a seizure disorder) </li></ul><h2>What other important information should I know about acetazolamide?</h2><ul><li>This medicine may cause your child's body to lose <a href="/Article?contentid=220&language=English">potassium?</a>. This may make your child feel dizzy, light-headed, confused, or more tired than usual. Your child may also have a dry mouth, muscle cramps, or an upset stomach. They may be throwing up or be more thirsty than usual. To prevent these problems, the doctor may want your child to eat or drink foods that contain potassium, such as bananas or orange juice. </li><li>Acetazolamide may make your child's skin more likely to sunburn. Your child must cover up with clothing and a hat or use a strong sunscreen. Look for a sunscreen?that protects against the sun?s UVA and UVB rays, with an SPF of at least 15. Ask your pharmacist to help you pick the right sunscreen. </li><li>Tell your child's doctor if your child has any of these medical problems:</li><ul><li>liver or kidney disease </li><li> <a href="/diabetes">diabetes</a> </li><li>allergies to medicines, especially sulfas or water pills (diuretics) </li></ul><li>Store the liquid form of acetazolamide at room temperature. Shake the bottle well before you use it. Throw away any acetazolamide that is outdated.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AcetylcysteineAAcetylcysteineAcetylcysteineEnglishPharmacyNALungs;LiverLungs;LiverDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-15T04:00:00Z59.00000000000008.000000000000001040.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called acetylcysteine. This information sheet explains what acetylcysteine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called acetylcysteine (say: a-seet-il-SIS-teen). This information sheet explains what acetylcysteine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving acetylcysteine to your child?</h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has an allergy to acetylcysteine. </p><p>Also, talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=785&language=English">Asthma</a> </li><li>Trouble coughing or cannot cough </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child acetylcysteine?</h2><p>Give your child acetylcysteine exactly the way the doctor or pharmacist tells you. Do not use it in larger amounts, and do not use it more often than you are told to by the doctor or pharmacist. </p><p>If your child is <em>inhaling</em> this medicine: </p><ul><li>Your child will breathe this medicine in through a special machine called a nebulizer. You may need to mix the acetylcysteine with other​ medicines, sterile normal saline, or sterile water. </li><li>Do not mix the dose of acetylcysteine until you are ready to use the medication. </li><li>If you are not sure how to use the machine, ask your child's nurse or pharmacist. </li><li>Clean the nebulizer right after each use. The residue can clog parts of the nebulizer. </li></ul><p>If your child is taking this medicine by <em>mouth</em>: </p><ul><li>You may mix acetylcysteine with water, juice, soft drinks or chocolate milk. </li><li>Mix the acetylcysteine right before you are ready to give it to your child. You should use the solution within 1 hour of mixing it. </li></ul><p>If your child is getting this medicine by <em>injection</em>: </p><ul><li>Your child will get this medicine at the hospital. A doctor or nurse will give it by needle into your child's vein. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2><ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li><li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of acetylcysteine?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take acetylcysteine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul><li>Nausea (upset stomach) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">Vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li><li>White patches or sores inside the mouth or on the lips </li></ul><p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English">Hives</a></li> <li>Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat</li><li>Chest tightness</li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using acetylcysteine?</h2><p>If your child is taking acetylcysteine to help with their mucus, give your child plenty of liquids to drink each day, unless your doctor tells you not to. Do not give your child liquids which contain caffeine, such as cola, coffee, or tea. </p><p>Do not mix other medicines in a nebulizer with acetylcysteine, unless your doctor has told you to.</p><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products).​​ </p><p>Acetylcysteine should only be used with certain types of nebulizer machines. Check with your child'​s nurse or pharmacist to make sure you have the right type of machine. </p><p>Your child may have a sticky feeling around the nebulizer mask when inhaling acetylcysteine. This stickiness can be removed with water. </p><p>Your child may sense an unusual or unpleasant smell while using acetylcysteine. This is normal.</p><p>Call your doctor if you believe your child's condition is not getting better, or if it is worse.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about acetylcysteine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Acetylcysteine liquid may change colour once you have opened the bottle. It is still safe to use if this happens.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough acetylcysteine to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>If a pharmacy is making acetylcysteine liquid for your child to take by mouth, it is good for only 2 days in the refrigerator.</li><li>If your child is taking acetylcysteine by mouth or by inhalation, and you are mixing the solution with a beverage or other solution, store the opened acetylcysteine vials in a refrigerator and use them within 4 days. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines. </li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AcyclovirAAcyclovirAcyclovirEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-08-13T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh64.00000000000007.00000000000000785.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">​Your child needs to take the medicine called acyclovir. This information sheet explains what acyclovir does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called acyclovir (say: ay-sye-kloe-veer). This information sheet explains what acyclovir does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving acyclovir to your child</h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has had any unusual or allergic reaction to acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir, or any other medicines in the past. </p><p>Also,talk with the doctor or pharmacist if yo​ur child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p><ul><li>kidney problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child acyclovir?</h2><ul><li>Give your child this medicine by mouth</li><li>For as long as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems well. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving acyclovir for any reason. </li><li>​At the same times every day, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. </li><li>With or without food; give it with food if it makes your child's stomach upset. </li><li>With a glass of water or other liquid. </li><li>It is important for your child to drink plenty of water or other liquid every day, unless they were told to drink less by the doctor. </li><li>If giving the suspension, shake the bottle well before measuring each dose. </li></ul><p>Acyclovir can also be given by a needle into your child's vein. It will be given by a nurse in the hospital clinic or the nursing unit.</p><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2><ul><li>Give the miss​ed dose as soon as you remember. </li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li><li>Give only one dose at a time. </li> </ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of acyclovir?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take acyclovir. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p><ul><li>upset stomach </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> (loose stools) </li><li>mild headache </li><li>dizziness </li></ul><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they ​​may be signs of a serious problem. Call your child'​s doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3><ul><li>problems passing urine or passing less urine than usual </li><li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li><li>confusion </li><li>seizures </li><li>skin rash </li></ul><p>It is important to consult with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines. These include prescription, over the counter, herbal, homeopathic, or natural remedies, supplements, or treatments. Inform your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child takes any other medicines and that your child is taking acyclovir. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about acyclovir?</h2><ul><li>If your child's symptoms do not get better in a few weeks or if they get worse, check with your child's doctor.</li><li>Keep a list of all medicines your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Keep acyclovir at room temperature, away from heat and moisture. Do not store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AdalimumabAAdalimumabAdalimumabEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-01-23T05:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called adalimumab. This information sheet explains what adalimumab does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called adalimumab. This information sheet explains what adalimumab does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.<br></p><h2>Before giving adalimumab to your child </h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child: </p><ul><li>has an allergy to adalimumab or any of the ingredients in the adalimumab injection.</li><li>is scheduled to receive any vaccinations. </li></ul><p>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p><ul><li>a latex allergy.</li><li>an infection (bacterial, fungal, or viral), especially serious infections such as tuberculosis (TB) or hepatitis B.</li><li>congestive heart failure (heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body's needs).</li><li>demyelinating diseases of the nervous system (for example, multiple sclerosis).</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child adalimumab? </h2><p>Your child's first dose of adalimumab will likely be given in the hospital or in clinic. If your child is to receive adalimumab at home, arrangements may be made to have a nurse come into the home to give it. Alternatively, you may be taught by one of the nurses to give your child the subcutaneous (sc) injections (injections under the skin) at home. If you give the injections at home: </p><ul><li>Make sure you understand and are comfortable with the way to prepare and inject adalimumab and know how to dispose of the needle and syringe in a needle/sharps disposal container</li><li>Do not inject adalimumab at the same site. The injection site should be rotated</li> <li>Adalimumab should not be injected at sites that are red, tender, bruised, or hard. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of adalimumab? </h2><ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you re​​member.</li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time.</li><li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does adalimumabtake to work? </h2><p>Some patients see improvements after the​ir first or second dose of adalimumab, however it may take up to 3 months before the full benefit is seen. It is important to stay on track with the dosing schedule even if you see the effects right away. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of adalimumab? </h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take adalimumab. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul><li>Irritation, pain, or redness at the place of injection</li><li>Headache</li></ul><p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. <strong>Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency</strong> if your child has any of these side effects: </p><ul><li>Signs of a life-threatening reaction, including: wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness or chest pain, difficulty breathing, fever, itching, bad cough, blue skin colour, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat</li><li>Rash or hives (red raised spots on the skin), peeling or blisters on the skin</li><li>Signs of an infection, including: fever, chills, generally not feeling well (weak or tired), sore throat, runny nose, cough, and headache</li><li>Numbness or tingling</li><li>Sudden weight gain</li><li>Bruising or bleeding very easily, looking very pale </li></ul>​<h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using adalimumab? </h2><p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with adalimumab or in some cases the dose of adalimumab or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter or herbal) including: </p><ul><li>abatacept (Orencia​)</li><li>anakinra (Kineret)</li><li>Immunosuppressants (for example, <a href="/Article?contentid=244&language=English">tacrolimus</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=115&language=English">cyclosporine</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=195&language=English">mycophenolate</a>, and <a href="/Article?contentid=221&language=English">prednisone</a>)</li><li>Live vaccines (for example, the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, the chicken pox vaccine, and the oral polio vaccine)</li></ul><p>There have been rare cases of cancers in children and teenage patients taking TNF-blocking agents (such as adalimumab). For children taking TNF-blocker medicines, the chances of developing lymphoma or other cancers may increase. Although this risk is higher than the general population, it is still quite low. </p><p>It is important that your child be tested for tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis B to make sure they do not have one of these infections before they receive adalimumab. </p><p>It is also important to make sure that your child's immunizations are up to date before they start therapy with adalimumab. Vaccines may not work as well if they are given to your child while they are being treated with adalimumab, or the vaccine dose may need to be adjusted. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about adalimumab? </h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist. </li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child. </li><li>Make sure you always have enough adalimumab to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep adalimumab in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine. Protect this medicine from light. </li><li>An adalimumab syringe can be stored at room temperature for a maximum of 14 days. Once taken out of the refrigerator for room temperature storage, the adalimumab syringe must be used within 14 days even if it is put back in the refrigerator. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AllopurinolAAllopurinolAllopurinolEnglishPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-11T05:00:00ZJennifer Drynan-Arsenault, BSc, RPh, ACPRRita V. Kutti, BScPhm, RPh57.00000000000008.00000000000000979.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called allopurinol. This information sheet explains what allopurinol does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.<br></p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called allopurinol (say: al-oh-PURE-i-nole). This information sheet explains what allopurinol does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine. <br></p><h2>Before giving allopurinol to your child?</h2><p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to allopurinol or any other medications. </p><p>Also, Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. This medicine may not be right for your child if they: </p><ul><li>has a history of kidney problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child allopurinol?</h2><ul><li>Give your child allopurinol exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. </li><li>You may give the tablets whole. If your child cannot swallow a whole tablet, you may crush the tablets and mix them with some liquid (such as water or fruit juice), or a small amount of food. Alternatively, the liquid form of allopurinol may be used. </li><li>If your child is taking liquid allopurinol, measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li><li>Shake the liquid allopurinol well before you give your child each dose. </li><li>Have your child drink plenty of fluid while taking allopurinol. Your child'​s doctor or nurse will tell you how much fluid your child needs. </li><li>Have your child take allopurinol with food or milk to decrease the chance of stomach upset. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2><ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember.​ </li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li><li>Do not give your child 2 doses to make up for 1 missed dose. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of allopurinol?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take allopurinol. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul><li>upset stomach (nausea) or throwing up (<a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>) </li><li>watery bowel movements (<a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>) </li><li>drowsiness </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a> </li></ul><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3><ul><li>a rash, redness, itchy skin, or hives </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, chills, muscle aches or pains, or sore throat </li><li>blood in the urine or stools </li><li>black, tarry stools </li><li>unusual bruising or bleeding </li><li>difficult or painful urination </li><li>decreased amount of urine </li><li>yellow eyes or skin </li><li>shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or tightness in the chest </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using allopurinol?</h2><ul><li>Allopurinol may affect the way the body handles certain drugs, including 6-<a href="/Article?contentid=182&language=English">mercaptopurine</a> (6MP) and <a href="/Article?contentid=80&language=English">azathioprine</a>. Be sure to tell your doctor or pharmacist if your child is using these medicines. </li><li>Drugs such as diuretics (water pills) may increase the amount of allopurinol in the body. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if your child is using a diuretic, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=144&language=English">furosemide</a>, Lasix, <a href="/Article?contentid=241&language=English">hydrochlorothiazide, Aldactazide, spironolactone</a>, or <a href="/Article?contentid=187&language=English">metolazone</a>. </li><li>The antibiotics <a href="/Article?contentid=73&language=English">amoxicillin</a> (Amoxil) and ampicillin may increase the chance of rash with allopurinol. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if your child is using these medications. </li><li>Allopurinol may also affect the way the body handles blood thinners. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you​r child is using medications such as <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">ASA</a> (Aspirin) or <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> (Coumadin). </li></ul><p>Allopurinol may make your child drowsy or less alert than normal. Watch carefully when your child is doing something that they need to be alert for, such as climbing stairs. </p><p>Do not give your child anything that may make the urine more acidic. For example, taking too much vitamin C may make the urine more acidic and increase the possibility of kidney stones forming while taking allopurinol. </p><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, or herbal products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about allopurinol?</h2><ul><li>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check your child's reaction to allopurinol.</li><li>Allopurinol liquid must be made by a pharmacy. Make sure your pharmacy is able to make it for your child.</li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on to show the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough allopurinol to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Store allopurinol tablets and liquid at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmantadineAAmantadineAmantadineEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh62.00000000000008.00000000000000760.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amantadine. This information sheet explains what amantadine does, how to take it, and what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amantadine (say: a-MAN-ta-deen). This information sheet explains what amantadine does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving amantadine to your child<br></h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child is allergic to amantadine or any component of the medication.</p><h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. This medicine may not be right for your child if they have:</h3><ul><li>heart disease</li><li>liver disease</li><li>kidney disease </li><li>seizures </li><li>glaucoma (eye condition) </li><li>eczematoid dermatitis (skin condition)</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child amantadine?</h2><p>Follow these instructions when you give your child amantadine:</p><ul><li>Give your child amantadine exactly as your doctor or your pharmacist (druggist) tells you to, even if your child seems better. </li><li>Give your child amantadine for as long as your doctor orders. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. </li><li>Give your child amantadine at the same times every day. Doses should be at least 12 hours apart. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li><li>Have your child take amantadine with food or milk so their stomach does not become upset.</li><li>Shake the bottle well before you give your child the medicine, if your child is taking liquid amantadine.</li><li>Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you.</li><li>You may mix liquid amantadine with a small amount of water or milk.</li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of amantadine?</h2><p>If your child misses a dose of amantadine:</p><ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose.</li><li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time. Wait at least 12 hours between doses. </li><li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of amantadine?</h2><p>Your child may have some side effects while they take amantadine. Usually your child will not need to see a doctor about them. These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to amantadine. </p><p>Check with your child's doctor if your child has any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul><li>drowsiness​ </li><li>constipation </li><li>headache </li><li>dry mouth, nose, and throat </li><li>confusion </li><li>upset stomach </li><li>difficulty falling asleep </li><li>dizziness, especially when standing up quickly</li></ul><p>Call your child's doctor or nurse as soon as possible, during office hours, if your child has any of these signs:</p><ul><li>mood changes </li><li>difficulty peeing, or urinating </li></ul><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3><ul><li>swollen feet or legs</li><li>seizures </li><li>fainting </li><li>vision changes </li><li>hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not really there)</li><li>rash (eczema, or purple blotchy spots) </li><li>muscle rigidity, irregular heartbeat, high fever<br></li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about amantadine?</h2><ul><li>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicines, even medicines that you can buy without a doctor's order (prescription). </li><li>If your child has difficulty sleeping while taking amantadine, give them the evening dose several hours before bedtime.</li><li>If your child has a dry mouth from taking amantadine, give them lots of small glasses of water, ice chips, or sugarless hard candy. </li><li>Amantadine may cause your child to be dizzy or less alert. Have your child avoid activities that require them to be alert (for example riding a bicycle, rollerblading, contact sports). School work may be more difficult for your child to focus on so tell your child's teacher that they are taking this medicine.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Aminoglycosides (Amikacin, Gentamicin, and Tobramycin)AAminoglycosides (Amikacin, Gentamicin, and Tobramycin)Aminoglycosides (Amikacin, Gentamicin, and Tobramycin)EnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh50.000000000000010.0000000000000827.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take a medicine called an aminoglycoside. This information sheet explains what aminoglycosides do and how they are given to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take a medicine called an aminoglycoside (say: a-MEE-noe-GLYE-koe-side). This information sheet explains what aminoglycosides do and how they are given to your child. It also explains what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before aminoglycosides are given to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has had an unusual or allergic reaction to an aminoglycoside antibiotic or any other medicine. </p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with these medicines if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>any kidney problems </li> <li>any problems with their sense of balance and/or hearing </li> <li>myasthenia gravis, an immune disease that causes severe muscle weakness </li></ul><h2>How are aminoglycosides given to your child?