AboutKidsHealth

AboutKidsHealth is a health education website for children, youth and their caregivers.

 

 

Babies: How can you tell if your baby is ill?Babies: How can you tell if your baby is ill?Babies: How can you tell if your baby is ill?BEnglishNAPremature;Newborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months)BodyNAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)Diarrhea;Fever;Rash;Vomiting2019-01-07T05:00:00Z9.0000000000000059.3000000000000728.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Discover the physical and behavioural signs that your baby may be ill and learn when to take your baby to a doctor.<br></p><p>A change in behaviour is often a sign of illness in babies. If your baby is ill, they may cry more or have a change in activity level. </p><h2>Key points<br></h2> <ul> <li>Fever is usually a sign that your baby’s body is fighting an infection.</li> <li>One of the first signs of illness in babies is a change in behaviour such as being more sleepy or more fussy.​</li> <li>In newborn babies and young infants three months of age or under, fever may be the first and only sign of a serious infection.​ All babies less than three months of age with a fever should see a doctor right away.<br></li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><h3>See your child's doctor right away if you notice any of the following symptoms:</h3><ul><li>a <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> (for babies 3 months old or younger) </li><li>cries inconsolably </li><li>listless or limp </li><li>has convulsions (<a href="/Article?contentid=1773&language=English">seizures</a>)</li><li>fontanelle, the soft spot at the top of their head, is starting to swell </li><li>pain </li><li>purple splotches on their skin, or another type of rash </li><li>pale or flushed </li><li>problems breathing </li><li>refuses to breastfeed or drink from a bottle </li><li>appears to have trouble swallowing </li><li>has not peed in many hours</li><li>has constant vomiting or the vomit has become dark green</li></ul><h2>Fever</h2><p>In newborn babies and young infants three months of age or under, <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a> may be the first and only sign of a serious infection. If you notice a temperature that is even just slightly above the normal range, bring your newborn baby to the doctor as soon as possible. A normal temperature is less than 38°C (100.4°F).</p><h2>Behaviour changes</h2><p>One of the first signs of illness in babies is a change in behaviour. The baby may cry more or have a change in activity level. Generally, if your baby is active when awake, feeding well, and can be comforted when crying, small differences in activity level or crying are normal. However, if your baby becomes very sleepy or fussy, it may be time to see a doctor. Fussiness and decreased energy may be signs that an illness is present.<br></p><h3>Decreased energy</h3><p>Sleepy or listless babies have little or no energy. They sleep longer than normal, and they may be difficult to wake for feedings. When awake, they are drowsy or sluggish; they are not alert and they do not pay attention to visual stimulation or sounds. Decreased energy can develop slowly over time, and parents may have difficulty recognizing it. </p><p>Decreased energy may be a sign of a common infection such as a cold, or a serious type of infection such as influenza or <a href="/Article?contentid=761&language=English">meningitis</a>. Decreased energy can be caused by heart conditions or blood diseases such as thalassemia. There are numerous other conditions that can cause decreased energy, and decreased energy is usually one of many symptoms associated with any particular condition. Therefore, if you notice that your baby is particularly lethargic or listless, bring them to the doctor for an examination. Treatment will depend on the particular condition that is making your baby listless. </p><h3>Fussiness</h3><p>Crying is a baby’s only way of communicating. Over time, babies develop different cries depending on what they need: food, sleep, a diaper change, or a cuddle. Parents gradually learn to decipher their baby’s cries and respond accordingly. Usually parents can console their baby by providing what they need and cuddling them. However, some babies may begin to cry inconsolably. This may be due to a condition called <a href="/Article?contentid=295&language=English">colic​</a>, where babies may cry non-stop for three hours or so each evening. Colic can begin a few weeks after birth and usually tapers off by three to four months of life. </p><p>A baby who becomes very fussy and fretful, with long crying periods, may be ill or in pain. The baby may also become quite jittery or start to tremble. Fussiness may be a sign that your baby has gas, abdominal pain, an earache, or a viral or bacterial infection. The cause of your baby’s fussiness may simply be gas, but it might be something more serious. If your baby is fussy and cannot be consoled, bring them to the doctor for an examination. Treatment will depend on the particular condition that is making your baby fussy.<br></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_can_you_tell_baby_ill.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_can_you_tell_baby_ill.jpgMain
COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><p>This hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you cope. There are resources on how to support your child's mental health and general wellbeing through physical activity, sleep, nutrition and learning. Also included are videos and audio meditations to help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences that occur throughout your day.<br></p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jwwwF9KQ7CQ"></iframe> <br></div> <br><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3907&language=English">Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/9Ay4u7OYOhA">6 steps to prevent COVID-19 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 vaccines</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about the COVID-19 vaccines that are available in Canada and about their safety and effectiveness.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3937&language=English">COVID-19 vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines.html">Vaccines for COVID-19: Authorized vaccines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid-19.ontario.ca/covid-19-vaccines-ontario">COVID-19 vaccines for Ontario</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 testing</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information that will help you and your child prepare or either a saliva test or a nasopharyngeal swab.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/COVID-19%20Testing%20How%20to%20prepare%20and%20comfort%20your%20child.pdf">COVID-19 Testing: How to prepare and comfort your child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ru-vFZdImes">Saliva testing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3908&language=English">After your child’s COVID-19 test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge (video)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cmho.org/blog/blog-news/6519918-talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jwwwF9KQ7CQ">Parenting during COVID-19 and beyond (podcast)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3935&language=English">Keeping your child active during the COVID-19 pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/news/archive/2021/updated-covid19-school-operation-guidance-document-released/">SickKids - Updated guidance for school operation during the pandemic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3894&language=English">Supporting healthy and responsible screen use during COVID-19</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find helpful resources including handouts, videos and other resources about COVID-19.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqeyRuvF9WU">Your virtual video visit overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3910&language=English">Virtual care: How to accurately measure your child’s height and weight at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Audio meditations for mindfulness and coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Listen to these meditations in a quiet, comfortable spot to practise mindfulness, learn about ways to cope with physical and emotional pain or discomfort and to help you with stress throughout your day.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3cevA6EjCbE">5 senses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/O5F3-Xw2XPE">The mountain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jc64ap852FU">Circle of gratitude</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/LMu-r-KZ_l8">Tree meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Coping with physical and emotional pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/UbTyPgHf8z4">Soften, soothe, allow</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/NN7fz8lMTIM">Ice cube</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/e0JMtabUVvQ">Comfort your pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Finding calm/coping with stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RQJNdVtHxlY">Time for rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RpHvQkHYrZ0">Allowing rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/CMcx9tJ70rA">Joy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QSf0JS0O16Q">Key word guided meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Tsi2np8xtVY">Bell meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/263e093H5eM">Bell sounds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Jqu3SOEKtvE">Progressive muscle relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/4ilNITE3-fE">Relaxation with imagery</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <div class="asset-video"> <br> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuU99GGMBBV2N_b2tsRwMx0m"></iframe> <p>Above is our COVID-focused playlist. See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19Main
