AboutKidsHealth

AboutKidsHealth is a health education website for children, youth and their caregivers.

 

 

COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><p>This hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you cope. There are resources on how to support your child's mental health and general wellbeing through physical activity, sleep, nutrition and learning. Also included are videos and audio meditations to help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences that occur throughout your day.<br></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VJ4tKxYISRk"></iframe>  </div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3907&language=English">Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 vaccines</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about the COVID-19 vaccines that are available in Canada and about their safety and effectiveness.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English">COVID-19 vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJ4tKxYISRk">Youth COVID-19 vaccination: What to expect (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Handout.pdf">CARD handout: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/CARD_Vaccination_Poster.pdf">CARD poster: Coping with pain and fear around vaccination for teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines.html">Vaccines for COVID-19: Authorized vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 testing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information that will help you and your child prepare or either a saliva test or a nasopharyngeal swab.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19%20Testing%20How%20to%20prepare%20and%20comfort%20your%20child.pdf">COVID-19 Testing: How to prepare and comfort your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ru-vFZdImes">Saliva testing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3908&language=English">After your child’s COVID-19 test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge (video)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://cmho.org/talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19/">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jwwwF9KQ7CQ">Parenting during COVID-19 and beyond (podcast)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3935&language=English">Keeping your child active during the COVID-19 pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/updated-covid19-school-operation-guidance-document-released/">SickKids - Updated guidance for school operation during the pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3894&language=English">Supporting healthy and responsible screen use during COVID-19</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find helpful resources including handouts, videos and other resources about COVID-19.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqeyRuvF9WU">Your virtual video visit overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3910&language=English">Virtual care: How to accurately measure your child’s height and weight at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jwwwF9KQ7CQ"></iframe> </div><p>See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19COVID-19 learning hub Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.Main
LearningLearningLearningLEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Helpful information for parents to help their child get the most out of school. Learn about academic milestones, bullying and how different types of health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school.</p>​<p>Starting school allows children to build on the skills they have already started developing at home. Find information for parents to help their child get the most out of school, both in and out of the classroom. Learn about academic milestones for children and what you can do to help your child. Find information about how different health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school. Also find resources about bullying and download some tip sheets for parents about bullying in young children.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuXbgK4LObxQVt1sgxcE-L5r" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>For more videos from SickKids experts in collaboration with Youngster, visit <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoKMd2cYwegtZX19uHdNLQA">Youngster on YouTube</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Academic milestones in children</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn about some typical milestones for children and what to look out for if you suspect your child is not meeting these milestones. Remember that not all children learn at the same pace.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Milestones</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=711&language=English">Cognitive development in school-age children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=720&language=English">Phonological processing: Sound awareness, memory, and retrieval</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=651&language=English">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3871&language=English">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=722&language=English">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=732&language=English">Speech and language milestones</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>When to worry</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=725&language=English">Phonological awareness: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=729&language=English">Reading problems: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=724&language=English">Mathematics: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=734&language=English">Speech and language: When to worry</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Boosting your child's academic skills</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Discover what you can do to help your child meet typical milestones. Also find some resources that may help you and your child. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Reading and writing skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=729&language=English">Reading problems: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1903&language=English">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1881&language=English">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=730&language=English">Reading and writing resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=735&language=English">Writing and printing resources</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Math skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=724&language=English">Mathematics: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=721&language=English">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=649&language=English">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=648&language=English">Financial literacy: Teaching kids about money</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=723&language=English">Mathematics resources</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Speech and language skills</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=734&language=English">Speech and language: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=731&language=English">Speech and language problems: How to help your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=733&language=English">Speech and language: Resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=725&language=English">Phonological awareness: When to worry</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=726&language=English">Phonological problems: How to help your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=727&language=English">Phonological problems: Resources</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bullying</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>School or day care is one of the places that bullying may occur. Learn about the different types of bullying, what to look out for and how to help your child. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=303&language=English">Bullying</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=632&language=English">Facial difference: Confronting the challenges of bullying</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=736&language=English">Cyberbullying part one</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=737&language=English">Cyberbullying part two</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=738&language=English">Cyberbullying: Talking to your children</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Helping your child with special needs at school</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Children with health conditions may need special consideration at school. Learn what you need to communicate to your child's school or day care. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Health conditions at school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1489&language=English">Asthma in school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1410&language=English">Brain tumour diagnosis and advocating for your child in school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=650&language=English">Congenital heart defects: Information for teachers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1113&language=English">Eczema: School and activities </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2112&language=English">Epilepsy and learning </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2116&language=English">Epilepsy at school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=652&language=English">Sickle cell disease: A practical guide for teachers</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Learning difficulties at school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=307&language=English">Dyslexia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=653&language=English">Learning disabilities: Overview</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Information for teachers</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>If you are a teacher you may be faced with the extra challenge of having a child with a health condition in your classroom. Here is some information that may help you. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=650&language=English">Congenital heart defects: Information for teachers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=652&language=English">Sickle cell disease: A practical guide for teachers</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/learning_and_education_landing_page.jpglearninglearning,healthylivingLearn about academic milestones, bullying and how different types of health conditions and learning disabilities may affect your child at school. Main
Living with leukemiaLiving with leukemiaLiving with LeukemiaLEnglishOncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2018-03-06T05:00:00Z11.700000000000043.9000000000000284.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p> Learn about challenges you and your child will face during their leukemia treatment.</p><p>Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will face similar emotional obstacles, but their treatment duration and intensity can impact them and their family differently.</p><h2> Key points </h2> <ul><li>Children being treated for leukemia face emotional challenges, but their diagnoses can also affect their siblings, parents and caregivers.</li></ul><p>Taking care of a child with leukemia has a huge impact on everyone in your family: your child who has leukemia, their siblings, you, your partner and other caregivers. It can also affect relationships between family members and with those outside the family. It is important for you and your family to know that there is nothing that you could have done to cause or prevent your child from developing leukemia.</p> <p>Once your child is diagnosed, many different feelings may come up during the course of treatment. All children face similar emotional challenges while being treated for leukemia. However, your child’s leukemia experience may vary depending on whether they have acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This is because of differences in the length and intensity of treatment, and time spent in and out of the hospital. For ALL, your child receives a longer treatment as an outpatient. Children with AML receive a shorter, more intense treatment while in hospital.</p> <p>Whether your child has ALL or AML, eating healthy foods is part of their treatment plan. During this time, your child may face particular eating and nutritional issues, among other new obstacles. Members of your child’s health care team can help you and your child overcome nutritional, emotional, and other challenges you come up against.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Living_with_leukemia.jpg ​Learn about the challenges children being treated for leukemia face and how their diagnoses can also affect their siblings, parents and caregivers. Main
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANACaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn how to support your child’s well-being with activity, sleep and nutrition; and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions.</p><p>This hub includes resources for parents on how to support your child's mental health and general well-being through physical activity, sleep and nutrition. It also provides information on the signs, symptoms and treatments of different mental health conditions, including anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, behavioural disorders, anorexia nervosa and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuURSU5nmvDVZhSR8Ibr7NHK" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>Above is our mental health video playlist. To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Wellbeing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The everyday pressures of growing up can put a strain on any child's mental wellbeing. Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them through difficult times.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3950&language=English">Homesickness</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Screen time</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">Nutrition: How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Anxiety disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Every child feels anxiety at some point as a natural part of growing up. An anxiety disorder, however, is when anxious feelings interfere with a child's everyday routine. Learn more about the signs, symptoms and range of anxiety disorders and how they ​are treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=270&language=English">Types of anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Resources for coping with anxiety</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">The CARD System - Coping with your child's anxiety (for parents/caregivers)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Obsessive compulsive disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs when a person suffers from troubling and intrusive thoughts and/or follows repetitive or strict routines to feel less worried. Learn about the causes, signs and impact of this disorder and how you can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">Obsessive compulsive disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=286&language=English">How OCD affects your child's life</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Depression</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Depression is an illness that causes someone to feel deep sadness or a lack of interest in activities that they once enjoyed. Discover how this condition affects a child's mood, sleep, concentration and energy levels, and how it can be treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=284&language=English">Depression: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=707&language=English">Depression: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=708&language=English">Depression: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bipolar disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When a person has bipolar disorder, they alternate between low and elevated moods for days, weeks or months at a time. Learn about the bipolar disorder spectrum, the symptoms of manic and depressive episodes and how medications, therapy and lifestyle changes can help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=279&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=280&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=704&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=705&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Suicide and self-harm</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A child who experiences thoughts of suicide or self-harm is often suffering from overwhelming emotional pain. Find out how to help your child cope with difficult emotions, how to support and protect your child and where to find professional help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=291&language=English">Suicide in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=289&language=English">Self-harm in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=290&language=English">Signs and symptoms of suicide risk</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=293&language=English">How to help your child with difficult emotions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=292&language=English">How to protect your child from harm</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Eating disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>An eating disorder not only risks your child's health but can also disrupt family life. Find out about the symptoms and treatment of anorexia, bulimia, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and binge eating disorder and how you can help your child recover.