</h2> <ul><li>A nurse will give the aminoglycoside by needle into your child's vein (intravenously) in the hospital. If your child has a central venous catheter (port, PICC, CVC, central line), the aminoglycoside will likely be given through this catheter. If your child gets this medicine at home, a nurse will come to your home to give it. </li> <li>Aminoglycoside antibiotics may be given once a day (every 24 hours) or several times a day (for example, every 8 or 12 hours). Sometimes they are given only every day and a half (every 36 hours) or even less often (once every 2 or more days). </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of aminoglycosides?</h2> <p>Your child may have some side effects while they receive an aminoglycoside. Some side effects are more likely to occur in premature and newborn babies. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>upset stomach </li> <li>throwing up </li> <li>loss of appetite </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. These side effects may occur even after your child has completed treatment. Let your child's doctor or nurse know as soon as possible if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>loss of hearing </li> <li>ringing or buzzing in the ears </li> <li>feeling of fullness of the ears </li> <li>increased thirst </li> <li>needing to urinate more or less frequently than usual </li> <li>skin rash or itchiness </li> <li>unusual drowsiness, dizziness, or weakness </li> <li>clumsiness or unsteadiness </li></ul> <h3>Some possible side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away, or if you are at home, take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>muscle twitching </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>difficulty breathing </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using aminoglycosides?</h2> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about aminoglycosides?</h2><ul><li>Your child will need regular blood tests while they are receiving an aminoglycoside. Some of these blood tests will be used to make sure that the aminoglycoside dose is right for your child. Other tests will be used to see if your child's kidneys are being affected by the aminoglycoside. If your child is getting an aminoglycoside at home, keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check your child's reaction to the aminoglycoside. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmiodaroneAAmiodaroneAmiodaroneEnglishPharmacyNANAHeartDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh58.00000000000008.000000000000001142.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amiodarone. This information sheet explains what amiodarone does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amiodarone (say: a-MEE-oh-da-rone). This information sheet explains what amiodarone does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving amiodarone to your child<br></h2><p>Tell your doctor if your child has:</p><ul><li>an allergy to amiodarone </li><li>a slow heartbeat not controlled by a pacemaker </li></ul><h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3><ul><li>a low heartbeat </li><li>liver disease </li><li>thyroid problems </li><li>lung problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child amiodarone?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child amiodarone:</p> <ul><li>Give your child amiodarone exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you to, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you change the dose or stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your child may become ill if they stop taking this medicine suddenly. </li> <li>Give amiodarone at the same times every day. Make sure you leave the same amount of time between doses. </li> <li>Give with or without food. Give it with food if it upsets the stomach. </li> <li>Do not give your child grapefruit juice or other grapefruit products. </li> <li>Amiodarone can also be given as an injection (needle) into your child's vein. This injection is given at the hospital. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose?</h2> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does amiodarone take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several weeks after starting amiodarone before your child feels better.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of amiodarone?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amiodarone. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p><ul><li>dizziness </li><li>headache </li><li>weakness, reduced alertness, feeling unsteady or clumsy </li><li>constipation </li><li>loss of appetite </li><li>nausea and vomiting </li><li>bitter or metallic taste in mouth </li><li>flushing of the face </li></ul><p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p><ul><li>unexplained low fever </li><li>trembling, shaking, or unusual movements of the body </li><li>numbness or tingling in fingers or toes </li><li>changes in heartbeat (fast or irregular) </li></ul><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3><ul><li>a cough that does not go away, painful breathing or shortness of breath </li><li>severe nausea and vomiting or stomach pain </li><li>yellowing of the eyes or skin </li><li>fainting, severe weakness, or chest pain </li></ul><h3>After your child stops taking amiodarone, it may still cause some side effects that need attention. During this period of time, check with your doctor as soon as possible if your child has the following side effects: </h3><ul><li>a cough that does not go away </li><li>painful breathing<br></li><li>shortness of breath </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using amiodarone?</h2><p>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check your child's reaction to amiodarone.</p><p>Your child's doctor will order blood tests to check for problems with the liver and thyroid.</p><p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with amiodarone. In some cases, the dose of amiodarone or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if your child is also taking any of the following medicines: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> (Coumadin®) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=124&language=English">digoxin</a> (Lanoxin®) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=216&language=English">phenytoin</a> (Dilantin®) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=115&language=English">cyclosporine</a> </li> <li>other heart medications (e.g., <a href="/Article?contentid=228&language=English">quinidine</a>, procainamide, flecainide) </li><li>certain antibiotics or antifungal medications </li></ul><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><p>Amiodarone may sometimes affect eyesight. Check with your doctor if there are any changes in your child's vision. Keep any eye appointments that your doctor makes to have your child's eyes checked. </p><p>Before your child has any surgery, including dental surgery or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking amiodarone. </p><p>Amiodarone may make your child's skin more likely to sunburn, even after they stop taking amiodarone. To help prevent sunburn:</p><ul><li>Avoid direct sunlight for long periods of time. </li><li>When outside, cover your child with clothing and a hat. </li><li>Apply a sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. </li><li>Avoid sunlamps, bright indoor lights, and tanning beds. </li></ul><p>After your child has taken this medicine for a long time, amiodarone may cause the skin to turn a blue-gray colour (especially areas where the skin is exposed to the sun). This colour will usually fade after amiodarone is stopped, but it may take several months. Tell your doctor if this happens. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about amiodarone?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Amiodarone capsules must be made by a pharmacy. If your child is taking amiodarone capsules, make sure your pharmacy is able to make them. </li><li>Make sure you always have enough amiodarone to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep amiodarone at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmitriptylineAAmitriptylineAmitriptylineEnglishPharmacyNANABrainDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2014-01-03T05:00:00ZJennifer Chen, RPh59.00000000000008.000000000000001069.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amitriptyline. This information sheet explains what amitriptyline does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amitriptyline (say: Am-i-TRIP-ta-leen). This information sheet explains what amitriptyline does, how to give it and what side effects your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving amitriptyline to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's health care provider if your child is:</p> <ul><li> allergic to amitriptyline or other medicines </li> <li> taking thioridazine or other medicines in the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) drug class </li> <li> recovering from acute heart failure </li></ul> <h3>Talk to your child's health care provider if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has:</h3> <ul><li> mental health issues such as thoughts of suicide, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia </li> <li> heart problems </li> <li> increased pressure in the eye </li> <li> hyperthyroidism </li> <li> liver disease </li> <li> a history of seizures </li> <li> difficulty passing urine </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child amitriptyline?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child amitriptyline:</p> <ul><li> Give your child this medicine exactly as your child's health care provider has instructed, even if your child seems better. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your child may have side effects if they stop taking this medicine suddenly. </li> <li>Do not increase or decrease the amount of medicine without speaking with your child's prescriber first. </li> <li>Give amitriptyline one hour before bedtime or as instructed by your child's health care provider. </li> <li>Amitriptyline can be given with or without food. Give it with food if it causes an upset stomach. </li> <li>If your child has trouble swallowing the tablet whole, you may crush the tablet and mix it with a small amount of food, water or juice. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of amitriptyline?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does amitriptyline take to work?</h2> <ul><li> Your child may start feeling better a few weeks after starting this drug, but it may take up to six weeks to see the full effect. </li> <li>Sometimes it is necessary to increase the dose to have an effect. Discuss with your child's health care provider. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of amitriptyline?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amitriptyline. Check with your child's health care provider if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child:</p> <ul><li> drowsiness </li> <li> dizziness </li> <li> blurry vision </li> <li> trouble having a bowel movement </li> <li> dry mouth </li> <li> weight gain </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the nearest emergency department if your child experiences any of these side effects:</h3> <ul><li> Sudden trouble in swallowing or breathing, including shortness of breath. </li> <li>Swelling of the face, tongue or lips. </li> <li>Unusual behaviour, such as increased agitation, hostility or thoughts of self-harm or harm to others. If this happens, call your child's doctor immediately, but do not stop amitriptyline on your own. </li> <li>Any changes in heartbeat, such as fast, slow or irregular heartbeat. </li> <li>Seizures. </li> <li>Yellow eyes or skin. </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you taken when your child is using amitriptyline?</h2> <ul><li> Amitriptyline can make some existing heart rhythm problems worse. Your child's doctor may order an <a href="/Article?contentid=1276&language=English">electrocardiogram</a> (ECG) to check your child's heart rhythm. </li> <li>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with amitriptyline; the dose of amitriptyline or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important to tell your child's health care providers if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter or herbal). These may include MAOIs, <a href="/Article?contentid=101&language=English">cisapride</a>, linezolid, <a href="/Article?contentid=139&language=English">fluconazole</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=131&language=English">erythromycin</a>, anti-retrovirals, <a href="/Article?contentid=123&language=English">diazepam</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=236&language=English">SSRIs</a> and migraine medications. </li> <li>This medicine may cause your child to be less alert. Watch your child's activities closely until you see how amitriptyline affects them. You may also have your child avoid tasks that require alertness, such as riding a bicycle, driving or contact sports. </li> <li>Your child may get sunburned more easily. Avoid lots of sun, sunlamps and tanning beds. Use sunscreen, dress your child in protective clothing and encourage them to wear sunglasses. </li> <li>Do not stop giving your child amitriptyline suddenly, talk to your child's doctor first. The doctor may want to slowly decrease the dose of amitriptyline before stopping it to prevent withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, headache and tiredness. </li> <li>Keep your appointments with the doctor to have your child checked regularly. </li></ul><h2>What other information should you know about amitriptyline?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough amitriptyline to last through weekends, holidays and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills.</li><li>Keep amitriptyline tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmlodipineAAmlodipineAmlodipineEnglishPharmacyNAChestCardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-15T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh64.00000000000007.00000000000000649.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amlodipine. This information sheet explains what amlodipine does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amlodipine (say: am-LOE-di-peen). This information sheet explains what amlodipine does and how to give it to your child. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child amlodipine?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child this medicine:</p> <ul><li>Give this medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems well. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving your child this medicine for any reason. Make sure you have enough to last through weekends, holidays or vacations. </li> <li>Give your child amlodipine at the same time each day. </li> <li>Have your child take this medicine with food or milk, if the medicine causes an upset stomach. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of amlodipine?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of the medicine:</p> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose, and give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of amlodipine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some side effects while they take amlodipine. Usually your child will not need to see a doctor about them. </p> <p>These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to amlodipine. Check with your child's doctor if your child has any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>dizziness or light-headedness </li> <li>headache </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>upset stomach </li> <li>flushing of the face and a feeling of warmth </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>chest pain </li> <li>bleeding, tender, or swollen gums </li> <li>fainting or severe dizziness after a dose </li> <li>swollen ankles, feet, or lower legs </li> <li>any change in heartbeat, such as faster, slower, or uneven heartbeats </li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about amlodipine?</h2><ul><li>Your child may feel dizzy or light-headed when they start taking amlodipine. If your child feels dizzy, they should sit or lie down until they feel better</li><li>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicine, even medicine you can buy without a doctor's order (prescription). Some cold or allergy medicines may increase your child's blood pressure</li><li>Keep your appointments with the doctor to have your child's blood pressure checked</li><li>Make sure your child brushes and flosses their teeth daily to help prevent gum problems. You should also massage your child's gums regularly. Tell your child's dentist that your child is taking amlodipine. Your child should see the dentist regularly<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmoxicillinAAmoxicillinAmoxicillinEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh56.00000000000008.00000000000000943.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amoxicillin. This information sheet explains what amoxicillin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amoxicillin (say: a-moks-i-SIL-in). This information sheet explains what amoxicillin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving amoxicillin to your child:</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has an allergy to amoxicillin, penicillin antibiotics, or to other antibiotics </p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>kidney disease</li> <li>stomach or intestinal disease, especially <a href="/Article?contentid=924&language=English">colitis</a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=785&language=English">asthma</a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=938&language=English">phenylketonuria</a> (PKU) some chewable tablets may contain phenylalanine </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child amoxicillin?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child amoxicillin:</p> <ul><li>Give your child amoxicillin for as long as your doctor or<a href="/Article?contentid=1169&language=English"> pharmacist</a> tells you, even if your child seems better. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving amoxicillin for any reason. </li> <li>Give your child amoxicillin at the same times every day, exactly as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you. Pick a time that is easy for you so that you do not miss any doses. </li> <li>Your child may take amoxicillin orally with or without food. Give it with food if it upsets your child's stomach.</li> <li>If your child is taking chewable tablets, your child should chew the tablets well and thoroughly before swallowing. You can also crush the tablets and you can mix the contents with food or milk if preferred. </li> <li>If your child is taking liquid amoxicillin, shake the bottle well before giving your child each dose. Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of amoxicillin?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does amoxicillin take to work?</h2> <p>Your child may begin to feel better a few days after starting amoxicillin.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of amoxicillin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amoxicillin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>watery bowel movements (<a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>) </li> <li>stomach cramps or bloating (fullness) </li> <li>upset stomach or throwing up (vomiting)</li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>no improvement in condition or if you believe your child's condition is worse </li> <li>mild skin rash </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>severe skin rash, or<a href="/Article?contentid=789&language=English"> hives</a> (raised, red itchy areas on the skin) </li> <li>trouble breathing, wheezing or shortness of breath </li> <li>swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>a new <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> or a fever that does not get better </li> <li>severe stomach pain </li> <li>severe watery diarrhea, which may have blood or red streaks </li> <li>severe <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using amoxicillin?</h2> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p> <p>Birth control pills may not work properly while taking amoxicillin, and for 7 days after the course of antibiotics is finished. If your child takes birth control pills, please tell her doctor or pharmacist. </p> <p>If your child is diabetic, amoxicillin may cause false test results with some urine glucose (sugar) tests. Check with your child's pharmacist about what other glucose tests can be used. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about amoxicillin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or to the pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough amoxicillin to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills.</li><li>Keep amoxicillin capsules and chewable tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do not store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Keep amoxicillin liquid in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Amoxicillin and clavulanateAAmoxicillin and clavulanateAmoxicillin and clavulanateEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-01-25T05:00:00ZJanice Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, RPh, ACPR;Daniel Roth, MD PhD;Deena Savlov, MD, FRCPC49.000000000000010.00000000000001105.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amoxicillin + clavulanate. This information sheet explains what amoxicillin + clavulanate does, how to take it and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amoxicillin + clavulanate (say: a-moks-I-SIL-in and klav-yoo-LAN-ate). This information sheet explains what amoxicillin + clavulanate does, how to take it and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving amoxicillin + clavulanate to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child’s doctor if your child has:</p> <ul> <li>an allergy to amoxicillin, <a href="/Article?contentid=212&language=English">penicillin</a> or any other antibiotics </li> <li>an allergy to clavulanate </li> <li>an allergy to any other ingredient in the formulation</li> </ul> <h3>Talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. This medicine may not be right for your child if they have:</h3> <ul> <li>liver or kidney disease </li> <li>phenylketonuria (PKU) - the liquid form contains aspartame, which should be used with caution </li> <li>mononucleosis (“mono”) </li> </ul><h2>How should you give your child amoxicillin + clavulanate?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child amoxicillin + clavulanate:</p> <ul> <li>Give your child amoxicillin + clavulanate for as long as your child’s pharmacist or doctor tells you to, even if your child feels better. Tell your child’s doctor before you stop giving your child amoxicillin + clavulanate for any reason.</li> <li>Give your child amoxicillin + clavulanate at the same times each day, as instructed by your child’s doctor or pharmacist. Pick times that are easy to remember so that your child does not miss any doses. </li> <li>Your child may take amoxicillin + clavulanate with or without food. It is better to give your child amoxicillin + clavulanate at the same time as a meal if it upsets your child’s stomach.</li> </ul> <p>If your child is taking the liquid form of amoxicillin + clavulanate, shake the bottle well before each dose. Measure the dose with the syringe or medicine cup provided by your pharmacist.</p><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of amoxicillin + clavulanate?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of the medicine:</p> <ul> <li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose, and give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only one dose at a time. Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose.</li> </ul><h2>How long does amoxicillin + clavulanate take to work?</h2> <p>The medication will begin to work immediately.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of amoxicillin + clavulanate?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amoxicillin + clavulanate. These side effects are generally mild and may go away with time. Check with your child's doctor if the side effects are severe, do not go away or they bother your child:</p> <ul> <li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea)</li> <li>stomach cramps or bloating (fullness) </li> <li>upset stomach or throwing up (vomiting) </li> </ul> <p>Call your child’s doctor during office hours if your child has any of the following side effects:</p> <li>no improvement in condition or if you believe your child’s condition is worse</li> <li>mild skin rash, including diaper rash. </li> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of the following side effects:</h3> <ul> <li>severe skin rash, such as hives (raised, red itchy areas on the skin) or if large areas of skin are red, swollen, blistering or peeling</li> <li>trouble breathing, wheezing or shortness of breath</li> <li>swelling of face, lips, tongue or throat </li> <li>signs of liver problems like dark urine, light colored stools, yellow skin or eyes, severe stomach pain, unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>a new fever or a fever that does not get better </li> <li>severe watery diarrhea, which may have blood or red streaks </li> <li>severe vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>redness or white patches in the mouth or throat. </li> </ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using amoxicillin + clavulanate?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken during the same period when your child is taking the course of amoxicillin + clavulanate. Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products) during this period. </p> <p>Birth control pills may not work properly while taking amoxicillin + clavulanate, and for seven days after the course of amoxicillin + clavulanate is finished. If your child takes birth control pills, please tell her doctor or pharmacist before your child starts the course of amoxicillin + clavulanate.