Early language development in babies and toddlersEarly language development in babies and toddlersEarly language development in babies and toddlersEEnglishDevelopmentalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months)NANANAAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-11-03T05:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the different activities and interventions parents and caregivers can use to help babies and toddlers develop their speech and language. </p><p>While babies and toddlers will develop speech and language skills at different times, there are certain activities and interventions parents and caregivers can use to help their child learn to communicate.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Babies and toddlers will develop speech and language skills at different times.</li><li>There are different interventions parents and caregivers can use to encourage speech and language development such as gestures, using simple language and repetition.</li><li>Parents and caregivers can use different activities to encourage language development, including play time, singing and gesture games.</li></ul><h2>Interventions </h2><p>When interacting with your child, try to incorporate the following suggestions to encourage speech and language development. </p><p> <strong>Face-to-face</strong>: Try to get down to your child’s level so they can see your face and mouth when you talk. </p><p> <strong>Label</strong>: Talk about and label things and actions around you. For example: </p><ul><li>Parent at park: Look, a swing. Slide. Go down the slide. </li></ul><p> <strong>Gesture</strong>: While you say words, try to pair them with a gesture, facial expression, or the actual object. For example, pretend to drink water from a cup while saying, "Drink water."</p><p> <strong>Use simple language</strong>: Use short simple sentences with your child when they are learning to talk. </p><ul><li>Good model: See the kitten. Kitten is furry. </li><li>Not a good model: Can you find the striped, furry kitten in the book? </li></ul><p> <strong>Repeat</strong>: Say new words often in different contexts. For example, say "Get your red coat… I see a red car… let’s eat a red apple."</p><p> <strong>Wait</strong>: Give your child time to respond. Try not to fill in words or say what they want to say - they may need time to understand what you said and to think about what to say.</p><p> <strong>Imitate, interpret and add</strong>: Repeat you child’s utterance with what you think they meant and expand on it. For example:</p><ul><li>Child: Muh </li><li>You: Oh, you want more milk. Yummy milk. </li></ul><h2>Playing at home </h2><p>Teaching language through play can be enjoyable while developing skills. Find activities that are fun for your child and that you can do together, such as baking, sorting laundry, stacking cups or blocks, drumming with pots and spoons, blowing bubbles, filling the sink with water and washing dolls, washing the car, bath time, or making a fort. </p><p>Try the following activities with your child to help bring out language and gestures from them while you play and interact: </p><ul><li>Activate a wind-up toy, let it run out and then hand it to the child. Wait for a request or comment to wind it up again.</li><li>Stack 4 blocks into a tower and then knock it down. Pause and see if the child will ask if you to do it again.</li><li>Blow bubbles and then close the container. Pause and wait for the child to ask for more or for help. </li><li>Blow up a balloon and slowly deflate it. Hand the balloon to the child or hold the deflated balloon to your mouth and pause. </li><li>Place a desired food item in a container with a tight lid. Leave it in front of the child and wait for a request to open the container. </li><li>Sit on the floor facing the child. Roll a ball to the child and practise give and take. After receiving the ball, hold onto it and see if the child requests or comments to continue the activity. </li><li>Put an object that makes a noise (cheerios, toy necklace) into an opaque bag. Shake the bag to make the noise and wait.</li></ul><h3>Learning language through singing and finger plays </h3><p>You can also help your child learn language through singing. Demonstrate or model the song for your child and encourage your child’s attempts to either sing, gesture or both along with you. </p><ul><li>Fill in the blank ("Old MacDonald had a farm _____"). </li><li>Praise your child for any attempts to sing or gesture on their own.</li><li>Clap along.</li></ul><p>Examples of gesture games and finger plays include:</p><ul><li>Peek-a-boo </li><li>This Little Piggy</li><li>Head and Shoulders, Knees and Toes </li><li>If You’re Happy and You Know it</li><li>Pat-a-Cake </li><li>Eensie Weensie Spider</li><li>Round and Round the Garden </li></ul> Examples of songs and nursery rhymes you can sing to your child include: <ul><li>Old MacDonald Had a Farm</li><li>Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star </li><li>If You're Happy and you Know It </li><li>I'm a Little Teapot </li><li>Hickory, Dickory Dock </li><li>Humpty Dumpty </li><li>Skinamarink </li><li>Head Shoulders Knees and Toes </li><li>Five Little Monkeys</li><li>One, Two Buckle My Shoe</li><li>This Old Man</li><li>Pat-a-Cake, Pat-a-Cake</li><li>Baby Bumblebee</li><li>The Wheels on the Bus </li><li>B-i-n-g-o</li><li>Do, a Deer </li><li>Baby Shark </li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Early_language_development_in_babies_and_toddlers.jpgEarly language development Learn about the different activities and interventions caregivers can use to help babies and toddlers develop their speech and language.Main
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANACaregivers Adult (19+)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn how to support your child’s well-being with activity, sleep and nutrition; and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions.</p><p>This hub includes resources for parents on how to support your child's mental health and general well-being through physical activity, sleep and nutrition. It also provides information on the signs, symptoms and treatments of different mental health conditions, including anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, behavioural disorders, anorexia nervosa and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.<br></p><br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuURSU5nmvDVZhSR8Ibr7NHK" frameborder="0"></iframe><br></div><p>Above is our mental health video playlist. To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The everyday pressures of growing up can put a strain on any child's mental well-being. Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them through difficult times.