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Anorexia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=268&language=English">Anorexia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=269&language=English">Anorexia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=267&language=English">Anorexia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=700&language=English">Anorexia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=266&language=English">Anorexia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Bulimia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=282&language=English">Bulimia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=283&language=English">Bulimia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=281&language=English">Bulimia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=706&language=English">Bulimia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=294&language=English">Bulimia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=274&language=English">Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=275&language=English">ARFID: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=273&language=English">ARFID: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=703&language=English">ARFID: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=272&language=English">ARFID: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Binge eating disorder (BED)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=277&language=English">Binge eating disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=278&language=English">BED: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=640&language=English">Obesity: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=276&language=English">BED: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves difficulties with controlling attention and regulating behaviour. Discover the main symptoms of ADHD in children and teens, how the disorder is diagnosed and how to help your child at home and at school.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1922&language=English">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1923&language=English">ADHD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1997&language=English">ADHD: How to help your child at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1998&language=English">ADHD: Treatment with medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Behavioural disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Behavioural disorders include oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Learn how these disorders differ from typical misbehaviour, how therapy and medications can help and how you can manage problematic behaviour at home.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2001&language=English">Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is triggered by experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event. Learn about the main symptoms of PTSD, how the condition is diagnosed and how psychotherapy and medications can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1927&language=English">Post-traumatic stress disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1928&language=English">PTSD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2005&language=English">PTSD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Brain disorders and mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A brain disorder includes a condition, illness or injury that affects the brain and how it develops before or after birth. Find out how a brain disorder can affect your child's learning, mood and social skills, how its impact on mental health is assessed and how to help your child cope.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1926&language=English">Brain disorders and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2002&language=English">Brain disorders: Assessing your child for neuropsychological difficulties</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2003&language=English">Brain disorders: How to help your child cope</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2004&language=English">Brain disorders: Common treatments</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Parenting a child with a chronic condition</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A chronic conditions can affect a child's mental health and everyday routines. Discover how parents and caregivers can help manage both their child's health care and routines, and support their own mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3400&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3401&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Helping your child manage their health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3402&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Maintaining your child's everyday routines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3403&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Supporting yourself as a caregiver</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Substance use disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Substance use is the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs for pleasure or enjoyment. Learn about the signs and symptoms of substance use and how you can help your teen if you suspect they have a substance use disorder.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3663&language=English">Substance use disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3664&language=English">Substance use disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Understanding functional symptoms and somatization</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Somatization involves expressing distress through physical symptoms. Find out about the mind-body connection, signs of somatization and the various ways to support your child or teen.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3666&language=English">Functional symptoms: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3667&language=English">Mind-body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3668&language=English">Somatization: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3669&language=English">Somatization: Common treatments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3770&language=English">Somatization: How to help your child or teen cope</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Mental_health_landing-page.jpgmentalhealthhealthyliving Learn how to support your child’s wellbeing with activity, sleep and nutrition;, and recognize and manage various mental health conditions. Main
Suicide and self-harmSuicide and self-harmSuicide and self-harmSEnglishAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-09-12T04:00:00Z9.5000000000000058.5000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Thoughts of suicide and self-harm behaviours often result from overwhelming emotional pain. If someone has been going through a very difficult time, self-harm, or even suicide, can sometimes seem like the only way out.</p><p>Self-harm is when someone hurts themselves on purpose. Teens who self-harm may be trying to relieve emotional pain or suffering, or create a physical wound to represent their emotional pain. People who self-harm may sometimes have thoughts of suicide, but not always.</p><p>If you are having thoughts of suicide or self-harm, there are treatments available that can help you figure out why you feel so sad and learn new methods to manage and overcome your pain. Talking openly and honestly with someone you trust can help you feel less alone, lighten your burden and remind you that people care about you and want to help.</p><div class="callout2"><p>If you need help immediately, contact your health-care provider, or call <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">Kids Help Phone</a> at 1-800-668-6868. You can also contact the Crisis Text Line from Kids Help Phone by texting CONNECT to 686868.