</p> <p>If your child has diabetes, amoxicillin may cause false test results with some urine glucose (sugar) tests. Check with your child’s pharmacist about what other glucose tests can be used.</p><h2>What other important information should I know about amoxicillin + clavulanate?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or to the pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child</li><li>Amoxicillin + clavulanate tablets should be stored at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do not store it in the bathroom or kitchen</li><li>Keep amoxicillin + clavulanate liquid in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines</li><li>Keep all medicines out of your child's sight and reach and locked up in a safe place. Keep the medicine in its original child-proof container or vial<br></li></ul><h2>References</h2> <ul> <li>Lexi-comp Online [Internet]. Amoxicillin and Clavulanate: Pediatric & Neonatal Lexi-Drugs, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc. [updated 2016 February 10; cited 2016 March 9]. Available from http://online.lexi.com/</li> <li>Canadian Pharmacists Association [Internet]. Clavulin Monograph. eCPS. [updated 2014 March 14; cited 2016 March 9]. Available from http://www.etherapeutics.ca/</li> <li>Lexi-comp Online [Internet]. Amoxicillin: AHFS Essentials (Adult and Pediatric), Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc. [updated 2016 February 10; cited 2016 March 9]. Available from: http://online.lexi.com/</li> </ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Amphotericin BAAmphotericin BAmphotericin BEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-05-27T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh53.00000000000009.00000000000000513.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amphotericin B. This information sheet explains what amphotericin does, how it is given, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amphotericin B (say: am-foe-TER-i-sin). This information sheet explains what amphotericin does, how it is given, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving amphotericin B to your child</h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has:</p><ul><li>an allergy to amphotericin B. </li></ul><p>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p><ul><li>kidney disease. </li><li>low blood potassium levels. </li><li>a history of infusion reactions with amphotericin B (fever, chills, nausea, flushing). </li></ul><h2>How is amphotericin B given?</h2><p>Amphotericin B is a liquid which is injected or given as a shot into a vein (IV).</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of amphotericin B?</h2><p>If your child has any of these side effects during the infusion, tell the nurse or doctor immediately:</p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a>, chills </li><li>Sweating </li><li>Difficult or rapid breathing </li><li>Fast, slow, or uneven heart beat </li><li>Fainting </li><li>Blurred vision </li></ul><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amphotericin B. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">Headache</a> </li><li>Loss of appetite </li><li>Upset stomach, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> </li><li>Watery bowel movements (<a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>) </li><li>Dizziness or feeling light-headed </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using amphotericin B?</h2><p>Your doctor will check your child's blood on a regular basis. This is to check for changes in kidney function as well as to monitor the amount of potassium and <a href="/Article?contentid=179&language=English">magnesium</a> in the blood. </p><p>Please tell your doctor immediately if your child is unable to pass urine, or if the urine has changed colour (dark urine, or pink-red urine). </p><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about amphotericin B?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Your child may be given other medicines before their amphotericin B dose in order to prevent chills and fever</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AmsacrineAAmsacrineAmsacrineEnglishPharmacyNANALymphatic systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh62.00000000000008.000000000000001164.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called amsacrine. This information sheet explains what amsacrine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called amsacrine (say: AM-sah-kreen). This information sheet explains what amsacrine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving amsacrine to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to amsacrine or any other drug, food, preservatives, or colouring agents. </p> <p>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medication if your child has: </p> <ul><li>low blood counts. </li> <li>heart rhythm problems. </li> <li>infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, <a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=English">chickenpox</a>). </li> <li>kidney or liver problems. </li></ul><h2>How will your child get amsacrine?</h2> <p>Amsacrine is an orange-red liquid given as an injection (needle) into your child's vein. This is done in the hospital clinic or on the nursing unit. </p> <p>If amsacrine leaks out of the vein through which it is being given, it may cause severe damage and scarring. This may happen while your child is getting amsacrine or afterwards. Tell the doctor or nurse right away if you or your child notice redness, pain, or swelling at the place of injection. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of amsacrine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take amsacrine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>nausea (upset stomach) or <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li> <li>sores in mouth or on lips </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> (loose, watery stools) </li> <li>hair loss </li> <li>burning, numbness, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings </li> <li>orange-coloured urine (common for a few days after amsacrine) </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a> </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>yellow eyes or skin </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>, chills, cough, sore throat </li> <li>easy bruising or bleeding </li> <li>vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds </li> <li>black tarry stools </li> <li>blood in the urine </li> <li>painful or difficult urination </li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>fast or irregular or uneven heartbeat </li> <li>dizziness, feeling faint or lightheadedness </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>pain or swelling around the rectum </li> <li>tightness of the throat, trouble breathing, itchiness, or redness during the time the drug is being given into the vein </li> <li>symptoms of an allergic reaction: rash, hives, shortness of breath, chest tightness, or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat </li> <li>symptoms of low potassium levels: muscle pain or weakness, muscle cramps </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using amsacrine?</h2> <p>Your child may lose their hair. It will grow back once your child is no longer receiving amsacrine. Its colour and texture may change. Use a gentle shampoo and a soft brush. </p> <p>Amsacrine may cause changes in heart rhythm in some people. Your child's heart may be monitored while they are getting amsacrine.</p> <p>Amsacrine can lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the flu. </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You/your child shouldn't touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing yours/their hands first. </li> <li>Your child's nurse will review with you what to do in case of fever. </li></ul> <p>Amsacrine can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, fingernail scissors, or toenail clippers. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking amsacrine. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. </p> <p>Amsacrine may cause sores in the mouth. Rinse your child's mouth with a mouthwash made from baking soda to help keep it clean. Your nurse or pharmacist can review this with you. Avoid store bought mouthwash as it may sting and cause dry mouth. </p> <p>There is a chance that amsacrine may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. <br>If your child is sexually active it is best that they use some kind of birth control while receiving amsacrine. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>After receiving amsacrine, your child may not be able to have children or have more difficulty having children. Your child's doctor will discuss this in more detail with you/your child. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). The medicines listed below may interact with the amsacrine as well, but this list is not complete.</p> <ul><li>Acetylsalicyclic acid (Aspirin)</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">Ibuprofen</a> (Advil)</li> <li>Blood thinners</li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about amsacrine?</h2><ul><li>Your child will receive medicine to prevent upset stomach and throwing up caused by amsacrine</li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on to show the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Antithymocyte Globulin (ATG)AAntithymocyte Globulin (ATG)Antithymocyte Globulin (ATG)EnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh52.00000000000009.000000000000001341.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called antithymocyte globulin. This information sheet explains what antithymocyte globulin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called antithymocyte globulin (say: an-tee-THY-moe-site GLOB-yoo-lin). This information sheet explains what antithymocyte globulin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving antithymocyte globulin to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has:</p> <ul><li>received either form of ATG (horse or rabbit) in the past. </li> <li>an allergy to ATG. </li> <li>an allergy to rabbit proteins. </li> <li>an allergy to other horse globulin preparations. </li> <li>any other allergies. </li></ul> <p>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p> <ul><li>a current infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, <a href="/Article?contentid=760&language=English">chickenpox</a>). </li> <li>persistent, low white blood cell count (leukopenia). </li> <li>persistent, low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia). </li></ul><h2>How will antithymocyte globulin be given to your child?</h2> <p>ATG is a liquid given by needle into your child's vein (intravenously or IV) or through a central venous line. It is given very slowly over a period of hours. Your child will get this medicine in the hospital clinic or on a nursing unit. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of antithymocyte globulin?</h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they receive antithymocyte globulin. Some side effects are more likely to occur while the drug is being given. These side effects are called infusion reactions. Common infusion reactions with ATG include: </p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> </li><li>chills </li><li>shaking (also called rigors) </li><li>rash </li></ul><p>Because these reactions are common during ATG, your child will probably be given medicine before getting antithymocyte globulin. <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">Acetaminophen</a> (Tylenol), diphenhydramine (Benadryl), and <a href="/article?contentid=221&language=English">corticosteroids</a> (for example, hydrocortisone) may be used while in hospital to try to prevent or ease some of these side effects. </p><p>If these side effects occur at home, call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency.</p><p>Once your child is out of the hospital, check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p><ul><li>abdominal pain </li><li>nausea or upset stomach </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> (loose, watery stools) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=29&language=English">headache</a> </li></ul><p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p><ul><li>weakness, loss of strength </li><li>muscle and joint pain </li><li>white patches in the mouth </li> </ul><h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3><ul><li>fever or chills </li><li>cough or hoarseness </li><li>lower back or side pain </li><li>painful or difficult urination </li><li>nervousness or confusion </li><li>irregular heartbeat or fast heartbeat </li><li>numbness or tingling in hands, feet, or lips </li><li>shortness of breath or difficulty breathing </li><li>weakness or heaviness of legs </li><li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li><li>black, tarry stools </li><li>blood in urine or stools </li><li>pinpoint red spots on skin </li><li>severe skin rash, itching </li><li>fainting </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using antithymocyte globulin?</h2> <p>The use of ATG combined with other drugs which suppress the immune system may increase the risk of getting severe infections. Your child may be given some antibiotics to lower the risk of getting infections. Other things that you and your child can do to help prevent infections include: </p> <ul><li>avoiding people with infections, such as a cold or the <a href="/Article?contentid=763&language=English">flu</a> </li> <li>avoiding places that are very crowded with large groups of people </li> <li>frequent hand washing to prevent the spread of germs that cause infections </li> <li>you/your child shouldn t touch their eyes or inside of their nose without washing your/your child's hands first </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated with ATG. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccine. </p> <p>ATG can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, scissors, or clippers to cut their nails or hair. </li> <li>Your child should be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Your child should not receive a permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is receiving ATG. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your child's doctor, nurse, or dentist can tell you about other ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li></ul> <p>Your child may still have side effects 1 or 2 weeks after they have finished getting antithymocyte globulin. Call your child's doctor or nurse right away if your child has any of the following signs: </p> <ul><li>fever </li> <li>tiredness </li> <li>sore joints or muscles </li> <li>rash </li> <li>throwing up </li> <li>swollen glands </li> <li>changes in vision </li></ul> <p>The use of ATG with other immunosuppresants may increase the risk of getting certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma. Check with your doctor right away if any of the following signs occur even after ATG treatment has stopped: </p> <ul><li>yellow eyes or skin </li> <li>black tarry stools </li> <li>blood in urine or stools </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li> <li>swelling in the neck, armpit, or groin, or unexplained swelling in an arm or leg </li> <li>fever and chills </li> <li>unexplained weight loss </li> <li>night sweats </li> <li>lack of energy </li></ul> <p>There is a chance that ATG may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active it is recommended that she use some kind of birth control while receiving ATG. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about antithymocyte globulin?</h2><ul> <li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines</li></ul> <br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AprepitantAAprepitantAprepitant EnglishPharmacyNAStomachStomachDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2016-12-05T05:00:00ZPriya Patel, BScPhm, PharmD, RPh;L. Lee Dupuis, PhD, ACPR, FCSHP, RPh;Paul Nathan, MSc, MD;Avram Denburg, MSc, MD, FRCPC60.00000000000008.00000000000000751.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called aprepitant. This information sheet explains what aprepitant does, how to take it and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called aprepitant (say: ap-RE-pi-tant). This information sheet explains what aprepitant does, how to take it and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving aprepitant to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child is allergic to aprepitant or any ingredient in the formulation.</p><h2>How should you give your child aprepitant?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child aprepitant:</p> <ul> <li>Give your child aprepitant by mouth as the capsule or the liquid. Give the first dose of aprepitant about an hour before your child receives the first dose of chemotherapy.</li> <li>Give aprepitant by mouth exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you.</li> <li>Aprepitant can be given with or without food.</li> <li>Measure the dose of aprepitant oral liquid with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you.</li> </ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of aprepitant?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of the medicine:</p> <ul> <li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and give your child the next dose at the regular time.</li> <li>Give your child only one dose at a time. However, if your child vomits (throws up) less than 30 minutes after you gave a dose, give your child another dose. Check to make sure that you have enough aprepitant on hand to give your child the aprepitant doses planned for the next two days. You may need to contact your doctor or pharmacist to get more.</li> </ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of aprepitant?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take aprepitant. Check with your child's doctor if these side effects do not go away or they bother your child:</p> <ul> <li>Hiccups</li> <li>Feeling tired or weak</li> <li>Diarrhea (loose stools)</li> <li>Stomach pain</li> <li>Loss of appetite </li> <li>Dizziness</li> <li>Headache </li> </ul> <h3>The following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects:</h3> <ul> <li>Swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat </li> <li>Wheezing, trouble breathing or shortness of breath </li> <li>Severe skin rash or hives (red raised spots on the skin) </li> <li>Signs of infection like fever, chills, sore throat, more phlegm (thick saliva, mucous, sputum) than usual or change in colour of phlegm, pain when urinating (peeing) or a wound that will not heal.</li> </ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using aprepitant?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with aprepitant or in some cases the dose of the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, non-prescription or herbal) including dexamethasone or warfarin.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about aprepitant?</h2><ul><li>Let your child’s doctor, nurse or pharmacist know if your child vomits (throws up) and retches (dry heaves) more than twice on a day that your child received chemotherapy.</li><li>Keep all medicines out of your child’s sight and reach.</li><li>Keep aprepitant capsules at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do not store it in the bathroom.</li><li>Keep aprepitant liquid in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines. </li><li>Pregnancy should be avoided while taking this medication. </li></ul><br><h2>​​References</h2> <ul> <li>Lexicomp Online , Pediatric & Neonatal Lexi-Drugs , Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 11, 2016.</li> <li>Emend (aprepitant) [prescribing information]. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck & Co; December 2015.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AsparaginaseAAsparaginaseAsparaginaseEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh52.000000000000010.00000000000001002.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called asparaginase. This information sheet explains what asparaginase does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called asparaginase (say: a-SPARE-a-jin-ase). This information sheet explains what asparaginase does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving asparaginase to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has:</p> <ul><li>ever reacted badly to asparaginase or any other medication </li> <li>ever had problems with their pancreas, including a condition called pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) </li></ul> <p>Also, talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </p> <ul><li>an infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, chickenpox) </li> <li>problems with blood sugar or diabetes </li> <li>liver problems </li> <li>a history of bleeding or clotting problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child asparaginase?</h2><p>Asparaginase is a clear liquid. A nurse will give your child asparaginase by putting a needle into a muscle (intramuscular or IM injection) or a vein (intravenous or IV injection). Usually your child will get this medicine in the hospital clinic or on the nursing unit. </p><p>Your child will need to stay in the clinic for about two hours after an injection of asparaginase. This is so the medical team can watch your child for any signs of an allergic reaction. They will watch your child for hives (raised, red, itchy areas on the skin), a skin rash, a swollen or flushed (red) face or trouble breathing.<br></p><h2>What are the possible side effects of this asparaginase?<br></h2><p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take asparaginase. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p><ul><li>nausea (upset stomach) </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li><li>slight soreness at the site of injection </li><li>mild headache </li><li>loss of appetite </li></ul><p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if child has any of these side effects:</p><ul><li>unusual tiredness </li><li>yellow eyes or skin </li><li>joint pain, such as the toes, knuckles, knees </li><li>lower back or side pain </li><li>frequent urination </li><li>unusual thirst or extremely thirsty </li><li>hardness, redness or swelling at the site of injection </li></ul><p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </p><ul><li>trouble breathing or shortness of breath </li><li>puffy face </li><li>skin rash or itching </li><li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li><li>stomach pain with vomiting (throwing up) </li><li>fever or chills </li><li>cough or chest pain </li><li>severe headache </li><li>cannot move arm or leg </li><li>slurred speech or trouble speaking </li><li>confusion or change in personality </li><li>seizures </li><li>unusual drowsiness, clumsiness, or loss of coordination </li><li>sudden changes in eyesight </li><li>sore throat or hoarseness </li><li>swelling of the legs and feet </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using asparaginase?</h2> <p>Asparaginase can increase the risk of blood clots. Blood clots can cause symptoms of a stroke such as a sudden change in level of consciousness (alertness), confusion, difficulty speaking, and difficulty using parts of the body. If you notice any of these changes in your child, it is important to get emergency help. Sometimes these symptoms may occur days or weeks after a dose of asparaginase. </p> <p>If your child has diabetes, they may have trouble controlling the sugar in the blood while getting asparaginase. The doctor may need to check your child's blood sugar more often. </p> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. </p> <p>There is a chance that asparaginase may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active it is best that they use some kind of birth control while receiving asparaginase. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>Tell your doctor or dentist that your child is getting asparaginase before your child has any surgery, including dental surgery, or an emergency treatment. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about asparaginase?</h2><ul><li>Stomach upset (nausea) and throwing up are not common with asparaginase</li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on to show the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Atropine for droolingAAtropine for droolingAtropine for droolingEnglishPharmacyNAMouthNervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-12-21T05:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPhBradley Mitchelmore, BSc.(Pharm), ACPR64.00000000000008.00000000000000951.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>​Your child needs to take the medicine called atropine. This information sheet explains what atropine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when he or she takes this medicine.<br></p><p>​Your child needs to take the medicine called atropine. This information sheet explains what atropine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when he or she takes this medicine.</p><h2>Before giving atropine to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has:</p> <ul><li>A history of allergic reaction to atropine or other anticholinergics (<a href="/Article?contentid=148&language=English">glycopyrrolate</a>, scopolamine, hyoscine, belladonna, and other medicines used to treat bowel spasms and urine incontinence)</li> <li>Narrow-angle glaucoma</li> <li>Blockage in the intestines</li> <li>Myasthenia gravis</li> <li>Ulcerative colitis</li></ul> <p>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Your child may be more sensitive to the side effects of this medicine if your child has:</p> <ul><li>Severe liver or kidney disease</li> <li>Heart rhythm abnormalities (heart block, fast or irregular heart rate)</li> <li>Heart failure</li> <li>High blood pressure </li> <li>Narrowing of the lower part of the stomach (pyloric stenosis)</li> <li>Heartburn</li> <li>High thyroid hormone</li> <li>Urinary retention</li> <li>Constipation</li> <li>Nerve damage that affects your child's ability to control temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and bowel and bladder emptying</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child atropine?</h2> <ul><li>Wipe away any excess saliva or secretions</li> <li>Give this medicine by placing the prescribed number of drops under the tongue</li> <li>Take steps to avoid giving too large of a dose:</li></ul> <p></p> <ol><ol><li>Turn the bottle upside down.</li> <li>Squeeze the bottle lightly and allow the drop to fall under the tongue. Do not give more than one drop with each squeeze of the bottle.</li> <li>Repeat for the prescribed number of drops.</li></ol></ol> <ul><li>Do not give this drug by any other method than by placing the drops under the tongue. The medicine will not work as well if they are swallowed. Your child may also experience more side effects if the drops are swallowed.</li> <li>Avoid contact between the bottle and surfaces of the mouth.</li> <li>If 2 drops are prescribed, attempt to deliver one on each side of the tongue as this may result in better drooling management.</li></ul><h2>How long does atropine take to work?</h2><p>Atropine will start to reduce the amount of saliva within 5 to 30 minutes, and the effect will last approximately 4 to 6 hours.<br></p><h2>What are the possible side effects of atropine?</h2> <p>Even though atropine is meant to act locally within the mouth, side effects throughout the body can still occur. Side effects to atropine occur more frequently with higher doses. Children may be more sensitive to high doses of this medicine.</p> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take atropine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child:</p> <ul><li>Facial flushing</li> <li>Excessive dry mouth/mucous membranes or skin</li> <li>Blurred vision </li> <li>Eyes are sensitive to light</li> <li>Drowsiness</li> <li>Upset stomach</li> <li>Difficulty urinating</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=6&language=English">Constipation</a></li></ul> <p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>Rash</li> <li>Fast and/or irregular heart rate</li> <li>Severe abdominal pain</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li> <li>Confusion</li> <li>Excitement, irritability, behaviour changes</li> <li>Hallucinations</li> <li>Difficulty breathing</li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using atropine?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with atropine or in some cases the dose of atropine or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medicines (prescription, over the counter or herbal) including: </p> <ul><li>Antidepressants, antipsychotics, or medicines used to treat anxiety.</li> <li>Antihistamines (diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine, hydroxyzine)</li> <li>Muscle relaxants</li> <li>Antinauseants (prochlorperazine, dimenhydrinate)</li> <li>Drugs used to treat urinary incontinence (<a href="/Article?contentid=207&language=English">oxybutynin</a>, tolteridine, and others)</li> <li>Diphenoxylate atropine (Lomotil?)</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=162&language=English">Ipratropium</a> (Atrovent?)</li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about atropine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medicines your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child</li><li>Keep atropine at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Keep tightly closed. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
AzathioprineAAzathioprineAzathioprineEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh58.00000000000008.000000000000001244.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called azathioprine. This information sheet explains what azathioprine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called azathioprine (say: ay-za-THYE-oh-preen). This information sheet explains what azathioprine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving azathioprine to your child?</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child is allergic to azathioprine, other medicines, preservatives, dyes, or food.</p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>Kidney or liver disease. </li> <li>An infection (as azathioprine may decrease your child's ability to fight infection) </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child azathioprine?</h2> <ul><li>Exactly as your doctor or your pharmacist tells you to, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you change the dose or stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your child may become ill if they stop taking this medicine suddenly. </li> <li>At the same time every day. Pick a time that is easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>With or without food, however if the medicine upsets your child's stomach give after a meal. </li> <li>If your child is taking the liquid form, shake the bottle well. Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li> <li>If your child throws up (vomits) shortly after taking the medicine, check with your nurse or doctor about whether to give another dose. </li></ul> <p>Azathioprine lowers your child's immune response, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the flu. </li> <li>Your child's nurse will review with you what to do in case of <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a>. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of azathioprine?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does azathioprine take to work?</h2> <p>Azathioprine may take up to several months to have its full effect in some conditions.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of azathioprine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take azathioprine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>Loss of appetite</li> <li>Upset stomach, throwing up </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the nearest Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>If your child shows signs of a life-threatening reaction including: wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin colour; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat. </li> <li>If your child shows any signs or symptoms of infection. These include a fever of 38°C or higher, chills, severe sore throat, ear or sinus pain, cough, increased mucus or change in color, painful urination, mouth sores or a wound that will not heal. </li> <li>Severe dizziness or fainting. </li> <li>Severe belly pain. </li> <li>Severe nausea or <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a>. </li> <li>Unusual bruising or bleeding. </li> <li>Dark urine or yellow skin or eyes. </li></ul> <p>Long-term use of azathioprine may very rarely increase the risk of certain types of cancer, including skin cancer and lymphoma. Limit sun exposure and use sunscreen to reduce the risk of skin cancer. Signs and symptoms of lymphoma to look out for include a painless swelling in one or more of the <a href="/Article?contentid=777&language=English">lymph nodes </a>of the neck, collarbone region, armpits, or groin. </p><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using azathioprine?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with azathioprine or in some cases the dose of azathioprine or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter or herbal) including: </p> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=67&language=English">Allopurinol</a> </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=112&language=English">Co-trimoxazole</a> (Septra?) or <a href="/Article?contentid=257&language=English">trimethoprim</a> </li> <li>Aspirin containing products </li> <li><a href="/article?contentid=1069&language=English">Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)</a> (e.g. <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a>) </li> <li>Blood thinners (<a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=108&language=English">clopidogrel</a>) </li> <li>Garlic, ginseng, ginkgo, or vitamin E </li></ul> <p>Be careful about vaccinations while your child is receiving this medicine. While your child is being treated with azathioprine, and for several weeks/months after you stop treatment with it, it is important to see your child's doctor about any immunizations (vaccinations) they may need. Do not get any immunizations without your doctor's approval. Some vaccinations must not be given while your child is taking azathioprine. In addition, other people living in the same house should not take oral polio vaccine since there is a chance they could pass the polio virus on to your child. </p> <p>There is a chance that azathioprine may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving azathioprine. Tell your doctor right away if you think your child may be pregnant. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about azathioprine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough azathioprine to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills.</li><li>If your child needs azathioprine liquid, it must be made by a pharmacy. Check if your pharmacy is able to make azathioprine liquid and ensure that you give them plenty of notice as it may take several days.</li><li>Keep azathioprine at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Baclofen (Intrathecal)BBaclofen (Intrathecal)Baclofen (Intrathecal)EnglishPharmacyNANAMuscular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-03-11T05:00:00Z58.00000000000008.000000000000001008.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called baclofen. This information sheet explains what baclofen does, how it is given, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called baclofen (say: BAK-loe-fen). This information sheet explains what baclofen does, how it is given, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving baclofen to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has an allergy to baclofen.</p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>diabetes (increased blood sugar) </li> <li>epilepsy (seizures) </li> <li>kidney disease </li> <li>mental or emotional problems </li> <li>stroke or other brain disease </li> <li>communication difficulties </li> <li>spinal cord injuries </li> <li>history of withdrawal symptoms to baclofen </li></ul><h2>How is baclofen given to my child?</h2> <ul><li>Baclofen intrathecal is given as an injection (needle) into the spinal fluid around your child's spinal cord by a nurse or a doctor. It is given as a single injection or by using a catheter and a pump. </li> <li>A special pump may be implanted under your child's skin. This allows the medication to flow continuously into your child's body. </li> <li>It may take several days to find the best dose of baclofen for your child. Once the best dose is found, your doctor will check how your child is doing at regular visits. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. It is important that you do not stop the medication suddenly. </li> <li><strong>Make sure that you do not miss appointments to refill the pump. If the pump is not refilled on time, your child could have serious withdrawal symptoms.</strong> </li></ul><h2>How long does baclofen take to work?</h2> <p>Your child may start feeling the effects of the baclofen a few days after starting the medicine. Tell your child's doctor if baclofen is not helping your child. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of baclofen?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take baclofen. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>constipation </li> <li>nausea or vomiting </li> <li>problems urinating </li> <li>dizziness </li> <li>headache </li> <li>numbness or tingling in hands or feet </li> <li>dry mouth </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>convulsions (seizures) </li> <li>bloody or dark urine </li> <li>chest pain or uneven heart beat </li> <li>ringing or buzzing in the ears </li> <li>blurred vision </li> <li>rash </li> <li>extreme weakness </li> <li>hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) </li> <li>shortness of breath or trouble breathing </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using baclofen?</h2> <h3>DO NOT STOP BACLOFEN INTRATHECAL SUDDENLY. DO NOT MISS APPOINTMENTS TO REFILL THE PUMP.</h3> <p>Stopping this medicine suddenly can cause serious medical problems. Signs that your child's pump may not be functioning properly or that the pump does not have enough baclofen include: </p> <ul><li>an increase or return in spasticity </li> <li>muscles becoming rigid </li> <li>itching </li> <li>low blood pressure </li> <li>light-headedness </li> <li>tingling sensation </li> <li>high fever </li> <li>change in level of consciousness or mental status, such as confusion, drowsiness, or disorientation </li></ul> <p>If muscle spasticity is not improving or if your child starts having spasms again, contact your doctor immediately.</p> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with baclofen intrathecal or in some cases the dose of baclofen or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products), including: </p> <ul><li>antihistamines or medicine for hay fever and allergies </li> <li>sedatives or sleeping medicines </li> <li>prescription pain medicine or narcotics </li> <li>medications for seizures </li> <li>other muscle relaxants </li></ul> <p>Intrathecal baclofen may cause dry mouth. Brush your child's teeth regularly and rinse your child's mouth with a mouthwash made from baking soda to help keep it clean. Your nurse or pharmacist can review this with you. Avoid store-bought mouthwash as it may sting and cause dry mouth. If dry mouth continues for more than 2 weeks, speak with your doctor or dentist. </p> <p>Baclofen may make your child dizzy, drowsy, and less alert than normal. Watch carefully when your child is doing something that they need to be alert for. Your child's teacher should also know that your child is taking medication with these effects. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about baclofen?</h2><ul><li> Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child</li><li>Make sure you always have enough baclofen to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Baclofen (Oral)BBaclofen (Oral)Baclofen (Oral)EnglishPharmacyNANAMuscular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-02-24T05:00:00Z63.00000000000008.000000000000001007.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called baclofen. This information sheet explains what baclofen does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called baclofen (say: BAK-loe-fen). This information sheet explains what baclofen does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving baclofen to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has an allergy to baclofen.</p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>diabetes (increased blood sugar) </li> <li>epilepsy (seizures) </li> <li>kidney disease </li> <li>mental or emotional problems </li> <li>stroke or other brain disease </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child baclofen?</h2> <ul><li>Give your child baclofen exactly as your doctor or your pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. </li> <li>Give your child baclofen at the same times every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Have your child take baclofen with food or milk. </li> <li>If your child is taking liquid baclofen, shake the bottle well before you give your child the medicine. Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li> <li>If your child is taking part of a baclofen tablet, a tablet splitter will help. You can buy a tablet splitter at your pharmacy. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of baclofen?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does baclofen take to work?</h2> <p>Your child may start feeling the effects of the baclofen 1 to 2 weeks after starting the medicine. Tell your child's doctor if baclofen is not helping your child. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of baclofen?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take baclofen. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>confusion </li> <li>dizziness or lightheadedness </li> <li>drowsiness </li> <li>nausea </li> <li>stomach upset </li> <li>unusual weakness, especially in the muscles </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>convulsions (seizures) </li> <li>bloody or dark urine </li> <li>chest pain or uneven heartbeat </li> <li>ringing or buzzing in the ears </li> <li>blurred vision </li> <li>rash </li> <li>extreme weakness </li> <li>hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) </li> <li>shortness of breath or trouble breathing </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using baclofen?</h2> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p> <p>In addition to taking baclofen, keep doing the things your child's doctor recommends to help tight muscles, like stretching exercises. </p> <p>Baclofen may make your child dizzy, drowsy, and less alert than normal. Watch carefully when your child is doing something that they need to be alert for, such as climbing stairs. Your child's teacher should also know that your child is taking medication with these effects. </p> <p>If your child is diabetic, baclofen may increase the blood sugar levels. Talk with your doctor if you notice any changes in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests. </p> <p>Do not suddenly stop giving your child this medicine. Unwanted effects may occur if the medicine is stopped suddenly. Check with your doctor for the best way to slowly stop taking baclofen. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about baclofen?</h2> <ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child</li><li>Baclofen liquid must be made by a pharmacy. Make sure your pharmacy is able to make baclofen liquid for your child</li><li>Make sure you always have enough baclofen to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills</li><li>Keep baclofen tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store tablets in the bathroom or kitchen</li><li>Keep baclofen liquid in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines</li></ul> <br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Baking soda mouthwashBBaking soda mouthwashBaking Soda MouthwashEnglishPharmacyNAMouthNADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh68.00000000000007.00000000000000859.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called baking soda mouthwash. This information sheet explains what baking soda mouthwash does, how to make it, and how to give it.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called baking soda mouthwash. This information sheet explains what baking soda mouthwash does, how to make it, and how to give it. </p><h2>How to make your own mouthwash:</h2> <p>To make your own mouthwash, you will need a box of baking soda, a measuring cup, measuring spoons, a clean bottle with a lid, and tap water. </p> <p>Follow these 5 steps to make your own mouthwash:</p> <ol><li>Fill a measuring cup with 1 cup (250 mL) of water from the tap.</li> <li>Measure 1/4 teaspoon (1 mL) of baking soda with a measuring spoon.</li> <li>Put the baking soda you just measured into the cup of water from the tap.</li> <li>Stir the baking soda in the water until the baking soda dissolves.</li> <li>Pour the mouthwash from the measuring cup into the bottle and close the lid.</li></ol> <p>Your mouthwash is now ready to use. This mouthwash can be used for 24 hours. After 24 hours, throw away any unused portion and make a fresh batch. </p><h2>How should you give your child baking soda mouthwash?</h2> <ul><li>Ask your child to swish the baking soda mouthwash around in the mouth for 30 to 60 seconds and then it spit out </li> <li>Then rinse the mouth with plain water </li> <li>Baking soda mouthwash SHOULD NOT be swallowed. The mouthwash is not harmful if small amounts are accidentally swallowed. </li> <li>Your child should use the baking soda mouthwash several times a day as needed, usually after meals and at bedtime. </li></ul> <p>If your child is not old enough to swish and spit the baking soda mouthwash, you may clean your child's teeth and gums with a soft toothbrush dipped in the mouthwash. If your child has mouth sores, you may wish to use a Toothette? instead of a toothbrush to clean your child's mouth. </p> <p>Ask your child to rinse the mouth well with the baking soda mouthwash after they have vomited or thrown up. Brushing the teeth without first neutralizing the stomach acids in the mouth may cause tooth enamel to break down. </p><h2>What measures should you take when your child is using baking soda mouthwash?</h2> <p>If your child has mouth sores, your child should avoid foods that irritate the mouth. Foods to avoid are:</p> <ul><li>citrus fruits and juices, such as orange juice, lemons, tomatoes </li> <li>spicy foods </li> <li>rough or crunchy foods, such as tortilla chips </li> <li>foods that are very hot in temperature </li></ul> <p>If your child has mouth sores, give them foods that are easy to chew and swallow. The following foods are examples:</p> <ul><li>milk shakes </li> <li>cooked cereals </li> <li>scrambled eggs </li> <li>soft and pureed fruits and vegetables, such as applesauce and mashed potatoes </li> <li>custards, puddings, and gelatins (Jell-O?) </li> <li>frozen yogurt, sherbet, or ice cream </li></ul> <p>Your child can also suck on ice chips or popsicles to help soothe the mouth sores.</p> <p>Straws may be used to drink liquids.</p> <p>If your child's mouth sores get worse, talk to your child's doctor or nurse about other remedies.</p> <p>For other ideas or concerns about your child's diet, ask to speak with a dietitian.</p> <p>Most mouthwashes sold in drug stores or grocery stores should not be used. They may have a high alcohol content and can dry or irritate the mouth and gums. Flavouring and colouring agents also may be irritating. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about baking soda mouthwash?</h2><ul><li>If your child is having mouth sores or pain that is affecting their eating, drinking, or talking, let your doctor or nurse know as soon as possible. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Keep the baking soda mouthwash at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Beclomethasone for inhalationBBeclomethasone for inhalationBeclomethasone for inhalationEnglishPharmacyNALungsRespiratory systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-03-04T05:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh1147.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called beclomethasone. This information sheet explains what beclomethasone does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called beclomethasone (say: be-kloe-METH-a-sone). This information sheet explains what beclomethasone does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. <br></p><h2>Before giving beclomethasone to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child is allergic to beclomethasone. Precautions may be needed with this medicine if your child has: </p> <ul><li>had any serious infections in the past, such as tuberculosis (TB)</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child beclomethasone?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child beclomethasone:</p> <ul><li>Give your child beclomethasone exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems better.</li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you change the dose or stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your child may become ill if they stop taking this medicine suddenly. </li> <li>Give your child beclomethasone at the same time every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses.</li> <li>Have your child breathe beclomethasone in through the mouth.</li> <li>If you are not sure how to give your child this medicine, ask the pharmacist or the nurse in the Asthma Clinic to show you.</li> <li>If your child uses a reliever medicine with beclomethasone, use the reliever medicine first. The reliever medicine opens the airways, which helps beclomethasone enter deeper into the lungs. </li> <li>Wait five minutes between giving beclomethasone and the reliever medicine. Waiting five minutes lets the airways open up enough so that beclomethasone is better absorbed. </li> <li>Have your child rinse their mouth with water after taking the beclomethasone to help reduce its side effects.</li> <li>If your child is too young to rinse their mouth out, give them water or juice to drink after every dose of beclomethasone.</li> <li>Your doctor or asthma nurse may give you a spacer device (commonly called an Aerochamber) to use with your child's inhaler. A spacer is a device designed to make the puffer easier to use by helping deliver more medicine directly into the lungs where it is needed. This makes the medicine more effective and reduces the side effects that may occur from inhaling the medicine into the mouth or throat. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of beclomethasone?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time.</li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose.</li></ul><h2>How long does beclomethasone take to work?</h2> <p>It may take four to six weeks after your child starts beclomethasone before you see their breathing getting better.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of beclomethasone?