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and well-being</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Screen time</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=639&language=English">Nutrition: How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Anxiety disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Every child feels anxiety at some point as a natural part of growing up. An anxiety disorder, however, is when anxious feelings interfere with a child's everyday routine. Learn more about the signs, symptoms and range of anxiety disorders and how they ​are treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=271&language=English">Anxiety: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=270&language=English">Types of anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=701&language=English">Anxiety: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=702&language=English">Anxiety: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Resources for coping with anxiety</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">The CARD System - Coping with your child's anxiety (for parents/caregivers)</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Obsessive compulsive disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) occurs when a person suffers from troubling and intrusive thoughts and/or follows repetitive or strict routines to feel less worried. Learn about the causes, signs and impact of this disorder and how you can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=285&language=English">Obsessive compulsive disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=288&language=English">OCD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=286&language=English">How OCD affects your child's life</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=709&language=English">OCD: Psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=287&language=English">OCD: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Depression</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Depression is an illness that causes someone to feel deep sadness or a lack of interest in activities that they once enjoyed. Discover how this condition affects a child's mood, sleep, concentration and energy levels, and how it can be treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=284&language=English">Depression: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=707&language=English">Depression: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=708&language=English">Depression: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Bipolar disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When a person has bipolar disorder, they alternate between low and elevated moods for days, weeks or months at a time. Learn about the bipolar disorder spectrum, the symptoms of manic and depressive episodes and how medications, therapy and lifestyle changes can help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=279&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=280&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=704&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Treatment with medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=705&language=English">Bipolar disorder: Psychotherapy and lifestyle changes</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Suicide and self-harm</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A child who experiences thoughts of suicide or self-harm is often suffering from overwhelming emotional pain. Find out how to help your child cope with difficult emotions, how to support and protect your child and where to find professional help.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=291&language=English">Suicide in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=289&language=English">Self-harm in children and teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=290&language=English">Signs and symptoms of suicide risk</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=293&language=English">How to help your child with difficult emotions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=292&language=English">How to protect your child from harm</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Eating disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>An eating disorder not only risks your child's health but can also disrupt family life. Find out about the symptoms and treatment of anorexia, bulimia, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and binge eating disorder and how you can help your child recover.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Anorexia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=268&language=English">Anorexia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=269&language=English">Anorexia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=267&language=English">Anorexia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=700&language=English">Anorexia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=266&language=English">Anorexia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Bulimia nervosa</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=282&language=English">Bulimia nervosa: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=283&language=English">Bulimia: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=281&language=English">Bulimia: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=706&language=English">Bulimia: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=294&language=English">Bulimia: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=274&language=English">Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=275&language=English">ARFID: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=273&language=English">ARFID: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=703&language=English">ARFID: Treatment options</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=272&language=English">ARFID: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Binge eating disorder (BED)</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=277&language=English">Binge eating disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=278&language=English">BED: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=640&language=English">Obesity: Medical complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=276&language=English">BED: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves difficulties with controlling attention and regulating behaviour. Discover the main symptoms of ADHD in children and teens, how the disorder is diagnosed and how to help your child at home and at school.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1922&language=English">Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1923&language=English">ADHD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1997&language=English">ADHD: How to help your child at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1999&language=English">ADHD: Communicating with your child's school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1998&language=English">ADHD: Treatment with medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Behavioural disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Behavioural disorders include oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder. Learn how these disorders differ from typical misbehaviour, how therapy and medications can help and how you can manage problematic behaviour at home.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1924&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1925&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2000&language=English">Behavioural disorders: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2001&language=English">Behavioural disorders: How to help your child at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is triggered by experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event. Learn about the main symptoms of PTSD, how the condition is diagnosed and how psychotherapy and medications can help your child.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1927&language=English">Post-traumatic stress disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1928&language=English">PTSD: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2005&language=English">PTSD: Treatment with psychotherapy and medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Brain disorders and mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A brain disorder includes a condition, illness or injury that affects the brain and how it develops before or after birth. Find out how a brain disorder can affect your child's learning, mood and social skills, how its impact on mental health is assessed and how to help your child cope.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1926&language=English">Brain disorders and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2002&language=English">Brain disorders: Assessing your child for neuropsychological difficulties</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2003&language=English">Brain disorders: How to help your child cope</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2004&language=English">Brain disorders: Common treatments</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Parenting a child with a chronic condition</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>A chronic conditions can affect a child's mental health and everyday routines. Discover how parents and caregivers can help manage both their child's health care and routines, and support their own mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3400&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3401&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Helping your child manage their health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3402&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Maintaining your child's everyday routines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3403&language=English">Living with a chronic condition: Supporting yourself as a caregiver</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Substance use disorder</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Substance use is the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs for pleasure or enjoyment. Learn about the signs and symptoms of substance use and how you can help your teen if you suspect they have a substance use disorder.