</p></div><h2>Common signs and symptoms of suicidal thoughts </h2><p>While each person is different, there are some general signs and symptoms of distress. Typically, someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts would experience both behavioural (actions) and emotional (feelings) signs and symptoms of distress. </p><p>Behavioural signs include: </p><ul><li>thinking about or planning self-harm or suicide </li><li>talking about suicide or not wanting to be in the world anymore</li><li>experiencing big changes in sleep habits and appetite</li><li>isolating yourself from friends, family and activities</li><li>engaging in self-harm</li><li>starting or changing substance use</li></ul><p>Emotional signs include:</p><ul><li>feeling worthless, hopeless or trapped</li><li>feeling irritable </li><li>feeling angry or even experiencing rage</li></ul><h2>What causes suicidal thoughts and behaviours?</h2><p>There is no single cause for suicidal thoughts and self-harm behaviours. These thoughts may go away after some time, but they may also come up quickly in response to an event.</p><p>Stressful life events play a big role in the onset of suicidal thoughts. For instance, events such as a difficult break-up, a fight with family or friends, bullying, failing a test or losing a loved one may cause deep feelings of distress and despair and make someone believe that suicide is the only way to escape. </p><p>Other possible causes include mental health conditions such as <a href="/Article?contentid=3810&language=English&hub=mentalhealthAZ#mentalhealth">anxiety</a> and depression. If these are not recognized or treated properly, someone may feel overwhelming sadness and that there is no way out. </p><h2>How are suicidal thoughts and self-harm treated?</h2><p>The first step is talking to someone you trust. This might be a parent, a counsellor, another family member, a counsellor or another adult in your life at home or at school.</p><p>Therapy can also help you sort out what stressful events are happening in your life and causing you to feel sad and hopeless. A therapist can work with you to come up with strategies and skills to handle your feelings and deal with the situations that are causing stress.</p><h2>What can I do to relieve any suicidal thoughts or self-harming behaviour?</h2><p>There are a number of things you can do to support yourself when you are feeling distressed. </p><h3>Talk to someone</h3><p>It can be really difficult to share your deepest thoughts and feelings, but talking with a parent, a teacher or another trusted adult can help.</p><p>Sometimes you might find it easier to share your feelings with a stranger than with someone who knows you well. If you feel distressed and need someone to listen, a crisis help line might be helpful. In Canada, you can call Kids Help Phone on 1-800-668-6868 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also contact the Crisis Text Line from Kids Help Phone by texting CONNECT to 686868, or chat with someone through the online Live Chat or the Always There app. For more information visit <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">kidshelpphone.ca</a>.</p><h3>Distract yourself</h3><p>If you’re feeling especially stressed, do an activity you enjoy, whether it’s watching a movie, listening to music, drawing, reading or writing. Or you could do some vigorous physical activity such as a brisk walk or a run for 10 or 20 minutes. It may also help to eat your favourite food or snack.</p><h3>Use relaxation</h3><p>Use deep breathing or muscle relaxation to help calm yourself. There are many apps available for download, or you can try some of the <a href="/mentalhealth?topic=guidedmeditations">guided meditations</a> on this site. Another option is to take a warm shower and use body wash or other skin products that smell good and might help you to relax. </p><h2>When should I see a doctor?</h2><p>It is very important to see your health-care provider if you:</p><ul><li>are already self-harming</li><li>have suicidal thoughts and cannot see a way out</li></ul><p>Your health-care provider can suggest helpful ways to cope or may refer you to a mental health professional for further help. If they are concerned for your immediate safety, they may send you to your nearest emergency department.</p><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/self_harm_overview.jpg Self-harm is when someone hurts themselves on purpose. Learn how to recognize harmful thoughts and ways to manage and overcome your pain. Teens

 

 

Helping families cope following a traumatic injuryHelping families cope following a traumatic injuryHelping families cope following a traumatic injuryHEnglishOtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2021-01-19T05:00:00Z8.7000000000000063.20000000000001834.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>When a child experiences a traumatic injury it impacts the entire family. Find out how you can manage your own health while caring for your child, their siblings and managing finances and other stress.</p><h2>Emotional coping for parents and caregivers</h2><p>It is normal for parents and caregivers to feel a range of emotions when they are at the hospital. You will likely feel worried and upset after your child is injured. You will meet with many health-care professionals during your first few days in hospital, which can be overwhelming. Many parents also have difficulty sleeping and eating during the first few days their child is in hospital. However, it is important that you take care of yourself so that you can take care of your child. </p><h3>Take care of your physical needs</h3><p>It is important that you find time to care for your physical needs. Make time to sleep, eat, take a break and have a shower. Some hospitals have spaces where you can access a kitchen area, shower or rest, such as a <a href="https://www.rmhccanada.ca/find-an-rmhc-location">Ronald McDonald House Family Room</a>. </p><h3>Take care of your emotional needs</h3><p>Speak with a friend, family member or professional about how you’re feeling. It is better to express your worries than to keep them inside. It is OK to be scared. </p><h3>Guilt </h3><p>Many parents feel guilt following a child’s traumatic injury and wish they could have done something to prevent it. If the parents were not with their child when the injury happened, they wish they had been there. Some parents feel guilty when they see their child in pain. It is important to talk about these feelings and to remember that accidents do happen, even with the most attentive parents. </p><p>Sometimes, parents avoid their emotions by denying the seriousness of their child’s injuries, the recovery time, or that injuries may be permanent. Denial may help you get over the initial shock of the injury and to maintain hope; however, ongoing denial will prevent you from coming to terms with the injuries and adjusting to a potentially new way of daily living.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>It is normal for parents and caregivers to feel different emotions after a child’s traumatic injury, and it is important for you to remember to care for your own physical and emotional needs as well as your child’s needs.</li><li>Trauma reactions can include feeling anxious, being unable to sleep, experiencing flashbacks and triggers, avoiding thoughts of the accident and feeling socially withdrawn.</li><li>Your child’s health-care team can help you manage your child’s emotions and answer any questions they may have.</li><li>Your other children may experience feelings of jealousy and fear or they may act out while your other child is in the hospital. A social worker can help you if necessary.</li><li>Having a child in the hospital can be both an emotional and financial burden.</li></ul><h2>Trauma reactions</h2><p>It is normal for your body to have a trauma reaction when something scary happens to someone you love. Trauma reactions can come in different forms:</p><ul><li>Feeling anxious/jumpy</li><li>Not being able to sleep</li><li>Having flashbacks of the accident</li><li>Experiencing triggers including sights or sounds that remind you of what happened</li><li>Avoiding thinking or feeling about the injury </li><li>Feeling socially withdrawn or dazed</li></ul><p>Usually, these feelings improve over time. If you continue to experience these symptoms for weeks after the injury, it’s important that you speak with a professional about them. </p><p>It is important to remember that each person copes in their own way. They express their feelings in different ways and with different intensity. There is no one 'correct' way to cope.</p><h2>Emotional coping for patients</h2><p>It is normal for your child to experience many different feelings after a traumatic injury, such as anger, helplessness, fear, anxiety, hope, guilt and shock. It is also possible for your child to have a trauma reaction. Children’s reactions appear in all different ways, and it may be difficult to recognize that your child is having a trauma reaction.