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take beclomethasone. Check with your child's doctor if they continue to have any of these side effects, especially if they do not go away or they bother them: </p> <ul><li>dry mouth or throat</li> <li>sore throat and cough</li> <li>hoarse voice</li> <li>headaches</li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if they have any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>white patches in the mouth; this can be a sign of a mouth infection</li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. </h3> <p>Call your child's doctor right away or take them to the nearest Emergency Department if they have any of these side effects, especially if they do not go away after using the reliever medicine: </p> <ul><li>wheezing</li> <li>chest tightness</li> <li>fever</li> <li>itching</li> <li>bad cough</li> <li>blue skin colour</li> <li>seizures (convulsions)</li> <li>rash or any other sign of an allergic reaction, such as swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat</li> <li>any other unusual behaviour</li></ul> <p>Any of these symptoms could be signs of a life-threatening reaction.</p><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using beclomethasone?</h2> <p>Beclomethasone does not stop an asthma attack after it has already started. Your child should use the reliever medicine.</p> <p>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so the doctor can check your child's reaction to beclomethasone. The doctor may need to change the dose so that your child is getting the right amount. </p> <p>These warning signs indicate that your child's asthma is getting worse and that they need to see their doctor:</p> <ul><li>Symptoms, such as coughing, attacks of wheezing, chest tightness, or severe breathlessness, become worse or more frequent.</li> <li>Relief lasts less than three hours after taking the reliever medicine.</li> <li>Your child wakes up at night with chest tightness, wheezing, or shortness of breath.</li> <li>Your child is missing school or other activities because of asthma.</li></ul> <p>Gargling and rinsing the mouth with water after each dose may help prevent hoarseness, throat irritation, and infection in the mouth. Your doctor may also want your child to use a spacer device to prevent these problems. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving them any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about beclomethasone?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough beclomethasone to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep beclomethasone at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not store near heat (stoves, hot water, radiator, etc.), as the inhaler (puffer) may explode if heated. Do not burn. Do not put holes in the metal part of the puffer. The contents are under pressure. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Belladonna and Opium SuppositoriesBBelladonna and Opium SuppositoriesBelladonna and Opium SuppositoriesEnglishPharmacyNANARenal system/Urinary systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA1996-10-27T04:00:00Z49.00000000000009.00000000000000534.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine that contains two medicines, belladonna and opium. This information sheet explains what belladonna and opium do, how to take it, and what side effects, or problems, your child may have when they take this medici</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine that contains 2 medicines, belladonna (say: bel-a-DON-a) and opium (say: OH-pee-um). This information sheet explains what belladonna and opium do, how to take the medicine, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should I give my child belladonna and opium?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child this medicine:</p> <ul><li>Give the medicine by rectum (into the bum). </li> <li>Give your child the medicine exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you to. Do not give extra medicine or give it more often than you are told. If you do not feel that it is working properly, talk to your doctor. </li></ul> <p>For instructions on how to give a suppository, please see "<a href="/Article?contentid=992&language=English">Suppository Instructions</a>." </p><h2>What should I do if my child misses a dose of belladonna and opium?</h2> <p>Usually this medication is taken only as needed, but if your child is taking this medicine at regular times:</p> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. </li> <li>Give your child the dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of belladonna and opium?</h2> <p>Call your doctor if your child continues to have any of these signs or symptoms:</p> <ul><li>trouble having a bowel movement (constipation) </li> <li>upset stomach, <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">throwing up</a></li> <li>tiredness </li> <li>a dry mouth or throat </li> <li>rash, itching </li></ul> <p>Contact your doctor immediately if your child has:</p> <ul><li>blurred vision </li> <li>nervousness </li> <li>confusion </li> <li>dizziness </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=894&language=English">fast heartbeat</a></li></ul><h2>What other important information should I know about belladonna and opium?</h2><ul><li>This medicine may cause <a>constipation</a> (trouble having a bowel movement), especially if your child takes it regularly. To help prevent this, it is important for your child to eat a <a>well-balanced diet which includes fibre</a>, for example fruits, vegetables, and cereal. Your child'should also drink extra liquid while taking this medicine. </li><li>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicine (prescribed or not prescribed). Some cold or allergy medicines may cause your child to be more drowsy. </li><li>Keep the whole suppositories at room temperature, away from heat. Keep the 1/2 or 1/4 suppositories in the refrigerator.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
BleomycinBBleomycinBleomycinEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh56.00000000000009.000000000000001084.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called bleomycin. This information sheet explains what bleomycin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called bleomycin (say: blee-oh-MYE-sin). This information sheet explains what bleomycin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving bleomycin to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to bleomycin or any other medication.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, chickenpox) </li> <li>a history of liver or kidney problems </li> <li>any lung problems or if anyone in your home smokes </li></ul><h2>How will your child get bleomycin?</h2> <p>Bleomycin is a clear liquid that is usually given by needle into your child's vein (intravenously or IV). Usually your child will get this medicine in the hospital clinic or nursing unit. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of bleomycin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take bleomycin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>darkening or thickening of skin </li> <li>dark stripes on skin </li> <li>itching of skin </li> <li>skin rash or coloured bumps on fingertips, elbows, or palms </li> <li>skin redness or tenderness </li> <li>swelling of fingers </li> <li>nausea (stomach upset) or vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>changes in fingernails or toenails </li> <li>loss of appetite or weight loss </li> <li>hair loss </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>cough </li> <li>shortness of breath or trouble breathing </li> <li>sores in mouth and on lips </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>fever and chills </li> <li>cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, or trouble breathing </li> <li>unusual bruising or bleeding </li> <li>confusion </li> <li>feeling faint or weak </li> <li>chest pain that is sudden and severe </li> <li>weakness in arms or legs that appears suddenly </li></ul> <p><strong>After your child stops bleomycin treatment</strong>, it may still produce some side effects that need attention. During this period of time, <strong>check with your doctor right away</strong> if you notice any of the following: </p> <ul><li>cough, shortness of breath, or trouble breathing </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using bleomycin?</h2> <p>Your child's skin may darken while receiving bleomycin, especially on elbows and knees and in skin creases. If this happens, it will slowly fade once your child stops taking bleomycin. </p> <p>Your child may lose their hair. It will grow back once treatment with bleomycin stops. Its colour and texture may change. Use a gentle shampoo and a soft brush. </p> <p>Bleomycin may cause sores in the mouth. Rinse your child's mouth with a mouthwash made from baking soda to help keep it clean. Your nurse or pharmacist can review this with you. Avoid store-bought mouthwash as it may sting and cause dry mouth. </p> <p>Bleomycin can damage your child's lungs. Smoking cigarettes when taking bleomycin may increase your child's chance of lung problems, such as coughing, shortness of breath, and wheezing. Tell your doctor if your child smokes or if people in your household smoke. </p> <p>Your child may have some lung tests while getting bleomycin and after they finish bleomycin treatment.</p> <p>Pressurized oxygen can increase the risk of lung problems after treatment with bleomycin. Before your child ever has any kind of operation, even years after treatment with bleomycin, it is very important that the doctor or dentist be aware that your child got bleomycin. Consider getting your child a Medic-Alert bracelet or necklace that says they have taken bleomycin. Your child should avoid activities that require extra oxygen, such as scuba diving, for the rest of their life. </p> <p>There is a chance that bleomycin may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving bleomycin. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mump, and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccine. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about bleomycin?</h2><ul><li>Tell the doctor or dentist that your child is being treated with bleomycin before your child has any operation, even on the teeth, or any emergency treatment. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Budesonide for inhalationBBudesonide for inhalationBudesonide for inhalationEnglishPharmacyNANARespiratory systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-15T04:00:00Z60.00000000000008.00000000000000957.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called budesonide. This information sheet explains what budesonide does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called budesonide (say: byoo-DES-oh-nide). This information sheet explains what budesonide does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving budesonide to your child?</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has:</p> <ul><li>An allergy to budesonide </li></ul> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>Infections, such as chicken pox, measles, tuberculosis </li> <li>Eye problems, such as glaucoma </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child budesonide?</h2> <ul><li>Give your child budesonide exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Stop giving budesonide only if your doctor or pharmacist tells you to stop. </li> <li>Give your child budesonide at the same time every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>If your child uses a reliever medicine, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=234&language=English">salbutamol</a>, make sure your child uses the reliever medicine before using the budesonide. You should wait 5 minutes after giving the reliever medicine before you give the budesonide. </li> <li>If your child uses a nebulizer machine to take the budesonide, you can mix the reliever medicine with the budesonide liquid. </li> <li>Your child needs to breathe the budesonide in through the mouth. If you are not sure how to give this medicine, ask the pharmacist or nurse to show you. </li> <li>Have your child rinse their mouth with water after taking budesonide. If your child is too young to rinse, give them water or juice to drink after every dose of budesonide. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of budesonide?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does budesonide take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several weeks before you notice that your child's asthma is getting better with budesonide.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of budesonide?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take budesonide. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>Dry mouth or throat </li> <li>Sore throat </li> <li>A bad taste in the mouth </li> <li>Cough </li> <li>Headache </li> <li>Upset stomach </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>White patches in the mouth </li> <li>Pain while eating or swallowing </li> <li>Blurry vision or any changes in vision </li></ul> <p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </p> <ul><li>Swelling of the face, eyes, lips </li> <li>Tightness in the chest </li> <li>Wheezing, shortness of breath, or trouble breathing that is not relieved by any medication </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using budesonide?</h2> <p>If your child's asthma is not getting better after 2 weeks of taking budesonide, or if you feel it is getting worse, contact your doctor. </p> <p>Gargling and rinsing the mouth with water after each dose will help to prevent hoarseness, throat irritation, and yeast infection in the mouth. </p> <p>Before your child has any kind of surgery, including dental surgery or an emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking budesonide. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about budesonide?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough budesonide to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep budesonide at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight.? ?Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date.? ?Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
BusulfanBBusulfanBusulfanEnglishPharmacyNANARespiratory systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-05-27T04:00:00Z60.00000000000008.000000000000001218.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called busulfan. This information sheet explains what busulfan does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called busulfan (say: byoo-SUL-fan). This information sheet explains what busulfan does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have w hen they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving busulfan to your child?</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to busulfan or any other drug product.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, chickenpox) </li> <li>history of seizures or head injury </li> <li>thalassemia (a type of blood disorder) </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child busulfan?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child busulfan: </p> <ul><li>The injection form of busulfan is normally given. It is a clear liquid that a nurse will give into a vein (intravenously, IV). </li> <li>The amount of busulfan your child gets will depend on how much of the medicine is in the blood after the first dose. </li> <li>If your child is taking busulfan by mouth, your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will review the way to give this. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of busulfan?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take busulfan. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>diarrhea (watery bowel movements) </li> <li>nausea (upset stomach) and vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>loss of appetite </li> <li>weight loss (sudden) </li> <li>muscle pain </li> <li>feeling tired or weak </li> <li>headache </li> <li>skin rash </li> <li>darkening of the skin, especially elbows, knees, and skin folds </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>seizures </li> <li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>blood in urine or stools </li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>pain or trouble urinating </li> <li>very dark coloured urine </li> <li>cough or hoarseness </li> <li>fever or chills </li> <li>pinpoint red spots on skin </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li> <li>chest pain </li> <li>fast or uneven heartbeat </li> <li>shortness of breath or difficulty breathing </li> <li>weight gain, swelling, or puffiness </li> <li>stomach pain </li> <li>sores in the mouth or pain with swallowing </li> <li>yellowing of the skin or eyes </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using busulfan?</h2> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">Acetaminophen</a> (Tylenol) may change the way the body handles busulfan. As a result, your child should try to avoid use of <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> (Tylenol) just before and during the time that busulfan is being given. </p> <p>Grapefruit or grapefruit juice may affect how the body handles busulfan. Your child should avoid having grapefruit, grapefruit juice, or fruit punches with grapefruit juice at any time while they are being treated with busulfan. </p> <p>Busulfan can lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the flu. </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse, or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You and our child shouldn't touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing your or your child's hands first. </li> <li>Your child's nurse and doctor will review with you what to do in case of fever. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine for a period after your child has been treated with busulfan. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mump and rubella (MMR), and chicken pox vaccine. </p> <p>Busulfan can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, fingernail scissors, or toenail clippers. </li> <li>Your child should be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking busulfan. </li></ul> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription or non-prescription or herbal products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about busulfan?</h2><ul><li>Busulfan may cause an upset stomach and throwing up. Your child will get medicine to prevent these problems.</li><li>Your child will get a medicine to prevent seizures while they are taking busulfan.</li><li>Your child may lose their hair. It will grow back once treatment with busulfan stops. Its colour and texture may change. Use a gentle shampoo and a soft brush. </li><li>Your child's skin may darken while receiving busulfan, especially on elbows and knees and in skin creases. If this happens, it will slowly fade once treatment with busulfan stops. </li><li>There is a chance that busulfan may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving busulfan. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </li><li>After receiving busulfan, your child may not be able to have children or have more difficulty having children. Your child's doctor will discuss this in more detail with you and or your child. </li><li>Keep a list of medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CaptoprilCCaptoprilCaptoprilEnglishPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh65.00000000000007.00000000000000889.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called captopril. This information sheet explains what captopril does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called captopril (say: KAP-toe-pril). This information sheet explains what captopril does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving captopril to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child is allergic to captopril or other medicines. </p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. This medicine may not be right for your child if they have: </h3> <ul><li>swelling of eyes, lips, throat, hands, feet (angioedema) </li> <li>kidney disease or kidney transplant </li> <li>high potassium levels (hyperkalemia) </li> <li>liver disease </li> <li>diabetes </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child captopril?</h2> <p>Give your child this medicine:</p> <ul><li>regularly, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you </li> <li>on an empty stomach, 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals with a full glass of liquid </li></ul> <p>A tablet may need to be dissolved in water so that a smaller dose can be given. Please read the <a href="/Article?contentid=991&language=English">"Dissolve and Dose" Med-Aid</a> that explains how to do this. </p><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of captopril?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child 2 doses to make up for 1 missed dose. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of captopril?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take captopril. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>dry cough </li> <li>headache </li> <li>loss of taste </li> <li>unusual tiredness </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>unexplained <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> or chills </li> <li>sore throat or hoarseness that does not go away </li> <li>swollen hands, ankles, feet, or legs </li> <li>sudden trouble in swallowing or breathing, shortness of breath </li> <li>numbness or tingling in hands, feet, or lips </li> <li>rash or itchy skin </li> <li>swelling of the face, tongue, or lips </li> <li>continuing dizziness or light-headedness </li> <li>any change in the heartbeat, such as faster or slower </li> <li>weakness or heaviness in the legs </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using captopril?</h2> <ul><li>Keep your appointments with the doctor to have your child's blood pressure checked regularly. </li> <li>Your child may feel dizzy or light-headed when they start taking captopril, especially after the first dose. Your child should get out of bed or get up from a sitting position slowly after taking the medicine. Your child should sit or lie down if they feel dizzy. </li> <li>Do not give your child any potassium supplements unless the doctor orders them. </li> <li>Salt substitutes usually contain a lot of potassium and may increase levels of potassium. Do not use salt substitutes. </li> <li>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with captopril or in some cases, the dose of captopril or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor or pharmacist if your child takes any medications (prescription, over the counter, or herbals) including: <ul><li>Other blood pressure medications</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=124&language=English">Digoxin</a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">Ibuprofen</a> (Advil), aspirin, <a href="/Article?contentid=198&language=English">naproxen</a> (Aleve)</li> <li>Lithium</li> <li>Cold and allergy medications</li></ul></li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about captopril?</h2><ul><li>It may take several weeks for captopril to take full effect.</li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Before your child has any kind of surgery, even on the teeth, or an emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking captopril. </li><li>Keep captopril at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CarbamazepineCCarbamazepineCarbamazepineEnglishPharmacyNANANervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA1997-01-27T05:00:00Z57.00000000000008.00000000000000769.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called carbamazepine. This information sheet explains what carbamazepine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called carbamazepine (say: kar-ba-MAZ-e-peen). This information sheet explains what carbamazepine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should I give my child carbamazepine?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child carbamazepine:</p> <ul><li>Give your child carbamazepine regularly, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you to. Avoid missing doses by giving the medicine at the same times each day. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. Make sure you have enough medicine on hand for weekends, holidays, or vacations. </li> <li>Give your child carbamazepine with food, to reduce the chance of an upset stomach. </li> <li>Give your child carbamazepine with the special spoon or syringe the pharmacist gave you, if your child is taking the liquid form of carbamazepine. Be sure to shake the bottle well before each dose. </li> <li>Carbamazepine should be swallowed whole, not crushed or chewed, if your child is taking the long-acting tablets. The long-acting tablets may be cut in half. </li></ul><h2>What should I do if my child misses a dose of carbamazepine?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of the medicine:</p> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as possible. </li> <li>If it is almost time for their next dose, do not give the missed dose. </li> <li>Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give only one dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of carbamazepine?</h2> <p>Your child may be more likely to have these side effects at the beginning of therapy. After a while, these side effects may decrease or go away. Call your doctor if your child continues to have any of these signs or symptoms: </p> <ul><li>dizziness, lightheadedness </li> <li>drowsiness </li> <li>upset stomach, throwing up </li> <li>clumsiness </li> <li>increase or decrease in urination </li> <li>dry mouth </li> <li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li> <li>loss of appetite </li> <li>trouble having a bowel movement (constipation) </li></ul> <h3>Call your doctor immediately if your child has:</h3> <ul><li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>dark urine </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li> <li>blurred vision </li> <li>skin rash, hives </li> <li>cough </li> <li>unexplained sore throat </li> <li>hoarseness </li> <li>swollen or painful glands </li> <li>change in behaviour </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>yellow eyes or skin </li> <li>bone or joint pain </li></ul><h2>What other important information should I know about carbamazepine?