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3663&language=English">Substance use disorder: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3664&language=English">Substance use disorder: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3665&language=English">Substance use disorder: How to help your teen at home</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Understanding functional symptoms and somatization</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Somatization involves expressing distress through physical symptoms. Find out about the mind-body connection, signs of somatization and the various ways to support your child or teen.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3666&language=English">Functional symptoms: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3667&language=English">Mind-body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3668&language=English">Somatization: Signs and symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3669&language=English">Somatization: Common treatments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3770&language=English">Somatization: How to help your child or teen cope</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Mental_health_landing-page.jpgmentalhealthhealthyliving Learn how to support your child’s wellbeing with activity, sleep and nutrition, and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions. Main
Safe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Set up and clean upSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Set up and clean upSafe handling of hazardous medicines at home: Set up and clean upSEnglishPharmacyBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANADrug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg2020-10-22T04:00:00Z7.9000000000000063.4000000000000885.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A guide on how to safely give and handle your child's hazardous medicines at home.</p><h2>What is hazardous medicine?</h2><p>Hazardous medicines are used to treat a variety of medical conditions. For example, chemotherapy is used to treat cancer, and immunosuppressants are used to prevent organ rejection after a transplant.</p><p>Hazardous medicine can damage healthy cells. Anyone handling hazardous medicine should keep themselves protected.</p><p>Although the risk of harm from handling hazardous medicine is small, it is a good idea to avoid exposure. This includes not tasting your child’s medicine. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid contact with hazardous medicine. If possible, have someone else give your child their tablet or capsule.<br></p><p></p><div class="asset-video"><p></p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VBnzZrA6xQ8">frameborder=&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;0&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;</iframe>  <br> <p></p>For more videos on how to safely handle hazardous medicines, please view the <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuWBtC0ID5BCbZCMVHJvTcdr">Safe Handling</a> playlist.<br></div><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A gown, mask and gloves offer protection when handling hazardous medicine.</li><li>Hazardous medicine comes in several different forms, including tablets and capsules.</li></ul><h2>Giving your child the medicine</h2><p>Always prepare the medicine right before your child will take it. Never prepare and store the dose ahead of time.</p><p>Before preparing your child's medicine:</p> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_wash_hands_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="handwashing at sink" /> </figure> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/chemo_at_home_general_protect_yourself_EQUIP_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="person wearing a mask, gown and gloves" /> </figure> <ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Put on your gloves, gown and mask.</li><li>Place paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat over your work surface.</li></ul><p>You are now ready to handle your child’s medicine.</p><h2>Clean-up and storage of hazardous medicines</h2><p>Hazardous medicines should be handled safely. It is important to carefully handle the clean-up of the supplies and work area, and to dispose of wastes properly.</p><p>All disposable items that have been in contact with hazardous medicines, such as the used paper towels and gloves, must go into a designated plastic waste bag or container. Contact the Household Hazardous Waste Depot in your neighbourhood to see if they will accept the waste bags or containers. If such a service does not exist in your area, ask a member of your child's health-care team about other options.</p><p>You may wash and reuse some of your supplies, but do not rinse them in the kitchen sink over other dishes or utensils. If you are reusing an item, such as the medicine cup, rinse it with warm soapy water and allow it to air dry. Clean the sink after washing your supplies.</p><p>Always store hazardous medicines away from children and pets. If stored at room temperature, place them in a locked box, away from moisture and direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry place. If the medicine needs refrigeration, place it in a separate container at the back of the fridge. Return the medicine to the locked box or fridge after each use. Do not keep any medicine in your purse, knapsack or diaper bag.</p><h3>Take special precautions with your child's waste (vomit, urine and stool) while they are taking hazardous medicine</h3><p>While your child is taking hazardous medicine, some of the drug is broken down and removed from the body through urine and stool. It may also appear in vomit. It is important that you protect yourself and others from hazardous medicine in your child's urine, stool or vomit by following these guidelines:</p><ul><li>When changing your child’s diaper, wear disposable gloves and place diapers in a sealed plastic bag before disposal.</li><li>If your child is toilet trained, have your child close the lid, to avoid splashes, and flush twice after using the toilet. Always make sure they wash their hands afterwards.</li><li>Have supplies ready in case you need to quickly clean up any accident. You need a paper towel, soap and water, disposable gloves, and a disposable container, such as an empty ice cream container.</li><li>Use a plastic mattress cover to protect the mattress from accidents.</li><li>Keep a plastic container close by in case of vomiting. If you use the container, empty the contents into the toilet and wash with warm soapy water.</li><li>Wear disposable gloves when you are handling any bodily wastes, for example, when changing soiled sheets or cleaning up vomit.</li><li>Wash soiled clothes or sheets separately from other laundry. If they cannot be washed right away, place them in a sealed plastic bag and set it aside.</li><li>Once you are all finished, wash your hands.</li></ul><p>Remember these key tips for safe handling of hazardous medicines at home.</p><ul><li>If possible, avoid contact with hazardous medicines if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.</li><li>You and your child should wash your hands before and after handling hazardous medicines.</li><li>Wear gloves when handling hazardous medicine tablets, capsules or liquids.</li><li>Properly clean, dispose or store the equipment and hazardous medicine.</li></ul><h2>Preparing the space</h2><p>You will need to gather certain supplies and take careful steps when setting up your work area. Your child’s health-care provider will help you make a list of the supplies you will need. You can buy these materials at a grocery or drug store.</p><p>To handle your child’s hazardous medicine at home, choose an uncluttered counter or table away from windows, fans, vents, areas where you prepare food, and where children and pets play.</p><p>Depending on how you prepare your child’s medicine you may need to wear a gown, mask and gloves as they offer protection. Other supplies may include:</p><ul><li>paper towels or a disposable, absorbent plastic-backed mat — to contain any spills</li><li>a plastic bag — for waste disposal</li><li>a syringe, medicine cup, tweezers, pill splitter or other items that you need to prepare your child’s medicine dose</li><li>your child’s medicine</li></ul>Handling hazardous medicines at home Learn how to safely give and handle your child's hazardous medicines at home, including preparing the work area and cleaning up supplies.Main

 

 