</p><p>When your child is having a trauma reaction they may experience the following: </p><ul><li>Hyperactivity </li><li>Nightmares, or fear of going to sleep or sleeping alone </li><li>Regressive behaviours (thumb sucking, baby talk, bed-wetting) </li><li>Worry about parent leaving </li><li>Stomach aches and headaches </li><li>Personality changes </li><li>Difficulties in school</li><li>Fear of loss or obsession with death/dying</li></ul><p>Talk to a member of your child’s health-care team that can help your child cope with these feelings. It is especially important to talk with a health-care professional if the symptoms last longer than a few weeks after the injury.</p><h3>Answering your child’s questions </h3><p>It can be hard to know how to answer your child’s questions around their injuries. You may feel intimated by the subject matter and you may not know how much information is appropriate to give them. Here are a few basic tips:</p><ul><li>It’s OK to say, 'I don’t know'. It’s better to tell your child that you don’t know the answer than it is to guess or make something up. Tell your child that you don’t know, but you can find out together. </li><li>It’s OK to speak about the injury in front of your child. This tells them that it’s OK to talk about it and that it’s not a secret. </li><li>Give your child clear concise language around their injury so that they can talk about it in their own words. For example, ‘I got into a car accident and I broke my leg and have a cut on my spleen. My spleen is in my tummy. I need to stay still so that it will heal’. </li><li>If you are not sure what you can say, talk to your child’s health-care team.</li></ul><h2>Siblings</h2><p>Siblings can also experience a range of emotions when their brother or sister gets hurt. </p><h3>Inclusion</h3><p>Your instinct as parents may be to exclude and protect siblings, but for their own healing it is important to include siblings as much as possible. When siblings are excluded, they will often imagine things are worse than they are. If age appropriate, take a picture of your injured child and explain the injuries and medical equipment to siblings before they visit. Try to find other ways for siblings to remain connected throughout hospitalization, such as video or phone calls, writing letters and drawing pictures. You can ask your social worker or child life specialist for help with this. </p><h3>Jealousy</h3><p>Siblings can begin to feel jealous when their brother or sister is receiving so much attention. Try to continue to spend time with your other children. Even if it’s just for a few minutes on the phone, it’s important to let them know that you’re still thinking of them.</p><h3>Fear</h3><p>Siblings may feel scared that they will also experience an injury. It is important to talk to your children about these fears and for them to know that you are there to listen. You can reassure them that you will try your best to keep them safe, but that injuries do happen and that it is nobody’s fault. </p><h3>Acting out</h3><p>Your other children may act out or misbehave throughout the hospitalization or when you are home. This is their way of telling you that they want more attention, or that they have missed you. Reassure them that you still care about them and that there are other ways to get your attention. You may also hear from your child’s teacher that they are displaying different behaviours at school. It may be a good idea to reach out to your school social worker to talk about strategies to help curb the behaviours. </p><h2>Managing family and friends</h2><p>Following your child’s injury there may be many people in your community who want to help and support you. Try to think of ways that these people can be helpful to you right now- whether that’s picking-up your other children from school, doing yard work or making meals. Sometimes the stress of coordinating the help and responding to well-wishers can seem overwhelming. Appoint a spokesperson (friend or family member) to keep these people updated and to coordinate the offers of help. Retelling your story and updating people can be exhausting; you need to keep your energy up to care for your child. </p><h2>Managing media</h2><p>Sometimes, following a high-profile injury, media is alerted of the situation. You may find that somehow media has found out your personal information on social media or from neighbours. If you are contacted by media, please speak to a member of your child’s health-care team. They can connect you to the hospital’s public affairs department , who will be able to protect your privacy and manage media requests so that you can focus on your child. The hospital will not release any information without your consent to protect confidentiality.</p><h2>Managing police</h2><p>In some cases, police may be involved following your child’s injuries. They typically become involved after motor vehicle accidents and acts of violence. It is important that you know your and your child’s rights. Find out if your hospital has a pro-bono lawyer you can speak with or talk to your child’s social worker if you have questions. Write down the jurisdiction (area) of police that is involved, as well as the contact information of the investigating officer. You may also have access to <a href="https://victimservicestoronto.com/">victim services</a>. Victim services is an organization affiliated with the police that provides support to families in crisis. </p><h2>Finances</h2><p>Having a child in the hospital, and then having a child recovering at home can cause a financial strain on families. Speak with your child’s social worker to find out if there are any leaves of absence that you might be eligible for. You can also speak with your employer about any benefits that you may have. If your child was injured in an automobile accident it is critical that you apply for accident benefits, as these benefits can offset many of the costs of being in the hospital.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>Talk to your unit’s Clinical Support Nurse about access to the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/patients-visitors/family-spaces/">RMHC Toronto Family Room at SickKids</a>. </p><p>If you are contacted by media, speak to a member of your health-care team who can reach out to <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/media-relations-policies/">SickKids Public Affairs</a>. Public Affairs is able to protect your privacy and manage media requests so that you can focus on your child. </p><p>Contact the <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/patients-visitors/financial-legal-assistance/">pro-bono lawyer</a> at SickKids or your child’s social worker if you have questions.</p><p>If you are driving to SickKids, you can purchase a multi-day <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/patients-visitors/planning-visit/parking/">parking pass</a> on P1.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="/article?contentid=1266&language=english">Accident benefits</a></p><p><a href="/article?contentid=1927&language=english">Post-traumatic stress disorder</a></p><p><a href="https://www.aftertheinjury.org/tools-parents-help-their-children-and-themselves-recover-injury">After the Injury</a> </p><p><a href="https://www.nctsn.org/resources/all-nctsn-resources">National Child Trauma and Stress Network</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Helping_families_cope_following_a_traumatic_injury.jpgHelping families cope following injury ​Find out how you can manage your own health while caring for your family after your child experiences a traumatic injury. Main