</h2><ul><li>Carbamazepine may make your child's skin more likely to sunburn. When going outside, your child must cover up with clothing and a hat or wear a sunscreen. Look for a sunscreen?that protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays, with an SPF of at least 15. Ask your pharmacist to help you pick the right sunscreen. </li><li>Carbamazepine may make your child dizzy, drowsy, or less alert than normal, especially in the beginning of therapy. Tell your child's teacher that they are taking this medication. </li><li>This medication may affect blood sugar levels. If your child has diabetes, call your doctor if you notice a change in the results of blood or urine sugar tests. </li><li>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office and for blood tests so that your child's response to carbamazepine can be checked. </li><li>Before your child has any kind of surgery, including dental surgery or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking carbamazepine. </li><li>Check with your doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicine (prescribed or not prescribed). Make sure that the doctor or pharmacist knows your child is taking carbamazepine, so that any possible drug interactions can be avoided. </li><li>Keep this medication in a tightly closed container in a dry place. Heat and moisture may cause the medicine to breakdown and be less effective. Throw away any carbamazepine which you do not use.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CarboplatinCCarboplatinCarboplatinEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh59.00000000000008.000000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called carboplatin. This information sheet explains what carboplatin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called carboplatin (say: KAR-boe-pla-tin). This information sheet explains what carboplatin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving carboplatin to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to carboplatin, cisplatin, or any other medications, foods, preservatives, or colouring agents. </p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>an infection or recent exposure to infection (for example chickenpox) </li> <li>hearing problems </li> <li>a history of kidney problems </li></ul><h2>How will your child get carboplatin?</h2> <p>Carboplatin is a clear liquid a nurse will give by needle into your child's vein (intravenously or IV). Your child will get this medicine in the hospital clinic or on a nursing unit. </p> <p>Your child's doctor may want your child to drink plenty of liquids on the day they get carboplatin. This will help prevent kidney problems. Your doctor will tell you how much your child needs to drink. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of carboplatin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take carboplatin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>upset stomach and throwing up </li> <li>feeling tired or weak </li> <li>diarrhea (watery or loose stools) </li> <li>constipation (trouble having a bowel movement) </li> <li>loss of appetite </li> <li>hair loss </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>pain, redness or swelling where the needle was put in </li> <li>numbness or tingling in fingers or toes </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>blurred vision </li> <li>ringing in ears or changes in hearing </li> <li>sores in the mouth or on the lips </li> <li>swelling of feet or lower legs </li> <li>urinating less often </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>rash or itching of the skin </li> <li>swelling of the face or lips </li> <li>tightness in the throat or difficulty breathing </li> <li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>blood in urine or stools </li> <li>cough or hoarseness </li> <li>fever or chills </li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>painful or difficult urination </li> <li>pinpoint red spots on skin </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using carboplatin?</h2> <p>Your child's doctor will order blood and hearing tests to check for problems while your child is getting carboplatin.</p> <p>Your child will get some medicine to prevent an upset stomach and throwing up caused by carboplatin.</p> <p>Your child may lose their hair. It will grow back once treatment with carboplatin stops. Its colour and texture may change. Use a gentle shampoo and a soft brush on your child's hair. </p> <p>Carboplatin may cause sores in the mouth. Rinse your child's mouth with a mouthwash made from baking soda to help keep it clean. Your nurse or pharmacist can review this with you. Avoid store-bought mouthwash, as it may sting and cause dry mouth. </p> <p>Carboplatin can lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the "flu." </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You/your child shouldn't touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing you/your child's hands first. </li> <li>Your child should not receive a permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Your child's nurse and doctor will review with you what to do when you child has a fever. </li></ul> <p>Carboplatin can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, fingernail scissors or toenail clippers. </li> <li>Be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, or any emergency treatment, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking carboplatin. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccine. </p> <p>There is a chance that carboplatin may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving carboplatin. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>After receiving carboplatin, your child may not be able to have children or have more difficulty having children. Your child's doctor will discuss this in more detail with you/your child. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about carboplatin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CarmustineCCarmustineCarmustineEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-02-24T05:00:00ZJennifer Drynan-Arsenault, BSc, RPh, ACPRElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh62.00000000000008.000000000000001277.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called carmustine. This information sheet explains what carmustine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called carmustine (say: kar-MUS-teen). This information sheet explains what carmustine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving carmustine to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to carmustine or to any other medication.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection (for example, chickenpox) </li> <li>history of lung problems </li> <li>kidney or liver problems </li></ul><h2>How do you give your child get carmustine?</h2> <p>Carmustine is a clear, colorless to light yellow liquid that the nurse will inject into the vein slowly, usually over one or two hours. Carmustine is given in the hospital clinic or on the nursing unit. </p> <p>If carmustine leaks out of the vein through which it is being given, it can cause severe damage. Tell the nurse right away if you notice redness, pain, or swelling at the place of injection. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of carmustine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take carmustine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>nausea (upset stomach) and vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>change in skin colour along the vein where carmustine was given </li> <li>facial flushing (face may get red and feel warm) </li> <li>diarrhea (loose, watery stools) </li> <li>skin rash or itching </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>swelling of lower legs or feet </li> <li>dry cough or shortness of breath </li> <li>yellow coloured skin or eyes </li> <li>sores on lips, tongue, mouth, or throat </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>chest pain and shortness of breath or trouble breathing </li> <li>signs of infection, such as a fever or chills, cough, or sore throat </li> <li>pain in the lower back or side </li> <li>black tarry stools </li> <li>blood in the urine </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li> <li>pain, burning, or stinging when the medicine was given </li> <li>severe dizziness or loss of balance </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using carmustine?</h2> <p>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check your child's reaction to carmustine. The doctor may need to change the dose so that your child is getting the right amount. </p> <p>Your child will get medicine to prevent an upset stomach and throwing up.</p> <p>Smoking may increase the risk of side effects that affect the lungs, such as cough and shortness of breath. </p> <p>Carmustine may lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the "flu". </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse, or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You and your child shouldn't touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing your or your child's hands first. </li> <li>Your child should not receive permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Your child's nurse and doctor will review with you what to do when your child has a fever. </li></ul> <p>Carmustine can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, scissors, or clippers to cut their nails or hair. </li> <li>Your child should be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Your child should not receive a permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking carmustine. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mump and rubella (MMR), and chicken pox vaccine. </p> <p>There is a chance that carmustine may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving carmustine. Tell your doctor right away if you think your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>After receiving carmustine, your child may not be able to have children or have more difficulty having children. Your child's doctor will discuss this in more detail with you and your child. </p> <p>After your child stops receiving carmustine, it may still cause side effects. These delayed effects may include certain types of cancer. Check with your doctor right away if any of the following signs occur even after carmustine treatment has stopped: </p> <ul><li>yellow eyes or skin</li> <li>black tarry stools </li> <li>blood in urine or stools</li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>stomach pain</li> <li>cough or a hoarse voice </li> <li>unusual bleeding, bruising</li> <li>severe diarrhea </li></ul> <p>Your child may lose their hair. It will grow back once treatment with carmustine stops. Its colour and texture may change. Use a gentle shampoo and a soft brush on your child's hair. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about carmustine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CarvedilolCCarvedilolCarvedilolEnglishPharmacyNANACardiovascular systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2002-05-23T04:00:00Z63.00000000000008.00000000000000717.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called carvedilol. This information sheet explains what carvedilol does and how to give it. It also explains what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called carvedilol (say: KAR-ve-dil-ole). This information sheet explains what carvedilol does and how to give it. It also explains what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child carvedilol?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child carvedilol:</p> <ul><li>Give your child carvedilol for as long as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems well. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. Make sure you have enough carvedilol for weekends, holidays, and vacations. </li> <li>Give your child carvedilol at the same time(s) every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Give your child carvedilol with food or milk. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of carvedilol?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of carvedilol:</p> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. </li> <li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of carvedilol?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take carvedilol. Usually your child will not need to see a doctor about them. These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to carvedilol. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>dizziness </li> <li>drowsiness </li> <li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li> <li>nausea </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>any change in heart beat such as faster, slower, or uneven heart beats </li> <li>difficulty breathing, wheezing </li> <li>swelling of feet, ankles, or legs </li> <li>skin rash </li> <li>chest pain </li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about carvedilol?</h2><ul><li>Tell your doctor if your child has asthma or any problems with breathing. Tell your doctor if your child has ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to carvedilol or any other medicines. </li><li>Tell your doctor if your child has diabetes. Carvedilol may cause changes in blood sugar levels.</li><li>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before you give your child any other medicine, even medicines you can buy without a doctor's order (prescription). </li><li>Before your child has any kind of surgery, even on the teeth, or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking carvedilol. </li><li>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office, so that the doctor can check your child's reaction to carvedilol.</li><li>This medicine may make your child dizzy, drowsy, or less alert than normal. Watch carefully when your child is doing something that they need to be alert for, such as climbing stairs. </li><li>To help avoid dizziness, your child'should get out of bed or get up from a sitting position slowly. Your child'should sit down or lie down if they feel dizzy. If this problem continues or gets worse, call your child's doctor.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CaspofunginCCaspofunginCaspofunginEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-01-25T05:00:00Z​​Jacqueline Flank, BScPharm, MSc, RPh, ACPR;Ari Bitnun, MD, MSc, FRCPC;Lillian Sung, MD, PhD, FRCPC​55.00000000000009.00000000000000687.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called caspofungin. This information sheet explains what caspofungin does, how it is given and what side effects or problems your child may have when they receive this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called caspofungin (say: kas-poe-FUN-jin). This information sheet explains what caspofungin does, how it is given and what side effects or problems your child may have when they receive this medicine.</p><h2>Before your child receives caspofungin</h2> <p>Tell your child’s doctor or health-care provider if your child has:</p> <ul> <li>an allergy to caspofungin or any ingredient in this medicine</li> </ul> <h3>Talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has:</h3> <ul> <li>liver problems</li> </ul><h2>How is caspofungin given?</h2> <p>Your child’s first dose of caspofungin will likely be given in the hospital or in clinic. A nurse will use a medication pump to give your child caspofungin intravenously.</p><h2>How long does caspofungin take to work?</h2> <p>The time it takes for caspofungin to start working depends on why your child is receiving caspofungin. Serious fungal infections may require treatment for a longer period of time. The doctor will decide how long your child should receive caspofungin based on your child’s medical condition, lab results and response to caspofungin.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of caspofungin?</h2> <p>Your child may experience some of these side effects while they receive caspofungin. Check with your child’s doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away or if they bother your child: </p> <ul> <li>pain, redness or swelling at the needle site</li> <li>headache</li> <li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li> <li>fever</li> <li>chills</li> </ul> <h3>The following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. If your child has any of these side effects, tell the nurse or doctor immediately:</h3> <ul> <li>signs of an allergic reaction, including wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness or chest pain, difficulty breathing, fever, itching, bad cough, blue skin colour, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat</li> <li>rash or hives (red raised spots on the skin)</li> <li>yellowing of the eyes and/or skin, dark urine or stomach pain (signs of liver problems)</li> </ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is receiving caspofungin?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with caspofungin. In some cases the dose of caspofungin or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter and herbal) including: </p> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=115&language=English">cyclosporine</a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=231&language=English">rifampin</a></li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=244&language=English">tacrolimus</a></li> </ul><h2>What other important information should you know about caspofungin?</h2><ul><li>The doctor will check your child’s blood on a regular basis while they are receiving caspofungin. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child’s medicine with others and do not give anyone else’s medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CefaclorCCefaclorCefaclorEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-23T04:00:00Z62.00000000000007.00000000000000631.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cefaclor for an infection. This information sheet explains what cefaclor does, how to take it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cefaclor (say: SEF-a-klor) for an infection. This information sheet explains what cefaclor does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child cefaclor?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child cefaclor:</p> <ul><li>Give your child cefaclor for as long as your doctor or pharmacist (druggist) tells you, even if your child seems better. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving cefaclor for any reason. </li> <li>Give your child cefaclor at the same times every day, exactly as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you. Pick a time that is easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Give your child cefaclor with or without food. If cefaclor upsets your child's stomach, give this medicine with food. </li> <li>Give your child cefaclor after shaking the bottle well, if your child is taking liquid cefaclor. </li> <li>Give your child cefaclor with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you, if your child is taking liquid cefaclor. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of cefaclor?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of cefaclor:</p> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. </li> <li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of cefaclor?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cefaclor. Usually your child will not need to see the doctor about them. These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to cefaclor. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor if your child has any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li> <li>cramps and pain in the stomach </li> <li>an upset stomach, throwing up </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>a rash, itchy skin, or hives (raised red, itchy areas on the skin) </li> <li>a swollen face </li> <li>problems breathing </li> <li>a new fever or a fever that does not get better </li> <li>blistering, peeling skin </li> <li>pain in the joints such as the knees, shoulders, or knuckles </li></ul> <p>Also, call your doctor if your child does not get any better within 2 days, or your child is getting worse.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about cefaclor?</h2><ul><li>Tell your child's doctor if your child has ever had any unusual reaction to cefaclor or any other medicine.</li><li>Store liquid cefaclor in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine.</li><li>Throw away any cefaclor that you have not used. Throw away any cefaclor that is out of date.</li></ul><br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CefiximeCCefiximeCefiximeEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-04-23T04:00:00Z61.00000000000008.00000000000000666.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cefixime for an infection. This information sheet explains what cefixime does, how to take it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cefixime (say: sef-IKS-eem) for an infection. This information sheet explains what cefixime does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>How should you give your child cefixime?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child cefixime:</p> <ul><li>Give your child cefixime regularly, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist (druggist) tells you to, even if your child seems well. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving cefixime for any reason. </li> <li>Give cefixime with or without food. If cefixime upsets your child's stomach, give this medicine with food. </li> <li>Shake the bottle well before you give your child the medicine, if your child is taking liquid cefixime. </li> <li>Measure the doses with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you, if your child is taking liquid cefixime. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of cefixime?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of cefixime:</p> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. </li> <li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only 1 dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of cefixime?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cefixime. Usually your child will not need to see the doctor about them. These side effects may go away as your child's body gets used to cefixime. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor if your child has any of these signs or symptoms and they do not go away or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) </li> <li>mild stomach cramps </li> <li>an upset stomach, throwing up </li> <li>a sore mouth or tongue </li> <li>an itch in the vagina or liquid draining from the vagina </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>a new fever or a fever that does not get better </li> <li>cramps or severe pain in or around the stomach </li> <li>severe watery bowel movements that have blood in them </li> <li>a rash, itchy skin, swelling, or hives (raised, red, itchy areas on the skin) </li> <li>blistering, peeling skin </li> <li>problems breathing </li> <li>dizziness </li> <li>seizures (fits) </li> <li>pain in the joints such as the knees, shoulders, or knuckles </li> <li>peeing, or urinating, less often </li> <li>no appetite </li> <li>yellow eyes or skin </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li></ul> <p>Also, call your doctor if your child does not get any better within 2 days or your child is getting worse.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about cefixime?</h2><ul><li>Tell your child's doctor if your child has ever had an unusual reaction to cefixime or any other medicine.</li><li>Do not store liquid cefixime in the refrigerator.</li><li>Throw away any cefixime that you have not used. Throw away any cefixime that is out of date.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CephalexinCCephalexinCephalexinEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00Z58.00000000000008.00000000000000938.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cephalexin. This information sheet explains what cephalexin does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cephalexin (say: sef-a-LEKS-in). This information sheet explains what cephalexin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving cephalexin to your child</h2><p>Tell your doctor if your child has:</p><ul><li>an allergy to cephalexin, cephalosporin antibiotics, or <a href="/Article?contentid=212&language=English">penicillin</a> antibiotics </li></ul><h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3><ul><li> kidney disease<br></li></ul><h2>How should you give your child cephalexin?</h2> <ul><li>Give your child cephalexin for as long as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems well. </li> <li>Give your child cephalexin with or without food. However, cephalexin may cause an upset stomach and you may find that giving it with food may prevent this. </li> <li>If your child cannot swallow tablets, there is a liquid medicine available. If your child is taking liquid cephalexin, shake the bottle well before each dose and measure the dose with the special spoon or oral syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li> <li>Give at regular intervals and at the same times each day, exactly as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of cephalexin?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does cephalexin take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several days for your child to start feeling better after starting this medicine. It may also take several further days before the full benefit is seen. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of cephalexin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cephalexin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>upset stomach, including stomach pain, heartburn, watery bowel movements (diarrhea), <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">throwing up</a> </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat </li> <li>severe dizziness or passing out </li> <li>difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, or bad cough </li> <li>severe nausea or vomiting (throwing up) or severe watery diarrhea (watery bowel movements) which may have blood or red streaks </li> <li>unusual bruising or bleeding </li> <li>severe skin rash, itching </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using cephalexin?