Acne (acne vulgaris)Acne (acne vulgaris)Acne (acne vulgaris)AEnglishDermatologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)SkinSkinConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-01-14T05:00:00Z8.2000000000000058.50000000000001522.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Acne is the most common skin condition in teens. Discover the different types and causes and how they can be treated.<br></p><p>Acne, clinically known as acne vulgaris, is the most common skin disease. It affects 85% of teenagers, some as young as 12, and often continues into adulthood. It is also called "pimples," "zits" or "blemishes".</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease in teenagers.</li><li>Acne occurs deep within the skin, and severity and outcomes vary from person to person.</li><li>Acne causes comedones (whiteheads and blackheads), papules, pustules or even nodules.</li><li>Picking, squeezing and popping can lead to scarring.</li><li>Acne is manageable with the appropriate treatment. Ask your doctor or your dermatologist about your options.<br></li></ul><h2>What causes acne?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Anatomy of the skin</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_skin_anatomy_EN.jpg" alt="Identification of a hair, sebaceous gland, sweat gland and blood vessels in the skin" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Acne occurs when the sebaceous glands produce more oil, clogging different parts of skin tissue.</figcaption> </figure> <p>The skin is formed by many layers of tissue, containing hair, glands, muscles, sensory receptors and blood vessels. During puberty, a group of hormones are released called androgens. Androgens allow the sebaceous glands in the skin to produce an oily substance called sebum. Acne is in part caused by this increase in sebum that naturally occurs during puberty.<br></p><p>Normal amounts of sebum keep skin and hair from drying out. However, excess oil can mix with dead skin cells and clog hair follicles (the tiny tunnels that lead to the root of the hair) and pores (the opening in the skin where the hair passes through).</p><p>A common type of bacteria that lives on the skin, known as <em>Propionibacterium acnes</em>, sometimes contributes to acne by causing inflammation. The acne signals white blood cells to the area, which damage the tissue and cause an inflammatory response. This causes swelling and infection.</p><p>Acne leads to persistent redness and inflammation, especially on the face, scalp, back and chest, where the most sebum is produced.</p><p>Acne varies from mild to severe, depending on what kind of blemishes appear. The different types of acne include:<br></p><ul><li>comedones</li><li>papules</li><li>pustules</li><li>nodules</li></ul><p>Comedones are pores that are blocked with oil and dead skin cells. They can be open ("blackheads") or closed by the skin ("whiteheads").</p><p>A blackhead is generally level with the skin surface and cannot be removed by normal washing of the face.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Open comedo (blackhead)</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_acne_blackhead_EN.png" alt="Cross section of skin with an oxidized sebum, which appears black at the top, and a surface view of skin with blackheads" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The pore of a blackhead is open. When the sebum comes into contact with the air, oxygen exposure causes it to appear black.</figcaption></figure> <p>A whitehead is slightly raised from the skin, but there is no inflammation.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Closed comedo (whitehead)</span><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_acne_whitehead_EN.png" alt="Cross section of skin with a trapped sebum and clogged pore, and a surface view of skin with whiteheads" /><figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A whitehead is formed when pores are blocked with sebum and dead skin cells. The pore in a whitehead is not open at the top.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Papules are red, small, hard bumps that are slightly raised on the skin. In clusters, they can feel like sandpaper to the touch. White blood cells enter the follicle, causing inflammation.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Papule</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_acne_papule_EN.png" alt="Cross section of skin with inflammation and white blood cells around sebum, and surface view of skin with papules" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Papules are red, painful bumps caused by inflammation of the hair follicles.</figcaption></figure> <p>When the white blood cells in a papule make it to the surface of the skin, a pustule is formed. Pustules appear as red, inflamed circles with a central, raised bump that is yellowish or white. The bump is filled with pus. Pus is the result of inflammation and contains white blood cells, dead skin cells and bacteria.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Pustule</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_acne_pustule_EN.png" alt="Cross section of pus under the skin and white blood cells that have moved toward the surface, and surface view of pustules" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Pustules form a few days after the white blood cells in a papule make it to the surface of the skin. Pustules are typically called "pimples" or "zits".</figcaption></figure> <p>When a papule or pustule expands, it can cause more severe inflammation in the surrounding skin. This can lead to nodules, which are deep, red, round bumps that can have a diameter of 6 to 20 mm. They are sometimes referred to as cysts.</p><p>Nodules are formed by irritated, inflamed hair follicles that have ruptured deep under the skin. They can be throbbing and painful, even without touching.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Nodule</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_acne_nodule_EN.png" alt="Cross section of pus and inflammation under the skin with large swollen bump on skin surface, and surface view of nodule" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Nodules are often large, inflamed, red, swollen and painful to the touch.</figcaption></figure><h2>Psychological impact of acne</h2> <p>Acne can have a profound impact on a person's quality of life, particularly for teenagers. Reactions can range from minimal distress to more significant depression, anxiety and, less commonly, thoughts of suicide or self-harm. For these reasons, treating acne matters.</p> <h2>Treatment of acne</h2> <p>Treatment depends on the severity and type of acne. An effective treatment will help reduce future breakouts and improve the skin's appearance. Keep in mind that up to six weeks of treatment might be necessary to start noticing results.</p> <p>In most cases, your doctor or dermatologist will prescribe topical treatments (applied directly on the skin). Sometimes the doctor may prescribe an oral treatment (taken by mouth).</p> <h3>Cleansing skin</h3> <p>Acne is a process deep within the skin. Washing your face regularly helps remove dead skin cells and excess oil, but does not play a significant role in the prevention or management of acne.</p> <p>If you have acne, avoid scrubbing your face when washing, because this may worsen inflammation and irritation. Instead, gently wash your face with warm water. You may also use a mild cleansing product if you want.</p> <h3>Topical retinoids</h3> <p>Topical retinoids unplug comedones and improve the process of shedding the old cells. They may also help reduce any inflammation.</p> <p>Some side effects may occur when using a topical retinoid. These include mild irritation, redness (erythema), dryness, peeling and sensitivity to sun. If you are pregnant, or thinking about having a baby, talk to your doctor or dermatologist before using a topical retinoid, as they should not be used during pregnancy.</p> <p>Avoid skin damage, such as waxing or exfoliation (e.g., facials) when taking retinoids.</p> <p>Common topical retinoids are available in cream and gel form. There are benefits to both creams and gels, depending on the severity of acne and the sensitivity of your skin. Retinoids are also available in many strengths and formulations. Therefore, there is no one better option; your doctor will recommend a retinoid most appropriate for you.