Using gender-inclusive languageUsing gender-inclusive languageUsing gender-inclusive languageUEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-06-21T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000063.4000000000000926.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>No matter how others identify, it is important to respect the words people use to describe themselves. Learn tips about how to be more gender-inclusive and use gender-neutral language.</p><p>No matter how others identify, it is important to respect the words people use to describe themselves. How someone is addressed can make a big difference in making them feel welcome. It may take some extra thinking and practice, but using gender-inclusive language can be helpful to make everyone you meet feel heard and avoid mistakes made when making assumptions.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Gender-inclusive language is language that either respects a person’s preferred terms or does not favour a particular sex.</li><li>Language that respects a person’s preferred terms includes the name and pronouns that they use to describe themselves.</li><li>Language that does not favour a particular sex includes gender-neutral terms like they, them, person, individual, patient, family member, parent, partner, sibling, etc.</li><li>Pronouns are words that are used as a substitute for a person’s name when talking about them in the third person. Pronouns can be gender specific (e.g., she/he) or gender neutral (e.g., they).</li><li>If you make a mistake about a person’s name, terms or pronouns, it can be helpful to apologize, correct yourself, and move on.</li></ul><h2>What is gender-inclusive language?</h2><p>Gender-inclusive language is language that either respects a person’s preferred terms or does not favour a particular sex.</p><p>Language that respects a person’s preferred terms includes the name and pronouns that they use to describe themselves. If you know how someone wishes to be addressed, or if you ask them what terms they prefer, you should use those terms provided. For example:</p><ul><li>Sandra is a good friend of yours who has told you that she prefers to be called <strong>Sandy</strong> and referred to as <strong>she/her</strong>.</li></ul><p>Language that does not favour a particular sex includes gender-neutral terms. If you don’t know how someone wishes to be addressed and are not comfortable asking, you should default to gender-neutral terms. For example:</p><ul><li>You have just met Quinn via email, so you refer to them as <strong>they/them</strong> until you ask for their preferred pronouns or get to know them better.</li></ul><h3>Pronouns</h3><p>When used to describe people, pronouns are words that are used as a substitute for a person’s name. Pronouns are typically used in the third-person point of view, when you are talking about other people or other people are talking about you. For example:</p><ul><li>Kelly used <strong>her</strong> allowance money to buy <strong>herself</strong> some new shoes.</li><li>Tim works at the grocery store. <strong>He</strong> is my favourite cashier!</li><li>Charlie loves to play basketball with <strong>their</strong> friends after school.</li></ul><p>Pronouns can be gender specific (e.g., she/he, her/him, hers/his, herself/himself) or gender neutral (e.g., they, them, their, themselves) when referring to individuals. There are many other gender-neutral pronouns that include (but are not limited to) ze/zir/zirself, xie/hir/hirself, xe/xem/xyr/xemself.</p><h3>Gender-neutral language</h3><p>It is always helpful to use the singular <strong>they</strong> when you are unsure of what pronouns to use to avoid pronoun mistakes. However, there are other gender-neutral terms that can help you with being gender-inclusive. Below is a brief list of titles and terms that are considered gender-neutral:</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Gender-neutral title/term</th><th>Instead of…</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Applicant</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Child</td><td>Daughter/son</td></tr><tr><td>Client</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Employee</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Family member</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Flight attendant</td><td>Stewardess/steward</td></tr><tr><td>Grandchild</td><td>Granddaughter/grandson</td></tr><tr><td>Grandparent</td><td>Grandmother/grandfather</td></tr><tr><td>Group member</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Health-care provider</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Individual</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Mx</td><td>Ms/Mrs/Mr</td></tr><tr><td>Nibling</td><td>Niece/nephew</td></tr><tr><td>Parent or guardian</td><td>Mother/father</td></tr><tr><td>Patient</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Person</td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Police officer</td><td>Policeman</td></tr><tr><td>Postal worker</td><td>Mailman</td></tr><tr><td>Sibling</td><td>Sister/brother</td></tr><tr><td>Significant other</td><td>Girlfriend/boyfriend</td></tr><tr><td>Spouse or partner</td><td>Wife/husband</td></tr><tr><td>Student</td><td></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>What if I make a mistake?</h2><p>Most people try their best to treat others with respect, but sometimes we make mistakes when referring to other people’s names, terms or pronouns. It’s important to remember that mistakes happen to all of us, and it is how we move past the mistakes that really counts. In these situations, it can be helpful to apologize, correct yourself, and move on.</p><h3>Apologize</h3><p>You might recognize your mistake or the person you are talking to might point it out. Regardless of how the mistake is identified, you should acknowledge it and say that you are sorry.</p><p>Example:</p><div class="callout2"><p>Carrie: “I was talking to Carmen today, and she said she wanted to go to the mall after school.”</p><p>Michael: “Carmen identifies as non-binary. They don’t use <strong>she/her</strong> pronouns.”</p><p>Carrie: “Oh! I’m sorry. I didn’t realize.”</p></div><h3>Correct yourself</h3><p>In addition to apologizing, you should also correct your mistake. If you know how you slipped-up, go ahead and proceed with what you meant to say. If you are unsure about how you might have made a mistake, it is okay to politely ask for the correct name, term or pronoun.</p><p>Example:</p><div class="callout2"><p>Carrie: “What pronouns does Carmen prefer?”</p><p>Michael: “They told me that they use <strong>they/them</strong> pronouns.”</p><p>Carrie: “Oh, I see. I was talking to them today, and they said they wanted to go to the mall after school.”</p></div><h3>Move on</h3><p>Once you have corrected yourself, it is helpful not to dwell on your mistake. The person you are talking to might accept your apology, and they also might not. Their forgiveness is not mandatory, but you can always learn from the encounter and use it moving forward to avoid future mistakes.</p><p>Example:</p><div class="callout2"><p>Michael: “That’s okay. I’m sure Carmen would understand. Just be sure to use the correct pronouns going forward.”</p><p>Carrie: “I will. Thanks for letting me know!”<br></p><p></p><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p> <br> <p></p></div><h2>References</h2><p>Guidelines for gender-inclusive language in English. <em>United Nations</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.un.org/en/gender-inclusive-language/guidelines.shtml">https://www.un.org/en/gender-inclusive-language/guidelines.shtml</a>.</p><p>Gender inclusive language: Building relationships with new clients. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/Documents/HealthProf/Gender_Inclusive_Language_General.pdf">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/Documents/HealthProf/Gender_Inclusive_Language_General.pdf</a>.</p><p>Making mistakes and correcting them. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/Documents/HealthProf/Making_Mistakes.pdf">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/Documents/HealthProf/Making_Mistakes.pdf</a>.</p><p>Transgender Identities. <em>Planned Parenthood</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender">https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender</a>.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/portrait%20of%20a%20non-binary%20teen%20at%20home.jpg ​It is important to respect the words people use to describe themselves. Learn about how to be inclusive using gender-neutral language. Teens
Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)FEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-06-19T04:00:00Z9.5000000000000050.40000000000001100.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) describes the effects that result from prenatal alcohol exposure.</p><h2>What is fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)?</h2> <p>Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a general or "umbrella" term used to describe disabilities caused when a woman drinks alcohol during pregnancy. FASD includes any of the following diagnoses: </p> <ul> <li>fetal alcohol syndrome with sentinel features<br></li> <li>fetal alcohol syndrome without sentinel features<br></li> </ul><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause many different problems for the baby, including physical problems and problems with learning, attention, memory and behaviour. </li> <li>Problems caused by drinking during pregnancy are called fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). </li> <li>There is no cure for FASD, but it may be possible to get help for specific problems. It is important to diagnose FASD early. </li> <li>If you are pregnant, do not drink alcohol. </li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of FASD</h2> <p>The effects of FASD are not always obvious at birth. Often, behavioural and learning problems are not noticed until the child is old enough to go to school.<br></p> <p>Some people with FASD have a mixture of specific facial features and developmental problems. Many children with FASD do not have specific facial features.