</h2> <p>Cephalexin can cause diarrhea. Bloody diarrhea or diarrhea with fever may be a sign of a serious infection. Talk to your doctor first before giving any medicine for diarrhea. </p> <p>If your child is diabetic and uses urine glucose tests, some of these tests may give false or incorrect results. Check with your pharmacist about what other glucose tests may be used. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products). </p> <p>Medicines that make the blood thinner, such as warfarin or heparin, may not work properly if your child is taking cephalexin.</p> <p>Birth control medicines may not work properly while taking cephalexin and for 7 days after the course of antibiotics is finished. If your child takes birth control pills, please tell her doctor/pharmacist. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about cephalexin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough cephalexin to finish the prescribed course. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills if necessary. </li><li>Keep cephalexin tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store cephalexin tablets in the bathroom or kitchen. </li><li>Keep cephalexin liquid in the refrigerator. Do not freeze this medicine. Discard any unused liquid after 2 weeks.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Chloral HydrateCChloral HydrateChloral HydrateEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2011-03-04T05:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh67.00000000000007.00000000000000984.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called chloral hydrate. This information sheet explains what chloral hydrate does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when she takes this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called chloral hydrate (say: KLOR-al HYE-drate). This information sheet explains what chloral hydrate does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when she takes this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving chloral hydrate to your child </h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if she has an allergy to chloral hydrate or any other medicines. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine. Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if she has any of the following conditions:<br></p> <ul><li>heart disease</li> <li>liver or kidney disease</li> <li>stomach irritation or ulcers</li> <li>breathing problems or sleep apnea<br></li></ul><h2>How should you give your child chloral hydrate?</h2><p>Give your child chloral hydrate exactly as the doctor or pharmacist tells you.</p><p>Talk to your child's doctor before you change the dose or stop giving this medicine for any reason.<br>If giving chloral hydrate by mouth:</p><ul><li>Measure the liquid carefully. Use a proper measuring device such as an oral syringe, medicine dropper, medicine spoon, or medicine cup. </li><li>You can mix chloral hydrate with water, infant formula, fruit juice, or ginger ale to help with the taste of the medicine.</li><li>Children with feeding tubes can also take the medicine. Make sure to flush the feeding tube before and after each dose.</li><li>Chloral hydrate liquid can be given rectally. In the hospital, a nurse may give the medicine rectally. If you are to give the medicine rectally at home, a nurse or pharmacist will show you how. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of chloral hydrate?</h2><ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li><li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time.</li><li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose.</li><li>This medicine is often given on an as-needed basis.<br></li></ul><h2>How long does chloral hydrate take to work?</h2> <p>Chloral hydrate works quickly after your child has a dose. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of chloral hydrate?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while she takes chloral hydrate. Check with your child's doctor if she continues to have any of these side effects, especially if they do not go away or if they bother her: </p> <p></p> <ul><li>dizziness</li> <li>feeling sleepy</li> <li>feeling confused or less alert</li> <li>nausea and vomiting</li> <li>diarrhea<br></li></ul> <p>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take her to the nearest Emergency Department if she has any of these side effects: </p> <ul><li>trouble breathing</li> <li>a rash or hives appear</li> <li>feeling extremely weak or tired<br></li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using chloral hydrate?<br></h2> <p>If your child has been taking this medicine for several weeks, talk to her doctor before stopping the medicine. The doctor may want to reduce the dose of the medicine slowly. </p> <p>Chloral hydrate may cause your child to be dizzy, drowsy, or less alert. Have your child avoid activities that require her to be alert, such as riding a bicycle, rollerblading, or contact sports. School work may be more difficult for your child to focus on, so tell her teacher that she is taking this medicine. </p> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with chloral hydrate, or in some cases the dose of chloral hydrate or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over-the-counter, or herbal), including: </p> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a>, a medication that thins the blood</li> <li>other medicines that can cause drowsiness, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=215&language=English">phenobarbital,</a> <a href="/Article?contentid=258&language=English">valproic acid</a>, and <a href="/Article?contentid=176&language=English">lorazepam</a><br></li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about chloral hydrate?<br></h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough chloral hydrate to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep chloral hydrate at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CholestyramineCCholestyramineCholestyramineEnglishPharmacyNANARenal system/Urinary system;Digestive systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh56.00000000000008.00000000000000928.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cholestyramine. This information sheet explains what cholestyramine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when he takes this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cholestyramine (say: koe-LES-teer-a-meen). This information sheet explains what cholestyramine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when he takes this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving cholestyramine to your child</h2> <p>Tell your child's doctor if your child is allergic to cholestyramine or any ingredient in its formulation. </p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>kidney or liver disease </li> <li>thyroid disease </li> <li>bleeding problems </li> <li>phenylketonuria (PKU) </li> <li>constipation or hemorrhoids </li> <li>gallbladder disease </li> <li>stomach ulcer or other stomach problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child cholestyramine?</h2><ul><li>Give this medicine exactly as your doctor or your pharmacist tells you to, even if your child seems better. </li><li>Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids each day, unless told to drink less fluid by a healthcare provider. Make sure these fluids do not contain caffeine. </li><li>The powder must be mixed with liquid before giving to your child. Avoid ingesting or breathing in the dried powder. </li><li>Mix with 60 to 180 mL (¼ to ¾ of a cup) water, milk, fruit juice, broth, or other noncarbonated beverage. The powder may also be mixed into soups or pulpy fruits such as apple sauce or crushed pineapple because of their high moisture content. </li><li>Let stand for 1 to 2 minutes before giving. </li><li>Cholestyramine should be given at mealtime </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of cholestyramine?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long should it take for cholestyramine to work?</h2> <p>In some conditions cholestyramine may take up to one month to work.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of cholestyramine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while he takes cholestyramine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>belly pain </li> <li>nausea or vomiting; small frequent meals may help </li> <li>headache </li> <li>constipation; more liquids, regular exercise, or a fiber-containing diet may help. Talk with a health care provider about a stool softener or laxative. </li> <li>bloating and gas (this should subside with time) </li> <li>diarrhea </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>severe belly pain </li> <li>severe constipation </li> <li>severe diarrhea </li> <li>unusual bruising or bleeding </li> <li>rash, difficulty breathing, or any other sign of an allergic reaction</li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using cholestyramine?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with cholestyramine. In some cases the dose of cholestyramine or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. Cholestyramine binds to many other medicines if they are taken at the same time. It is important that your child does not take any other medicines one hour before, or four to six hours after cholestyramine, unless your doctor or pharmacist tells you they can be given together.</p> <p>Cholestyramine can also reduce the absorption of certain vitamins (in particular, vitamin A, K, and D) as well as folic acid. </p> <p>It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medicines (prescription, over-the-counter, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about cholestyramine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medicines your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough cholestyramine to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least two days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep cholestyramine at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do not store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines. </li></ul><br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
Ciprodex Ear Drops: How to put inCCiprodex Ear Drops: How to put inCiprodex Ear Drops: How to put inEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2013-04-01T04:00:00ZCarleigh Carter, RN Kathy Eres, RN Kaitlin Fulford, RN Ashley Jorge, RN Faith Na, RN Vandana Patel, RN,MN Tory Sageloy, RN Marc Trinidad, RN000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child's doctor prescribed a medicine called Ciprodex ear drops to prevent and treat your child's ear infection. This information sheet explains what Ciprodex is, how to give it, and its possible side effects.</p><p>Your child's doctor prescribed a medicine called Ciprodex ear drops to prevent and treat your child's ear infection. This information sheet explains what Ciprodex is, how to give it, and its possible side effects.</p><h2>Before giving Ciprodex to your child </h2> <p>Tell the doctor if your child has ever had any unusual or allergic reactions to Ciprodex, ciprofloxacin, dexamethasone or any other medications. </p> <p>Keep in mind the expiry date on the Ciprodex bottle. </p><h2>How to give Ciprodex ear drops</h2> <ol><li><a href="/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Wash hands</a> with soap and water.</li> <li>Warm the bottle by holding it in your hands for 1 to 2 minutes. Then shake well.</li> <li>Ask your child to lie on their side with the infected ear up. The tip of the bottle should not touch the fingers, ear, or any other surface.</li> <li>Pull the outer ear lobe upward and backward. This will allow the drops to flow down into the ear canal.</li> <li>If your child has a hole in the ear drum, or a middle ear infection with tubes, press the tragus 5 times in a pumping motion. The tragus is the skin flap in the center of the ear (above the earlobe). This will allow the drops to pass through the tube in the eardrum and into the middle ear.</li> <li>Squeeze the bottle gently to drop the required number of drops into the ear.</li> <li>Your child should stay on their side for 60 seconds.</li> <li>Repeat the process with the other ear if needed.</li> <li>After finishing, wash your hands with soap and water.</li></ol><h2>What to do if your child misses a dose </h2> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember.</li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose.</li> <li>Give your child the next dose at the regular time.</li> <li>Give your child only one dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>Possible side effects of Ciprodex </h2> <ul><li>Ear discomfort or pain </li> <li>Ear precipitate or residue </li> <li>Ear discharge </li> <li>Altered taste </li> <li>Ear congestion </li></ul><h2>When to see a doctor </h2> <p>If your child has a reaction to the ear drops, or your child's ear condition worsens, tell the doctor who prescribed the medicine. </p> <p>The name of my child's doctor is: ___________________________________________ </p> <p>The phone number is: ____________________________________________________ </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CiprofloxacinCCiprofloxacinCiprofloxacinEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh53.00000000000008.000000000000001081.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p>Your child needs to take the medicine called ciprofloxacin. This information sheet explains what ciprofloxacin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called ciprofloxacin (say:sip-row-FLOX-a-sin). This information sheet explains what ciprofloxacin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving ciprofloxacin to your child<br></h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has an allergy to ciprofloxacin or other quinolone antibiotics </p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=845&language=English">epilepsy</a> or a history of seizures </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=870&language=English">glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency</a> </li> <li>kidney or liver disease </li> <li>myasthenia gravis (muscle disease) or a history of tendonitis (swelling of the tissue that connects the muscle to the bone) </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child ciprofloxacin?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child ciprofloxacin:</p> <ul><li>Give your child ciprofloxacin exactly as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you to, even if your child seems better. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving ciprofloxacin for any reason. </li> <li>Give your child ciprofloxacin at the same times every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss any doses. </li> <li>Ciprofloxacin may be given with or without food, however if this medicine causes an upset stomach, give it with food.</li> <li>If your child is prescribed the long-acting tablets they must swallow these tablets whole. Do not crush, chew or break the long acting tablets.</li> <li>Do not give ciprofloxacin at the same time as milk, dairy products, or any juice containing calcium. Also avoid giving ciprofloxacin at the same time as antacids, iron, calcium, zinc or multivitamin supplements. Your child may take ciprofloxacin at least 2 hours before or 6 hours after taking these products.</li> <li>If your child is taking liquid ciprofloxacin, store it in the fridge or at room temperature. Shake the medicine well before each use and measure the dose with the special spoon or oral syringe that the pharmacist gave you.</li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of ciprofloxacin?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does ciprofloxacin take to work?</h2> <p>Your child may begin to feel better soon after starting ciprofloxacin. It may take several days before the full benefit is seen. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of ciprofloxacin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take ciprofloxacin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>upset stomach, including throwing up, mild diarrhea (watery bowel movements), and stomach ache </li> <li>drowsiness and dizziness </li> <li>headache </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to the Emergency Department if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>wheezing/chest tightness or trouble breathing </li> <li>swelling of the face, lips, tongue, mouth, or throat </li> <li>irregular or uneven heartbeat </li> <li>fainting or passing out </li> <li>changes in eyesight such as blurry vision </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>severe aches/pain in the muscles or joints, particularly in the legs </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using ciprofloxacin?</h2> <p>Your child may sunburn more easily than normal while taking ciprofloxacin. To help prevent sunburn:</p> <ul><li>Avoid direct sunlight, especially between 10 am to 3 pm</li> <li>Avoid sunlamps, bright indoor lights, and tanning beds </li> <li>Wear a broad-rimmed hat, long sleeves, long pants, or skirt outside </li> <li>Apply a sun block with a SPF 15 or higher </li></ul> <p>It is also important that your child drinks enough liquids (water or juice) while on ciprofloxacin (6-8 glasses per day).</p> <p>Ciprofloxacin may very rarely cause swelling, redness, pain, or tearing of tendons (cord that attaches muscles to bones). Check with your doctor if your child gets a sudden pain in the ankle, back of the knee, back of the leg, shoulder, elbow, or wrist after playing or exercise. </p> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with ciprofloxacin or in some cases the dose of ciprofloxacin or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter, and herbal) including: </p> <ul><li>medicines to thin the blood (for example, warfarin, Coumadin) </li> <li>antidepressants </li> <li>cyclosporine </li> <li>theophylline </li> <li>methotrexate </li> <li>glyburide </li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about ciprofloxacin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Keep ciprofloxacin tablets at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen. The liquid may be stored in a fridge or at room temperature. Discard any unused liquid after 2 weeks. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li><li>Make sure you always have enough ciprofloxacin to finish the prescribed course. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills, if necessary. </li></ul><br>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CisaprideCCisaprideCisaprideEnglishPharmacyNANADigestive systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh64.00000000000008.00000000000000912.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cisapride. This information sheet explains what cisapride does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cisapride (say: SIS-a-pride). This information sheet explains what cisapride does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving cisapride to your child<br></h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has an allergy to cisapride </p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>heart disease, especially heart rhythm problems. Cisapride may cause a higher risk of serious heart rhythm problems </li> <li>ulcers or bleeding from the stomach </li> <li>blockage in the intestines (gut) </li> <li>low <a href="/Article?contentid=220&language=English">potassium</a> or calcium or <a href="/Article?contentid=179&language=English">magnesium</a> blood levels </li> <li>kidney disease </li> <li>lung disease </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child cisapride?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child cisapride:</p> <ul><li>Give your child cisapride exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. </li> <li>Give your child cisapride at the same times every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Give cisapride 15 to 30 minutes before meals and at bedtime with a full glass of water. </li> <li>You may crush the tablet or open the capsules and mix the contents with a glass of water or juice as long as your child drinks ALL the liquid immediately after mixing.</li> <li>Your child must not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while they are taking cisapride. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of cisapride?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does cisapride take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several weeks before your child will feel the full benefit of this medication.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of cisapride?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cisapride. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>headache, lightheadedness, dizziness or drowsiness </li> <li>stomach pain </li> <li>watery bowel movements (diarrhea) or trouble having a bowel movement (constipation) </li> <li>dry mouth </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>unexplained throwing up </li> <li>blurred vision or other changes in vision </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>fast or racing heartbeat </li> <li>pounding, irregular, or uneven heartbeat </li> <li>swelling of the face, hands, lower legs, and/or feet </li> <li>unusual weight gain </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using cisapride?</h2> <p>Do not give grapefruit or grapefruit juice to your child while they are taking cisapride. There is risk of serious heart rhythm problems if cisapride and grapefruit are taken. </p> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with cisapride or in some cases the dose of cisapride or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter, or herbal), including: </p> <ul><li>heart medicines including <a href="/Article?contentid=70&language=English">amiodarone</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=124&language=English">digoxin</a> </li> <li>antibiotics including <a href="/Article?contentid=131&language=English">erythromycin</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=104&language=English">clarithromycin</a> </li> <li>antifungals including <a href="/Article?contentid=139&language=English">fluconazole</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=165&language=English">ketoconazole</a>, itraconazole </li> <li>antidepressants including amitriptyline </li> <li>certain antihistamines </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> </li> <li>medications used for AIDS including ritonavir, indinavir, and saquinavir</li> <li>diuretics (medications that increase the flow of urine)</li></ul><h2>What other important information should you know about cisapride?</h2><ul><li>Your child will require an <a href="/Article?contentid=1276&language=English">ECG</a> and other tests prior to and throughout use with cisapride. These tests are done to minimize the risk of heart rhythm problems while taking cisapride. Make sure you keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office. </li><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough cisapride to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 1 week before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep cisapride at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CisplatinCCisplatinCisplatinEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2008-03-25T04:00:00ZElaine Lau, BScPhm, PharmD, MSc, RPh60.00000000000008.000000000000001282.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cisplatin. This information sheet explains what cisplatin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cisplatin (say: SIS-pla-tin). This information sheet explains what cisplatin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving cisplatin to your child</h2> <ul><li>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to cisplatin, carboplatin, or any other medication, dyes, preservatives, or colouring agents. </li></ul> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection (for example chickenpox) </li> <li>hearing problems </li> <li>kidney problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child cisplatin?</h2> <p>Cisplatin is a clear liquid that a nurse will give by needle into your child's vein (intravenously or IV). Cisplatin will be given in the hospital clinic or on a nursing unit. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of cisplatin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cisplatin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>nausea (upset stomach) and vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>sores in mouth or on the lips </li> <li>loose stools </li> <li>change in the way food tastes </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>joint pain </li> <li>loss of balance </li> <li>ringing in the ears </li> <li>changes in hearing </li> <li>swelling of the feet or lower legs </li> <li>loss of reflexes </li> <li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>muscle cramps or tremors (muscle shakiness) </li> <li>numbness or tingling in the fingers or toes </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>pain or redness at place of injection </li> <li>dizziness or faintness during or shortly after the injection </li> <li>fast heartbeat during or shortly after the injection </li> <li>swelling of face during or shortly after the injection </li> <li>wheezing or difficulty breathing </li> <li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>blood in urine or stools </li> <li>fever or chills </li> <li>cough or hoarseness </li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>pinpoint red spots on skin </li> <li>painful or difficult urination </li> <li>decrease in the amount of urine being made </li> <li>unusual bleeding or bruising </li> <li>sudden appearance of a severe headache, changes in eyesight, slurred speech, or trouble in walking or moving part of the body </li> <li>chest pain </li> <li>seizures or loss of consciousness </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using cisplatin?</h2> <p>If cisplatin leaks out of the vein through which it is being given, it can cause irritation or damage. Tell the nurse right away if you or your child notice redness, pain, or swelling at the place of injection. </p> <p>Cisplatin is very likely to cause stomach upset (nausea) and throwing up (vomiting). This can last for up to 5 to 7 days after getting the cisplatin. Your child should receive medicine before and after cisplatin to help with upset stomach and throwing up. </p> <p>After your child has cisplatin, your doctor may want your child to drink plenty of fluids so that your child will pass more urine. This will help prevent kidney problems and keep the kidneys working well. </p> <p>Cisplatin can cause hearing damage. Your child will be scheduled for regular hearing tests called audiograms.</p> <p>Cisplatin may cause sores in the mouth. Rinse your child's mouth with a mouthwash made from baking soda to help keep it clean. Your nurse or pharmacist can review this with you. Avoid store-bought mouthwash, as it may sting and cause dry mouth. </p> <p>Cisplatin can lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the "flu". </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You/your child shouldn't touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing you/your child's hands first. </li> <li>Your child should not receive a permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Your child's nurse will review with you what to do when your child has a fever. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccine. </p> <p>Cisplatin can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, fingernail scissors, or toenail clippers. </li> <li>Be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking cisplatin. </li></ul> <p>There is a chance that cisplatin may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is recommended that they use some kind of birth control while receiving cisplatin. Tell your doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>After receiving cisplatin your child may not be able to have children or have more difficulty having children. Your child's doctor will discuss this in more detail with you/your child. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><h2>What other important information should you know about cisplatin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
CladribineCCladribineCladribineEnglishPharmacyNANANADrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-02-26T05:00:00ZJennifer Drynan-Arsenault, BSc, RPh, ACPR59.00000000000008.000000000000001078.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called cladribine. This information sheet explains what cladribine does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called cladribine (say: KLAD-ri-been). This information sheet explains what cladribine does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving cladribine to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has ever reacted badly to cladribine or any other medication.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>infection or recent exposure to infection, such as chickenpox </li> <li>low blood counts </li> <li>history of liver or kidney problems </li></ul><h2>How will your child get cladribine?</h2> <p>Cladribine is a clear liquid given by the nurse as a needle into your child's vein (intravenously). Your child will get cladribine in the hospital clinic or on the nursing unit. It is usually given slowly over a period of several days. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of cladribine?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take cladribine. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>headache </li> <li>mild nausea (upset stomach) </li> <li>loss of appetite </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>feeling tired </li> <li>diarrhea (watery bowel movements) </li> <li>constipation </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>unusual tiredness or weakness </li> <li>swelling of feet or lower legs </li> <li>numbness or tingling in feet or hands </li> <li>mild skin rash or itching </li> <li>fast heartbeat </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>fever or chills </li> <li>cough or sore throat </li> <li>lower back or side pain </li> <li>pain or difficulty with urination (peeing) </li> <li>redness, pain, or swelling of the skin </li> <li>unusual bruising or bleeding </li> <li>blood in the urine (pee) or stools (poo) </li> <li>black, tarry stools </li> <li>difficulty moving any part of the body </li> <li>shortness of breath or difficulty breathing </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using cladribine?</h2> <p>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check your child's response to cladribine.</p> <p>Cladribine does not usually cause nausea or vomiting. If you child has an upset stomach, let the doctor or nurse know.</p> <p>Hair loss does not usually occur with cladribine.</p> <p>Cladribine can lower the number of white blood cells in the blood temporarily, which increases your child's chances of getting an infection. Your child can take the following precautions to prevent infections, especially when the blood count is low: </p> <ul><li>Avoid people with infections, such as a cold or the flu. </li> <li>Avoid places that are very crowded with large groups of people. </li> <li>Be careful when brushing or flossing your child's teeth. Your doctor, nurse, or dentist may suggest different ways to clean your child's mouth and teeth. </li> <li>You or your child should not touch your child's eyes or inside their nose without washing your hands first. </li> <li>Your child's nurse will review with you what to do in case of fever. </li></ul> <p>Cladribine can lower the number of platelets in the blood, which increases your child's risk of bleeding. You can take the following precautions: </p> <ul><li>Be careful not to cut your child when using a razor, fingernail scissors, or toenail clippers. </li> <li>Be careful when shaving or waxing. </li> <li>Your child should avoid contact sports where bruising or injury could occur. </li> <li>Your child should not receive a permanent tattoo or any kind of body piercing. </li> <li>Before your child has surgery, including dental surgery, inform the doctor or dentist that your child is taking cladribine. </li></ul> <p>Your child should not receive any immunizations (vaccines) without your child's doctor's approval. Your child or anyone else in your household should not get oral polio vaccine while your child is being treated for cancer. Tell your child's doctor if anyone in your household has recently received oral polio vaccine. Your child should avoid contact with anyone who has recently received this vaccine. Other live vaccines that your child should not get include measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccine. </p> <p>There is a chance that cladribine may cause birth defects if it is taken at the time of conception or if it is taken during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active, it is best that they use some kind of birth control while receiving cladribine. Tell the doctor right away if your child may be pregnant. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p> <p>Tell your doctor or dentist that your child is receiving cladribine before your child has any operation, even on teeth, or an emergency treatment. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about cladribine?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
ClarithromycinCClarithromycinClarithromycinEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh56.00000000000009.000000000000001005.00000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called clarithromycin. This information sheet explains what clarithromycin does, how to give it, and what side effects, or problems our child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called clarithromycin (say: kla-RITH-roe-my-sin). This information sheet explains what clarithromycin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving clarithromycin to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child is allergic to clarithromycin, an ingredient in the formulation, or any other antibiotics belonging to the macrolide group. This includes erythromycin and azithromycin. </p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>kidney disease </li> <li>liver disease </li> <li>heart disease </li> <li>myasthenia gravis (neuromuscular disease)</li></ul><h2>How should you give your child clarithromycin?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child clarithromycin:</p> <ul><li>Give your child clarithromycin for as long as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems better. Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. </li> <li>Give your child clarithromycin at regular intervals and the same times every day, exactly as your child's doctor or pharmacist tells you. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Your child may take clarithromycin tablets or liquid with or without food. Give clarithromycin with food if it upsets your child's stomach. </li> <li>If your child is taking the long-acting tablets, they should be swallowed whole and taken with food or milk, not on an empty stomach. Do not break, crush, or chew them. </li> <li>If your child is taking liquid clarithromycin, shake the bottle well before you give your child the medicine. Measure the doses with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. Store the liquid at room temperature in a cool, dark place. Do NOT store in a refrigerator. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of clarithromycin?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does clarithromycin take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several days for your child to start feeling better after starting this medicine. It may also take several further days before the full benefit is seen. </p><h2>What are the possible side effects of clarithromycin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take clarithromycin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>stomach upset, including mild diarrhea (watery bowel movements), cramps or discomfort, throwing up, heartburn or indigestion, feeling bloated, or passing gas </li> <li>headaches </li> <li>change in the taste of food or drink </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>mild skin rash or itchy skin </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>problems breathing, wheezing, or chest tightness </li> <li>swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat </li> <li>severe nausea or vomiting (throwing up), severe diarrhea (watery bowel movements), or abdominal pain </li> <li>blistering, peeling skin or a severe skin rash </li> <li>skin or eyes turning yellow, pale-coloured stools, or dark-coloured urine </li> <li>fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat </li> <li>severe dizziness or fainting </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using clarithromycin?</h2><p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with clarithromycin or in some cases the dose of clarithromycin or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications, including: </p><ul><li>antiepileptic medicines including <a href="/Article?contentid=90&language=English">carbamazepine</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=258&language=English">valproate</a>, and <a href="/Article?contentid=216&language=English">phenytoin</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=215&language=English">phenobarbital</a></li><li>heart medicines including <a href="/Article?contentid=124&language=English">digoxin</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=70&language=English">amiodarone</a> </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=265&language=English">warfarin</a> </li><li>antihistamines </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=115&language=English">cyclosporine</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=244&language=English">tacrolimus</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=237&language=English">sirolimus</a> </li><li>theophylline </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=101&language=English">cisapride</a> </li><li>pimozide</li><li>colchicine </li><li>lovastatin, simvastatin </li><li>ergotamine, dihydroergotamine </li></ul><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p><p>Do not give grapefruit or grapefruit juice to your child while they are taking clarithromycin.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about clarithromycin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough clarithromycin to finish the prescribed course. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills if necessary. </li><li>Keep clarithromycin tablets and liquid at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
ClindamycinCClindamycinClindamycinEnglishPharmacyNANAImmune systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2010-02-26T05:00:00Z59.00000000000008.00000000000000916.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called clindamycin. This information sheet explains what clindamycin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called clindamycin (say: klin-da-MYE-sin). This information sheet explains what clindamycin does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving clindamycin to your child</h2><p>Tell your child's doctor if your child has an allergy to clindamycin.</p><h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3><ul><li>severe kidney disease</li><li>severe liver disease </li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=924&language=English">history of colitis</a>, including colitis caused by antibiotics </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child clindamycin?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when your give your child clindamycin:</p> <ul><li>Give your child clindamycin for as long as your doctor or pharmacist tells you, even if your child seems better. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. </li> <li>Give clindamycin with food or a full glass of water to reduce the chance of an upset stomach. </li> <li>Give clindamycin at the same times every day, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. Pick a time that is easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>If your child is taking liquid clindamycin, shake the bottle well. Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe that the pharmacist gave you. </li> <li>Clindamycin can also be given by an injection (needle) into your child's vein. This injection is usually given at the hospital. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of clindamycin?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does clindamycin take to work?</h2> <p>Your child may begin to feel better within 2 days of starting clindamycin.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of clindamycin?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take clindamycin. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, if they do not go away, or if they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>mild <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a> (watery bowel movements) </li> <li>upset stomach </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> (throwing up) </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>severe stomach cramps or pain </li> <li>severe watery diarrhea </li> <li>diarrhea with blood </li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li></ul> <p>The above side effects may occur up to several weeks after your child stops taking this medicine. Call your doctor immediately if any of these things happen to your child, even if they have stopped taking the medicine. </p><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using clindamycin?</h2><p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal or natural products). </p><p>Before your child has any surgery, including dental surgery or an emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking clindamycin. </p><p>Severe diarrhea may be a sign of a serious side effect. Do not give your child any diarrhea medicine (such as Imodium) without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make the diarrhea worse or make it last longer. </p><p>If your child does not seem better after a few days of taking clindamycin, or if they get worse, check with your doctor.</p><h2>What other important information should you know about clindamycin?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others. Do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough clindamycin to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep clindamycin capsules and liquid at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen. </li><li>Do not keep any medicines that are out of date. Check with your pharmacist about the best way to throw away outdated or leftover medicines.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
ClobazamCClobazamClobazamEnglishPharmacyNANANervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh57.00000000000008.00000000000000450.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called clobazam. This information sheet explains what clobazam does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called clobazam (say: KLOE-ba-zam). This information sheet explains what clobazam does, how to take it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving clobazam to your child<br></h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child is allergic to clobazam or any ingredient in the formulation.</p> <h3>Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. This medicine may not be right for your child if they have:</h3> <ul><li>Kidney disease </li> <li>Liver disease</li> <li>Glaucoma (eye disorder) </li> <li>Respiratory disorders (eg. asthma) </li> <li>Myasthenia gravis (neuromuscular disease) </li> <li>Sleep apnea (pauses in breathing when you sleep) </li></ul><h2>How should I give my child clobazam?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when giving your child clobazam:</p> <ul><li>Give clobazam regularly, exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. Avoid missing doses by giving your child the medicine at the same times each day. </li> <li>The tablets should be swallowed whole. If you need to, you may split or crush the tablet and mix it with water, applesauce, or chocolate pudding for administration. </li> <li>It can be given with or without food. Give it with food if it causes an upset stomach. </li></ul><h2>What should I do if my child misses a dose of clobazam?</h2> <p>If your child misses a dose of the medicine:</p> <ul><li>Give your child the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose, and give your child the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Give your child only one dose at a time. </li></ul><h2>What are the possible side effects of clobazam?</h2> <p>Call your doctor if your child continues to have any of these signs or symptoms:</p> <ul><li>drowsiness or tiredness </li> <li>upset stomach </li> <li>dizziness or light-headedness </li> <li>irritability </li> <li>unsteadiness or clumsiness </li> <li>drooling</li> <li>difficulty sleeping </li> <li>weight gain </li> <li>headache </li> <li>cough</li> <li>constipaton</li></ul> <p>Call your doctor immediately if your child has:</p> <ul><li>confusion </li> <li>muscle weakness </li> <li>changes in behaviour </li> <li>blurred vision </li> <li>uncontrolled movements of the body, including eyes </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using clobazam?</h2> <p>There are some medicines that should not be taken together with clobazam or in some cases the dose of clobazam or the other medicine may need to be adjusted. It is important that you tell your doctor and pharmacist if your child takes any other medications (prescription, over the counter or herbal). Some medicines cause drowsiness and the dose of these medications may have to be adjusted when taken with clobazam. Examples include certain sleeping medicines, pain medicines, and other medications used to treat seizures.</p><h2>What other important information should I know about clobazam?</h2><ul><li>Before your child has any kind of surgery, including dental surgery or emergency treatment, tell the doctor or dentist that your child is taking clobazam. </li><li>Do not stop this medicine without first talking to your child's doctor or pharmacist. Stopping clobazam suddenly may cause symptoms such as nervousness, agitation, and an increase in seizures. </li><li>Keep all medicines out of your child's sight and reach. Store clobazam at room temperature in a dry place. </li><li>Make sure you have enough medicine on hand to last through weekends, holidays, or vacations.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png
ClonazepamCClonazepamClonazepamEnglishPharmacyNANANervous systemDrugs and SupplementsCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-04-15T04:00:00ZAmelia Rodrigues, BScPhm, ACPR, RPh65.00000000000007.00000000000000895.000000000000Drugs (A-Z)Drug A-Z<p class="akh-article-overview">Your child needs to take the medicine called clonazepam. This information sheet explains what clonazepam does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine.</p><p>Your child needs to take the medicine called clonazepam (say: kloe-NA-ze-pam). This information sheet explains what clonazepam does, how to give it, and what side effects or problems your child may have when they take this medicine. </p><h2>Before giving clonazepam to your child</h2> <p>Tell your doctor if your child has an allergy to clonazepam, any ingredient in this medication, or any other benzodiazepines </p> <h3>Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist if your child has any of the following conditions. Precautions may need to be taken with this medicine if your child has: </h3> <ul><li>liver disease </li> <li>kidney disease </li> <li>glaucoma </li> <li>long-term breathing problems </li></ul><h2>How should you give your child clonazepam?</h2> <p>Follow these instructions when you give your child clonazepam:</p> <ul><li>Give clonazepam exactly as your doctor or pharmacist tells you. </li> <li>Talk to your child's doctor before you stop giving this medicine for any reason. Your child may become ill if they stop taking this medicine suddenly. </li> <li>Give clonazepam at the same times every day. Pick times that are easy for you so that you do not miss doses. </li> <li>Give with or without food. Give it with food if it upsets the stomach. </li> <li>If your child is taking liquid clonazepam, shake the bottle well. Measure the dose with the special spoon or syringe the pharmacist gave you. </li> <li>Do not give your child grapefruit or grapefruit juice at any time while your child is taking clonazepam. </li></ul><h2>What should you do if your child misses a dose of clonazepam?</h2> <ul><li>Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. </li> <li>If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Give the next dose at the regular time. </li> <li>Do not give your child two doses to make up for one missed dose. </li></ul><h2>How long does clonazepam take to work?</h2> <p>It may take several weeks to see the full effect of this medicine.</p><h2>What are the possible side effects of clonazepam?</h2> <p>Your child may have some of these side effects while they take clonazepam. Check with your child's doctor if your child continues to have any of these side effects, and they do not go away, or they bother your child: </p> <ul><li>drowsiness </li> <li>dizziness or feeling lightheaded </li> <li>dry mouth </li> <li>slurred speech </li></ul> <p>Call your child's doctor during office hours if your child has any of these side effects:</p> <ul><li>unusual changes in behaviour </li> <li>anxiety </li> <li>rash</li> <li>muscle weakness </li> <li>uncontrolled body movements </li></ul> <h3>Most of the following side effects are not common, but they may be a sign of a serious problem. Call your child's doctor right away or take your child to Emergency if your child has any of these side effects: </h3> <ul><li>worsening or new types of seizures </li> <li>trouble breathing </li> <li>changes in heartbeat </li> <li>severe weakness </li> <li>severe drowsiness </li></ul><h2>What safety measures should you take when your child is using clonazepam?</h2> <p>Keep all appointments at the clinic or doctor's office so that the doctor can check how your child is responding to clonazepam. The doctor may need to change the dose to make sure that your child is getting the right amount. </p> <p>Check with your child's doctor or pharmacist before giving your child any other medicines (prescription, non-prescription, herbal, or natural products). </p> <p>Clonazepam may make your child dizzy, drowsy, and less alert than normal. Watch carefully when your child is doing something that they need to be alert for, such as climbing stairs. School work may be more difficult for your child and you may need to discuss this with their teacher. </p><h2>What other important information should you know about clonazepam?</h2><ul><li>Keep a list of all medications your child is on and show the list to the doctor or pharmacist.</li><li>Do not share your child's medicine with others and do not give anyone else's medicine to your child.</li><li>If your child has a dry mouth, chewing sugarless gum or sucking sugarless candy or pieces of ice may help.</li><li>Make sure you always have enough clonazepam to last through weekends, holidays, and vacations. Call your pharmacy at least 2 days before your child runs out of medicine to order refills. </li><li>Keep clonazepam tablets and liquid at room temperature in a cool, dry place away from sunlight. Do NOT store it in the bathroom or kitchen.<br></li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ICO_DrugA-Z.png

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