</p> <h3>Topical antimicrobials</h3> <p>Topical antimicrobials are used to kill bacteria that contribute to inflammation. They also help fight inflammation directly. One option is benzoyl peroxide, which is available over the counter. When benzoyl peroxide touches the skin, oxygen is created. <em>P. acnes</em> cannot survive in the presence of oxygen.</p> <p>Use caution when applying benzoyl peroxide because it is a potent bleaching agent that can damage fabrics. The pharmacist can answer any questions you might have.</p> <h3>Oral antibiotics</h3> <p>An oral antibiotic (taken by mouth) is sometimes used to treat more significant acne, especially in cases where the acne has spread to the back and chest. Such as topical treatments, oral antibiotics reduce inflammation.</p> <p>Antibiotics can also stop <em>P. acnes</em> from multiplying. However, the use of antibiotics should be limited because bacteria can develop a resistance to them.</p> <h3>Combined treatment</h3> <p>A combined treatment can be an effective means of treating acne. In this case, a topical retinoid and an antimicrobial cream or gel can be used together. Sometimes they are combined into one product, while other times they are used separately. For example, a topical antimicrobial may be applied in the morning and a topical retinoid may be used at night.</p> <p>Oral medications are also used in combination with a topical treatment. Most people taking a pill benefit from a topical cream or gel.</p> <p>Your doctor or dermatologist will advise you on how and when to use a combined treatment for acne.</p> <h3>Oral isotretinoin</h3> <p>Isotretinoin (known as Accutane in North America; Clarus and Epuris in Canada; and Roaccutane in Europe) is a chemical compound related to vitamin A. In most cases, isotretinoin is used to treat severe nodular and scarring acne because:</p> <ul> <li>it reduces sebum secretion</li> <li>it prevents the formation of comedones</li> <li>it acts as an anti-inflammatory</li> <li>it stops <em>P. acnes</em> from generating in hair follicles and sebaceous glands</li> </ul> <p>However, this type of acne treatment must be closely monitored because isotretinoin has a number of side effects. More common side effects include dry skin, lips, nose and eyes. All side effects will begin to disappear when treatment stops.</p> <p>However, there are more severe side effects. For example, isotretinoin can interfere with the development of a fetus. If you are pregnant or thinking about having a baby, talk to your doctor or dermatologist about the side effects of isotretinoin. There are also concerns about depression, inflammatory bowel disease and impact on liver.</p> <h3>Hormonal therapy</h3> <p>Treating acne with female hormones is an effective treatment option for some female patients. This means taking an oral contraceptive (the birth control pill). This type of treatment limits sebum secretion by reducing androgen levels. Other topical and oral treatments can be used along with oral hormonal therapy.</p> <p>Treating acne using hormones is not for everybody. For more information, talk to your doctor or dermatologist.</p><h2>Scar prevention</h2> <p>If left untreated, some acne can cause scarring. It is not always easy to predict which acne will cause scarring; it is a complex problem.</p> <p>Handle acne with care. Manipulating, squeezing and popping increases the likelihood of scarring. The best way to prevent scarring is to actively treat the acne. Treatment is not only for those who have severe acne; no matter how little or how much acne you might have, you can seek treatment for your skin.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/acne_vulgaris.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/acne_vulgaris.jpgMain
Fracture: How to treat a buckle fracture of the distal radiusFracture: How to treat a buckle fracture of the distal radiusFracture: How to treat a buckle fracture of the distal radiusFEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Lower armBonesNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PST_splint_wrist_EN.jpg2017-02-16T05:00:00Z6.9000000000000074.00000000000001067.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>A buckle fracture occurs when a bone slightly crushes in on itself. Learn how this common childhood fracture is treated with a splint.</p><div class="akh-series"><div class="row"><div class="col-md-12"> <figure><span class="asset-image-title">Buckle fracture of the distal radius</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_fracture_buckle_EN.jpg" alt="Illustration of arm with buckle fracture in the radius" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The most common buckle fracture in children occurs in the distal radius. Sometimes a child will also have a minor fracture of the ulna.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What is a buckle fracture?</h2><p>A buckle fracture occurs when a bone “buckles”, or slightly crushes in on itself. The most common type of buckle fracture in children occurs in the forearm, near the wrist, usually after a child falls onto an outstretched arm. The injury affects the radius bone in particular.</p></div></div></div><h2>Where is the radius?</h2> <p>The radius runs from the elbow to the hand. It makes up the forearm along with the ulna, the bone that runs alongside it. The ‘distal’ part of the radius is the part furthest away from the centre of the body, in other words, nearest the wrist.</p> <p>Buckle fractures occur only in children and are very common. Children’s <a href="/Article?contentid=1938&language=English">bones</a> are softer than adult bones and able to bend and compress without fully breaking. Although the bone does not fully break, the fracture can still cause pain.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>A buckle fracture of the distal radius is a partial break of the bone and is the most common fracture in children.</li> <li>Almost all children recover very well within four weeks with the aid of a removable splint for pain control and protection.</li> <li>Your child should avoid all physical activity that could re-injure the wrist for at least three weeks after the splint is removed (typically six to eight weeks from date of injury).<br></li></ul><h2>When should my child wear their splint?</h2> <p>Your child should wear their splint during the day but may remove it at bath time. For the first week, most children also wear the splint at night for comfort, but you can remove it at bedtime once it is no longer needed for pain control.</p> <h2>How do I remove the splint?</h2> <p>When removing the splint:</p> <ul> <li>take your time and pay full attention</li> <li>make sure that your child is calm</li> <li>allow your child to gently and slowly move their wrist</li> </ul> <h2>Can my child go back to school or playgroup with the splint on?</h2> <p>Your child may return to school or playgroup while wearing the splint the day after they hurt their wrist. Make sure staff know that the arm is injured so they can take appropriate care.</p> <h2>When will my child be able to move their wrist and hand normally again?</h2> <p>Most children start to use their wrist and hand again while still wearing their splint. Your child may use their injured arm as it heals but should rest it if they feel pain.</p> <h2>When can my child stop wearing the splint?</h2> <p>Depending on your child’s healing, they can usually stop wearing the splint after two or three weeks. A few children need to wear the splint for up to four to six weeks for comfort.</p> <p>You should only remove the splint completely when your child’s wrist is no longer in pain. If their wrist is still painful, replace the splint for another week. Repeat this step until the pain disappears.</p> <h2>What should I do if my child keeps removing the splint?</h2> <p>For the first one to two weeks after injury, try securing the straps of the splint with sticky tape.</p> <p>If your child tries to remove the splint after the second week and appears to be pain-free and willing to use their arm and hand normally, leave the splint off and monitor them. At this stage, the buckle fracture has probably healed and is safe from re-injury except during contact sports.</p><h2>What should I expect when the splint comes off?</h2><p>Your child’s arm may be slightly stiff from being in a splint and your child may be a little unsure with their movements to start with. This should pass as the child uses their arm or wrist more.</p><h2>Once the splint is off, can my child return to all physical activities?</h2><p>For the first six weeks after their injury, or for about the first three weeks after the splint is removed, your child should avoid physical education, sports, climbing or other activities, such as swinging or using slides, where a fall could re-injure their wrist.</p><h2>When should my child see a doctor about their injury? </h2><p>It is not usually essential for a child to see a doctor about their injury after they leave the hospital. Most children with this wrist injury heal very well and return to their usual activities within four weeks.