</p> <h3>Problems with development and learning</h3> <p>Children with FASD may have one or more of the following problems:<br></p><ul> <li>slow learning, short attention span, hyperactivity or memory problems </li> <li>learning disabilities, especially with reading, comprehension and abstract math </li> <li>delays or lack of abilities in speech and language, for example, receptive language disorder, interrupting, talking out of context or chatting with no content </li> <li>lack of executive function skills, including difficulties with organization, planning and reasoning </li> <li>inability to manage money, for example by saving and budgeting </li> <li>inability to understand cause and effect </li> </ul> <h3>Sensory integration problems</h3> <p>Children with FASD may have problems with sensory integration. These problems may involve one or more senses, such as: </p> <ul> <li>sensitivity to touch; the child may not be able to tolerate tags in shirts or seams in clothing </li> <li>seeming to need more touch than other children; for example, the child may need tight hugs or may not seem to feel pain </li> <li>hating bright lights or noise </li> <li>noticing smells more than others </li> <li>being bothered by "every little thing" </li> </ul> <p>These problems may occur in combination. A child with FASD could be hypersensitive to bright lights, but crave deep pressure or touch. </p> <h3>Behaviour and mood problems</h3> <p>Babies with FASD may have one or more of the following problems:</p> <ul> <li>irritable, nervous, or sensitive to sound and light </li> <li>cry often </li> <li>very quiet and not very responsive </li> </ul> <p>Children with FASD may have one or more of the following problems:</p> <ul> <li>behavioural problems, such as oppositional defiant disorder and aggressive or defiant behaviours </li> <li>mental illness, such as depression or psychosis </li> <li>drug and alcohol problems </li> <li>anger control problems or violence </li> </ul> <p>Poor judgment and the inability to connect an action with its consequences are the hallmarks of FASD. As a result, people with FASD are at high risk for getting in trouble with the law. </p> <h3>Physical problems</h3> <p>At birth, babies may have one or more of the following:</p> <ul> <li>low birth weight (less than 2.5 kg or 5 lb 8 oz) </li> <li>small head size </li> <li>face and mouth deformities </li> <li>flat shape of the face </li> <li>specific facial features may include thin upper lip, flatness under nose and smaller eyes</li> </ul> <p>Other physical problems may include:</p> <ul> <li>delayed growth </li> <li>small height and/or weight </li> <li>short height as an adult </li> <li>bone, joint, or muscle problems </li> <li>hearing problems </li> <li>repeated ear infections </li> <li>visual and eye problems </li> <li>genital defects </li> <li>heart defects </li> <li>kidney problems </li></ul><h2>FASD is caused by drinking alcohol during pregnancy</h2> <p>FASD can happen when a pregnant woman drinks any type of alcohol, including beer, wine, hard liquor or coolers. Alcohol crosses the placenta from mother to baby. Any amount of alcohol during pregnancy can cause FASD. </p> <ul> <li>High risk is when a woman has two drinks a day, or 14 drinks on average per week, or four or more drinks on any one occasion. </li> <li>Recent evidence suggests that even one drink per day may cause behavioural problems. </li> </ul> <p>The kinds of problems the baby may have depends on when the mother drinks during the pregnancy:</p> <ul> <li>Since the brain is developing during the entire pregnancy, the brain is always being affected if the mother drinks alcohol regularly. </li> <li>Drinking alcohol during the first trimester increases the chance that the baby will have a small brain, physical problems and/or severe intellectual disability. </li> <li>Drinking alcohol during the second trimester increases the chances of spontaneous abortion (miscarriage). </li> <li>Drinking during the third trimester, and during nursing, can affect intelligence. </li> </ul> <p>Not all babies who are exposed to alcohol during pregnancy will have FASD. We do not yet understand why some babies are affected and others are not.<br></p> <h2>FASD is common</h2> <p>FASD affects approximately 1% of people living in Canada. This means that there may be about 300,000 people with FASD living in Canada today. </p><h2>How FASD is diagnosed</h2> <p>Making a diagnosis of FASD requires involvement of a multi-disciplinary team. The assessment may include: </p> <ul> <li>asking about the mother's pregnancy and the child's birth </li> <li>doing a physical exam including assessing facial features<br></li> <li>a developmental assessment: testing the child's abilities to understand, communicate, move and adapt<br></li> </ul><h2>There is no cure for FASD</h2> <p>There is not a specific treatment for FASD. However, it is important to diagnose FASD early to improve outcomes.</p> <ul> <li>Physical and occupational therapy can often help. </li> <li>A child with FASD should have psycho-educational testing to find specific strengths and difficulties. This will help the child get services in school. </li> <li>Social workers can help the family cope and deal with family issues. </li> </ul><h2>Preventing FASD</h2> <p>The only way to prevent FASD is by not drinking alcohol when pregnant.</p> <p>For more information, please see the <a href="/Article?contentid=316&language=English">AboutKidsHealth Pregnancy resource centre</a>. </p> <p>If you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, do not drink alcohol. If you have a problem with drinking, talk to your doctor or another health professional. They may be able to help you stop drinking, or to cut back on your drinking as much as possible. </p><h2>FASD lasts throughout a child's life</h2> <p>The effects of FASD last throughout life. The problems change as the child grows up. Behaviour and mood problems such as alcohol and drug abuse, depression, psychosis and aggressive behaviour may develop in the teenage years. </p> <p>People with FASD may have difficulty managing their own lives or being totally independent as adults. They may need some kind of support their whole lives to be successful. </p><h2>References</h2><p>Cook, J.L., Green, C.R., Lilley, C.M., Anderson, S.M., Baldwin, M.E., Chudley, A.E., . . . Rosales, T. (2016). Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: A guideline for diagnosis across the lifespan. <em>Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), 188</em>(3) 191–197. doi: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.141593">10.1503/cmaj.141593</a></p> https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fetal_alcohol_spectrum_disorder.jpgFetal alcohol spectrum disorder ​Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) can happen if you drink alcohol during pregnancy. Learn more about the problems FASD can cause to babies. Main
Introducing solidsIntroducing solidsIntroducing solidsIEnglishNABaby (1-12 months)BodyDigestive systemNAAdult (19+)NA2021-03-08T05:00:00Z7.8000000000000068.40000000000001571.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out when to start feeding a baby solid food and how to tell when they are ready to start eating solids. Tips for introducing solids are provided.</p><p>Around four to six months of age, you can begin to introduce solid foods into your baby's diet. Start slowly and pay attention to the cues your baby is giving you.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Signs your baby is ready for solid foods include the ability to hold their head up when propped to sit, tongue thrust reflex has disappeared and your baby shows interest in food.</li><li>There are many different ways to introduce solid foods. Foods can vary from culture to culture, and family to family. Start with introducing foods containing iron.</li><li>Continue breastfeeding or bottle feeding according to the same schedule your baby was already on.</li></ul><h2>When to start solid food</h2><p>Many new parents wonder when the right time is to start their baby on solid food. Medical research has shown that your baby’s body is not ready to take in solids until about four to six months of age. It is currently recommended that you exclusively <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=440&language=English">breastfeed</a> or bottle feed your baby until four to six months of age. After that time, you can then give them complementary foods with continued breastfeeding up to two years of age or beyond.</p><p>Before four to six months of age, your baby’s digestive system is not mature enough to handle solids. Your baby’s tongue will push out any foreign substances like food; this is called the tongue reflex, and it protects young babies from choking on foreign objects. Additionally, your baby’s intestines lack important enzymes necessary for digestion, making certain foods difficult for their digestive system to cope with. Starting your baby on solid foods before four to six months of age can also lead to less frequent breastfeeding and a decreased milk supply. If you give your baby solids before they are ready, they will reject the food, and this can set the stage for future mealtime struggles.</p><p>On the flip side, do not wait too long to start solids. Babies over six months of age are more set in their ways. They can be less willing to accept the new flavours and textures of solids, and they may resist learning to chew and swallow solids beyond this age.</p><p>There is no good evidence that delaying solids for longer than six months will protect your baby from developing food allergies, asthma, or eczema. In fact, introducing allergenic solid foods early (around four to six months of age) may prevent the development of <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=809&language=English">peanut</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=806&language=English">egg allergy</a> in infants who are already at a higher risk of developing an allergy.</p><p>For infants who are at a higher risk of developing an allergy, it is recommended that common allergenic foods be introduced at around 6 months of age, but not before 4 months of age. Common allergenic foods include <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=806&language=English">eggs</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=807&language=English">fish</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=808&language=English">milk</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=809&language=English">peanuts</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=810&language=English">seafood</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=811&language=English">sesame seeds</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=805&language=English">soy</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=812&language=English">tree nuts</a>, and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=813&language=English">wheat</a>.</p><p>Here are a few signs that your baby will show when they are ready to start eating solid food:</p><ul><li>They can hold their head up well when propped to sit.</li><ul><li>Puréed foods can be given at this time. Do not offer puréed solids to a baby who cannot hold up their head properly. If your baby cannot sit up at all in a highchair, even when propped up by pillows and blankets, you may want to postpone beginning puréed foods until later.</li><li>When your baby is able to sit up by themselves, usually around seven months of age, you can start offering more chunky foods.</li></ul><li>Their tongue thrust reflex has disappeared.</li><ul><li>Try placing a small bit of rice cereal mixed with formula or breast milk in your baby’s mouth. If your baby’s tongue thrusts the food out (even after several tries), it means that the tongue reflex is still in place, and you should wait a bit longer before introducing solids.</li></ul><li>They are able to move food from the front to the back of their mouth using their tongue. This may take a bit of practice at first.</li><li>They can draw in their lower lip and use this action to take food from a spoon.</li><li>They show interest in food.</li><ul><li>They may grab your fork, take your bread, point at your food, or watch intently whenever you take a bite.</li></ul></ul><h2>Introducing solid food</h2><p>Baby’s first meal is a momentous occasion! But there is more to it than rolling out the highchair and getting the video camera ready. If you want to ensure that the occasion is happy and enjoyable, you will need to consider the timing and setting of that first meal. Early on, feeding solid foods will be messy!</p><h3>Timing is everything</h3><p>Keep in mind that the first few months of solid feedings are really just a time to get your baby used to the taste and texture of food. The actual amount of food your baby eats is not all that important, as long as they continue to take breast or bottle feedings. In fact, the first few feedings will only be a teaspoon or two at most.</p><p>Choose a time when your baby is alert and happy, and not cranky or overtired. Feeding is time-consuming, so make sure you don’t schedule it for a time when you are busy with other chores. If there is one time during the day when your baby is usually hungry, you may want to give their feeding then.</p><h3>Starting out</h3><p>Start by giving your baby a bit of formula or breast milk to whet their appetite, so they are not too hungry to endure the new experience. Don’t give them too much formula or breast milk, though, as that will curb their appetite.</p><p>Offer your baby a quarter of a teaspoon of food. It is best if the food is a smooth, thin purée and the consistency of applesauce. If the food is too lumpy or thick like a paste, your baby may reject it. Use infant cereal to thicken, and breast milk or formula to thin your baby’s food.</p><p>Slip the spoon between their lips and see how they react. Your baby may open their mouth for more, in which case you can place the next bite a bit farther back for easier swallowing. Alternatively, the food might slide right back out. If this happens continually for the first few meals, consider that your baby might not yet be ready for solids. Try again in a week or so. If your baby is ready for solids, they will start to take in more than they spit out.</p><p>Introduce solids once per day for the first few days. Once your baby has mastered this, try introducing another meal and, in another few days, a third daily meal.</p><h3>When to stop the feeding</h3><p>If your baby starts to become fussy, turn their head away, clamp their mouth shut, spit out food, or throw food around, they are giving you signs that they are no longer hungry. Stop feeding them at this point, and don’t force them to continue eating.</p><h2>Foods to start with</h2><p>Around six months of age, try adding the following food to your baby’s dietary repertoire:</p><ul><li>Iron-fortified baby cereal, which comes in rice, barley, or oatmeal varieties. The cereal will come as little flakes and you can mix it with breast milk or formula.</li><li>Puréed meat and chicken</li><li>Mashed, hard-boiled egg</li><li>Well-cooked beans, lentils and chickpeas</li><li>Puréed vegetables such as peas, squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli or green beans. It’s wise to introduce vegetables before your baby has a chance to get used to the sweeter taste of fruit. Babies tend to like yellow veggies such as squash and sweet potato more than the green ones like broccoli or green beans. Vegetables do not need to be fresh; they can be mashed up frozen or canned varieties too. When preparing veggies for your baby, resist the temptation to add salt or butter.</li><li>Fruits (after your baby has accepted vegetables into their diet). Finely mashed or strained banana is a good choice, as is applesauce. Around this time, you can also start to introduce baby cereal mixed with fruit.</li></ul><p>Introduce new foods one by one. Look out for reactions such as diarrhea, vomiting or rash. If your baby does have a problem, this will help you figure out which food might be responsible. If your child is able to tolerate an allergenic food, like peanuts and eggs, try to offer it a few times a week to maintain tolerance.</p><h3>What are some of the first foods my baby can eat?</h3><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kY1SfTZ6VdU" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>For more videos from SickKids experts in collaboration with Youngster, visit <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoKMd2cYwegtZX19uHdNLQA">Youngster on YouTube</a>.</p><h2>Continuing breast or bottle feeding</h2><p>When you start feeding your baby solids, make sure to keep breast or bottle feeding as usual. Continue breastfeeding according to the same schedule that your baby was already on. Over time, as your baby starts eating more solid food, your breast milk supply will gradually decrease. This is nature’s way of weaning your baby.</p><h2>References</h2><p>Simons E, Balshaw R, Lefebvre D, Dai D, Turvey SE, Moraes TJ, Mandhane PJ, Azad MB, Sears MR, Subbarao P, Becker AB (2019). Timing of introduction, sensitization and allergy to highly-allergenic foods at age 3 years in a general-population Canadian cohort. <em>J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract</em>, S2213-2198(19)30903-1.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/introducing_solids.jpg ​Find out when to start feeding a baby solid food, how to tell when they are ready to start eating solids, and tips for introducing solids. Main

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