</p><p>If your child needs a follow-up visit to your family doctor or paediatrician, the doctor in the hospital emergency department will let you know.</p> <h2>What should I do with the splint once it is removed?</h2><p>It is best to keep the splint safe for a few days until you are sure your child no longer needs it.</p><h2>How are distal radius buckle fractures treated?</h2> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Splint</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PST_splint_wrist_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>When your child goes to the hospital with an injured arm, they will be examined carefully. Often, the doctor will order an X-ray to check if there is an injury.</p><p>If there is a buckle fracture of the distal radius, the doctor will recommend a splint to treat it.</p><p>A buckle fracture is best treated with a splint rather than a full circular plaster cast. Because the bones are only partially broken, they heal very well within a few weeks with the support and protection that a splint provides. A splint also makes normal daily activities, such as bathing, easier and can often save extra visits to the doctor.</p><p>Once it is treated properly, a buckle fracture does not cause any long-term problems with the movement or appearance of your child’s arm or wrist.</p><h2>What should I expect in the first few days after my child’s injury?</h2> <p>Your child may have some pain in their wrist. If your child is in pain at home, give them <a href="/article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a> or <a href="/article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> according to your doctor’s instructions.</p> <p>Your child’s wrist might also be slightly swollen due to the injured tissues and bones. This usually settles within the first one or two weeks. You can help ease swelling by elevating (raising) your child’s injured arm above their chest for the first two or three days. To do this, have your child lie down and place their injured arm on a large cushion or pillow.</p>Buckle fracture of the distal radius Main
Scald preventionScald preventionScald preventionSEnglishPreventionChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2020-11-25T05:00:00Z5.3000000000000075.0000000000000292.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Hot liquids cause approximately 70% of burns in children. Learn how to keep your children safe from scalds and how to treat a burn.</p><p>Hot liquids are the major cause of burn injuries in young children. Burns that are caused by contact with a hot liquid are called scalds. They are preventable. A burn from hot water can lead to deep burns requiring surgery and to permanent scars.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Hot liquids are the major cause of burn injuries in young children. Burns that are caused by contact with a hot liquid are called scalds.</li> <li>Scalds are preventable. Do not leave children alone around hot beverages or food preparation areas, including the stove. Turn handles of pots on the stove inwards.</li> <li>If your child has a scald injury, remove any clothes that are covering the injury. Then, use water that is either room temperature or a bit cooler than room temperature to cool the burn over a period of 20 minutes.</li> </ul><h2>Scald prevention</h2><ul><li>Keep young children away from food preparation areas.</li><li>Do not let children play in the kitchen.</li><li>When possible, use the back burners of the stove and keep pot handles turned in.</li><li>Use stovetop element guards.</li><li>Never hold a child when drinking a hot liquid or while cooking.</li><li>Place hot drinks out of reach of children.</li><li>Reduce the temperature of the water coming out of your taps to 49°C (120°F) or lower.</li><li>Always watch children during bath time. Never leave a child alone in a tub of hot water. Use an anti-scald tap device. The bathwater should be less than 38°C.<br></li><li>Keep appliances and their cords away from the reach of young children. Appliances include irons, kettles and curling irons.<br></li></ul> <span class="asset-image-title">Burn First Aid</span> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kwsiqf-1DzM?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><h2>Source</h2><p>Scalds and burns. Parachute. Retrieved from http://www.parachutecanada.org/injury-topics/item/scalds-and-burns</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/scald_prevention.jpgMain
Vaccines: Concerns about immunizing your childVaccines: Concerns about immunizing your childVaccines: Concerns about immunizing your childVEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2019-07-12T04:00:00Z10.700000000000048.80000000000001264.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Many parents have questions about vaccines. Find information about how many diseases vaccines protect children against in Canada. Also learn about the safety of vaccines and what side effects your child may experience. Finally, learn about how vaccines are given and what you can do to make it less stressful for your child.</p> <p>As a parent, do you have concerns about vaccinating your children? You are not alone. One in three parents in Canada have said they have some minor doubts and concerns about vaccinating their child. For example, in Ontario, the average vaccination rate for seven year olds for measles was 88% for the 2017-18 school year. Areas such as Toronto, however, only had a 74% vaccination rate for measles for seven year olds. The reasons why people choose not to vaccinate their children are complex.</p><p>In addition to all of the questions you might have, you may not be sure what and who to believe or where to get your information. You hear about vaccines from your child’s primary health-care provider, in the media, from friends and family, or by reading information on the Internet. Often, the information seems to conflict.</p> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>All diseases that children are vaccinated against are serious and can cause illness, complications and even death.</li><li>Children who are not vaccinated are at risk in their own communities, when travelling or when infections are brought into the country.</li><li>Vaccines are very safe and thoroughly tested before being approved for use, and most provide over 90% protection against the disease. </li><li>There is a lot of scientific evidence that vaccines do not cause autism and none to support the belief that they do.</li><li>Receiving multiple vaccines at a single time is safe for your child and most side effects are minor and temporary.</li></ul><h2>The truth about vaccines</h2><p>To get the information you need, it is beneficial to have a good relationship and open communication with your child’s health-care provider. <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1144&language=English">Tips for preparing for your child’s visit with their health-care provider</a> include writing down any questions or concerns about vaccines that you have beforehand to make sure you do not forget anything and talking to your health-care provider about what is on your mind.</p><p>Vaccination programs in Canada currently protect children against 15 diseases. In most cases, these vaccines provide over 90% protection against the disease. Globally, vaccination currently prevents two to three million deaths each year.</p><p>All diseases that children are vaccinated against are serious. All vaccine-preventable diseases can cause illness, complications and even death. For example, measles complications include <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=8&language=English">ear infections</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=784&language=English"> pneumonia</a>, and happen in about three out of 10 cases. One to two in every 1,000 cases of measles also result in death. Between one and four babies in Canada die every year from pertussis (whooping cough); and about one in 400 babies who survive pertussis will have permanent brain damage.</p><p>Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable infections continue to happen. When immunization rates drop, more people are likely to get the infection; and what used to be a rare illness can become more common in the population. Vaccine-preventable infections that are uncommon in Canada still occur in other parts of the world. Any child who is not vaccinated is at risk when they are travelling or when infections are brought back to Canada.</p><p>The best protection for a population is when most or all people are fully immunized. The fewer vulnerable people there are in a population, the less chance an infectious disease will have to spread (herd immunity).</p><h2>Safety of vaccines</h2><p>Vaccines are very safe. Before vaccines are approved for use, they are thoroughly tested. They go through many steps to demonstrate they are safe and effective. Even after a vaccine is approved for use, it is still monitored for any possible side effects.</p><p>Most side effects from vaccines are minor and temporary, such as a sore arm or mild fever, and babies are no more likely to get side effects than older children. Because many infectious diseases are more common in babies and young children, delaying vaccines leaves them at higher risk of the diseases and the complications of disease.</p><p>Most vaccines do not have live bacteria or viruses and cannot cause infections. Live vaccines have weakened bacteria or viruses that are unable to cause disease in healthy people. With live weakened vaccines, very rarely, a mild form of infection may occur that is not harmful.</p><p>It is recommended that your baby start to receive their vaccines starting at two months of age. This will help protect your baby as early as possible against diseases such as whooping cough (pertussis).</p><p>It is not better to allow your child to get sick from a disease and acquire natural immunity instead of being vaccinated. Natural infection comes with the risks of serious complications related to that infection. With vaccines, the immune system is stimulated to develop protection against future infection without making your child sick.</p><h3>Vaccines and autism</h3><p>All routine childhood vaccines in Canada use single-dose vials and do not contain preservatives such as thimerosal, with the exception of multi-dose vials of influenza vaccine. Preservatives such as thimerosal are used in multi-dose vials to prevent microbial contamination.</p><p>Vaccines (including the MMR vaccine) do not cause autism. There is no scientific evidence to support the belief that vaccines cause autism, but there is a lot of scientific evidence that shows that vaccines do not cause autism. For example, a study published in March 2019 followed 650,943 children and, again, found no link between the MMR vaccine and autism. The study took into account numerous subgroups of potentially susceptible children and found that the MMR vaccine did not cause autism, nor did it trigger autism in susceptible children.</p><p>Signs of autism sometimes appear around the same age that children receive the MMR vaccine, and some people believed there was a connection between the two. One of the reasons the number of children diagnosed with autism has increased is because children with milder symptoms are now being included in the diagnosis. There is also now more awareness of autism, so more parents are seeking help.</p><h2>Getting a vaccine</h2><p>Getting vaccines can be painful and cause stress for both you and your child. There are things that you can do to reduce the pain of vaccination in your <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=989&language=English">baby</a> or <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=990&language=English">child</a>, such as using numbing creams, comfort positions and distraction techniques.</p><p>Most vaccines are given using a syringe. These syringes are single-use syringes and are not reused. This eliminates any risk of transmitting infections through needles. Some vaccines are given using other methods that also eliminate risk of infection. The rotavirus vaccine is given in a liquid form by mouth, and the flu vaccine can be given using a nasal spray.</p><p>Many vaccines are given in combination, providing protection to your child for several different diseases with just one injection. For example, the MMR vaccine provides protection against measles, mumps and rubella. Getting more than one vaccine at once also means there is no delay in protection, fewer medical visits and fewer needles for your child.</p><p>Your child’s immune system is able to respond to multiple vaccines given at a single time. The immune system produces antibodies that respond to antigens (substances that resemble parts of bacteria or viruses). It is estimated that children are exposed to thousands of antigens every day from the moment they are born. In their first two years of life, if a child gets all of the recommended vaccines, they will only be exposed to about 320 additional antigens through vaccination. Receiving multiple vaccines at a single time that contain a handful of antigens is safe for your child and their immune system.</p><p>For more information on immunization schedules for your child, visit:</p><ul><li><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1986&language=English">Immunization schedule</a> – types of immunizations that are recommended during a child's first year of life and onward.</li><li><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1985&language=English">Immunization "catch-up" for children who have not been fully immunized</a>.</li></ul> <h2>References</h2><p>Caring for Kids. (2016, November). <em>Vaccine safety: Canada’s system</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccine_safety">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccine_safety</a></p><p>Caring for Kids. (2016, November). <em>Vaccines: Common concerns</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccines-common-concerns">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccines-common-concerns</a></p><p>Caring for Kids. (2016, November). <em>Vaccines: Myths and facts</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccines-myths-and-facts">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/vaccines-myths-and-facts</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015). Measles. In Hamborsky, J., Kroger, A., Wolfe, S. (Eds.), <em>Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 13th ed.</em> (pp. 209-30). Washington D.C. Public Health Foundation. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/meas.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/meas.html</a></p><p>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018). <em>Multiple Vaccines and the Immune System</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/multiple-vaccines-immunity.html">https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/multiple-vaccines-immunity.html</a></p><p>EKOS Research Associates. (2018). <em>Survey for the Development of the Childhood Vaccination Campaign Findings Report Prepared for Health Canada</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/301/pwgsc-tpsgc/por-ef/health/2018/022-17-e/report.pdf">http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/301/pwgsc-tpsgc/por-ef/health/2018/022-17-e/report.pdf</a></p><p>Hviid, A., Hansen, J.V., Frisch, M., Melbye, M. (2019). Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination and Autism: A Nationwide Cohort Study. <em>Annals of Internal Medicine</em>, 170, 513–520. doi: <a href="https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2727726/measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination-autism-nationwide-cohort-study">10.7326/M18-2101</a></p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada. (2016, September 1). <em>Canadian Immunization Guide: Part 1 - Key Immunization Information</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/healthy-living/canadian-immunization-guide-part-1-key-immunization-information.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/healthy-living/canadian-immunization-guide-part-1-key-immunization-information.html</a></p><p>Public Health Agency of Canada (2018, October 18). <em>Vaccines for children: Deciding to vaccinate</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/vaccination-children.html">https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/vaccination-children.html</a></p><p>Public Health Ontario (2019, May). <em>Immunization Coverage Report for School Pupils in Ontario: 2017-18 School Year</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/-/media/documents/immunization-coverage-2017-18.pdf">https://www.publichealthontario.ca/-/media/documents/immunization-coverage-2017-18.pdf</a></p><p>Statistics Canada. (2019). <em>Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey, 2017</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/190326/dq190326d-eng.htm">https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/190326/dq190326d-eng.htm</a></p><p>World Health Organization. (2019). <em>Ten threats to global health in 2019</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.who.int/emergencies/ten-threats-to-global-health-in-2019">https://www.who.int/emergencies/ten-threats-to-global-health-in-2019</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Vaccines-Concerns_about_immunizing_your_child.jpgVaccines: Concerns about immunization Learn about the safety of vaccines, their side effects, how they are given, and what they protect your child against.Main

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors