AboutKidsHealth is a health education website for children, youth and their caregivers.

 

 

COVID-19COVID-19COVID-19CEnglishInfectious DiseasesChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NAImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-26T04:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about COVID-19 and how to talk to and support your family. Also find resources such as videos and audio meditations to help you cope.</p><p>This hub includes resources on COVID-19 and how to help you cope. There are resources on how to support your child's mental health and general wellbeing through physical activity, sleep, nutrition and learning. Also included are videos and audio meditations to help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences that occur throughout your day.<br></p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fBkA2ZTUnyI"></iframe> <p>View Dr. Ronni's chat with Dr. Cheddar above.</p></div> <br> <div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">COVID-19 information</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about COVID-19 from AboutKidsHealth.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3872&language=English">Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) </a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html">Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (Public Health Agency of Canada)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3863&language=English">COVID-19: Information for parents of immunocompromised children and children with chronic medical conditions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3870&language=English&hub=COVID-19">COVID-19: Information for parents of children with congenital heart disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages">COVID-19 fact sheets in 34 different languages (Harvard Health Publishing)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/diseases-and-conditions/infectious-diseases/respiratory-diseases/novel-coronavirus/public-resources">COVID-19 public resources (Public Health Ontario)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pcmch.on.ca/covid-19-resources-for-children-youth-and-families/">COVID-19 resources for children, youth, and families (Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/the-2019-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.ontario.ca/page/2019-novel-coronavirus">The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) (Ontario Ministry of Health)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/9Ay4u7OYOhA">6 steps to prevent COVID-19 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Talking to your child about COVID-19</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Helpful resources that provide information about how to explain and talk to your child about COVID-19. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3866&language=English">How to talk to your child about COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="http://hollandbloorview.ca/services/family-workshops-resources/family-resource-centre/explaining-covid-19-kids">Explaining COVID-19 and Coronavirus to children (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-can-we-talk-to-kids-about-covid-19">How can we talk to kids about COVID-19? Be “realistically reassuring” (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-coronavirus#.XmuZ3QV_gax.twitter">How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus (PBS)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3869&language=English">Supporting your child with a neurodevelopmental disorder through the COVID-19 crisis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cmho.org/blog/blog-news/6519918-talking-to-your-anxious-child-about-covid-19">Talking to your anxious child about COVID-19 (Children's Mental Health Ontario)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Information on how to help your child cope with stress during the COVID-19 crisis and how to help them deal with separation from family and friend. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3868&language=English">Coping with separation from family and friends during COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3882&language=English">COVID-19: Frequently asked questions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3883&language=English">COVID-19: Well-being and mental health resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3888&language=English">Stressed adults and anxious young children: Supporting infants, toddlers and preschoolers through COVID-19</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3867&language=English">Is my child or adolescent feeling stressed about COVID-19?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/disaster">Helping children and teens cope with stressful public events (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/how-to-help-youth-tackle-the-blues-during-covid-19">How to help youth tackle the blues during COVID-19 and #physicaldistancing (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://afirm.fpg.unc.edu/supporting-individuals-autism-through-uncertain-times">Supporting individuals with autism through uncertain times (Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Taking care of your mental health during difficult and stressful times is important. Learn more about anxiety and depression.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=18&language=English">Anxiety: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=19&language=English">Depression: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/mental-health-and-covid-19">Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic (CAMH)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Parenting</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some helpful information on parenting during the COVID-19 crisis. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/health_information_on_the_internet">A parent’s guide to health information on the Internet (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/covid-youth-and-substance-use-critical-messages-for-youth-and-families">COVID, youth, and substance use: Critical messages for youth and families (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.cps.ca/en/blog-blogue/parenting-during-covid-19-a-new-frontier">Parenting during COVID-19: A new frontier (Canadian Pediatric Society)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/AboutSickKids/Newsroom/Past-News/2020/joint-statement-school-reopening.html">SickKids - Joint statement on reopening schools</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/sites/default/files/2020-07/HB-BackToSchool-Recommendations.pdf">Return to school recommendations for children with special needs (Holland Bloorview)</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Learning</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=651&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1903&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Reading: How to help early and struggling readers</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3871&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Writing milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1881&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Visual-motor skills: How to foster in children</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=722&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics milestones</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=721&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Mathematics: How to help your pre-school and school-aged child</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=649&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Spatial reasoning skills: How to foster in children</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Well-being</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find out how physical activity, a healthy sleep routine, screen time limits and balanced nutrition can boost your child's mental health and support them to achieve better academic success and help them through difficult times. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Handwashing</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1981&language=English">Hand hygiene</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/handwashing">Handwashing for parents and children (Caring for Kids)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=645&language=English">Sleep: Benefits and recommended amounts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=646&language=English">How to help your child get a good night's sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=647&language=English">How to help your teen get a good night's sleep</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3783&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">Physical activity and mental health: Types of physical activity</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=641&language=English">Physical activity: Benefits of exercise for health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=642&language=English">Physical activity: Guidelines for children and teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=639&language=English">How a balanced diet and healthy eating habits can help your child's mental health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3774&language=English">Nutrition and mental health: Developing positive eating habits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1464&language=English&hub=COVID-19">Meal ideas for school-aged children, tweens and teens</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=638&language=English">Healthy eating for teens</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Screen time and social media</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=643&language=English">Screen time: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3775&language=English">Screen time for teens: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=644&language=English">How to help your child set healthy screen time limits</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3776&language=English">Setting limits and staying safe with screen time</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3894&language=English">Supporting healthy and responsible screen use during COVID-19</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Stress and resilience</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3777&language=English">Stress and health</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3778&language=English">How to become more resilient</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Tools, videos and resources for you and your child</h2></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/8d9SPC7T6KM">After your child's COVID-19 test - Virtual discharge</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20Individual%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020_v2.pdf">CARD: Coping with your own fears and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Anxiety%20caregiver%20handout_Eng%2004_03_2020.pdf">CARD: Helping your child cope with anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBkA2ZTUnyI&feature=youtu.be">Dr. Cheddar chats with Dr. Ronni from SickKids (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nO1L-oYo9TA">Nasopharyngeal (NP) swab (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r51gYrDzpHQ">Physical distancing (video for children)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=7PKwE1jIuws&feature=emb_title">Protect don’t infect (CHEO)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.brainson.org/shows/2020/03/10/understanding-coronavirus-and-how-germs-spread-for-kids?fbclid=IwAR21Y_n6fsy33QD2s07In2Q892xQoI5OEFMMZ5vcMyVoLdkH8tv4yZjaZsc">Understanding coronavirus and how germs spread (Brains On!)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3889&language=English">Virtual care at SickKids</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/">We’re here for you during COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) (Kids Help Phone)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNinywG7BtY">What is personal protective equipment (PPE) (video for children)</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Videos to support sleep and mindfulness</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find videos that will help you prepare for sleep and for when you need a moment of peace, to understand your situation more clearly and coping with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sleep video</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/2fbaoqkY0Qk">Sleep: A bed time story</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness videos</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYcLfBf-T9c">Stress and thinking: The mind/body connection</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Audio meditations for mindfulness and coping</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Listen to these meditations in a quiet, comfortable spot to practise mindfulness, learn about ways to cope with physical and emotional pain or discomfort and to help you with stress throughout your day.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Mindfulness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3cevA6EjCbE">5 senses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/O5F3-Xw2XPE">The mountain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jc64ap852FU">Circle of gratitude</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/LMu-r-KZ_l8">Tree meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Coping with physical and emotional pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/84Tr734KXO8">Dilute the yuck</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/UbTyPgHf8z4">Soften, soothe, allow</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/NN7fz8lMTIM">Ice cube</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/e0JMtabUVvQ">Comfort your pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Finding calm/coping with stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RQJNdVtHxlY">Time for rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/RpHvQkHYrZ0">Allowing rest</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/gqMu6kFfQcE">Dropping the anchor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/CMcx9tJ70rA">Joy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QSf0JS0O16Q">Key word guided meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Tsi2np8xtVY">Bell meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/263e093H5eM">Bell sounds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Jqu3SOEKtvE">Progressive muscle relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/4ilNITE3-fE">Relaxation with imagery</a></li></ol></li></ol></div> <div class="asset-video"> <br> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuU99GGMBBV2N_b2tsRwMx0m"></iframe> <p>Above is our COVID-focused playlist. See "Tools, videos and resources for you and your child" in the menu above for more videos or visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1157093074.jpgCOVID-19,COVID19COVID-19Main
Mental healthMental healthMental healthMEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NALanding Page (Overview)Learning Hub<p>Learn how to support your mental health and well-being and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions, with multimedia resources including articles, animations and guided meditations.<br></p><p>Learn how to support your mental health and well-being and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions, with multimedia resources including articles, animations and guided meditations.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/teen_mentalhealth1.jpgmentalhealthmentalhealth ​Learn how to support your teen’s mental health and wellbeing, and how to recognize and manage various mental health conditions. Teens
Nasal congestion: How to clear your baby's dry, stuffy noseNasal congestion: How to clear your baby's dry, stuffy noseNasal congestion: How to clear your baby's dry, stuffy noseNEnglishNANewborn (0-28 days);Baby (1-12 months)NoseNoseConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Nasal congestion2019-02-04T05:00:00Z6.3000000000000074.70000000000001005.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Some newborns are born with a stuffy nose. Learn why and check out some simple tips for parents on how to clear your baby's stuffy nose.</p><p>In the first few days of life, a newborn may sound like they have a stuffy nose because in the womb they were surrounded by fluid. Sometimes they sneeze for the first couple of days as they try to get rid of this leftover fluid in their nasal passages. A newborn with a stuffy nose may snort when breathing and sound "snuffly."</p><p>Stuffy nose or nasal congestion in babies happens when the tissues inside the nose swell or produce mucus. If your baby has a stuffy nose they may breathe through their mouth, which can make it harder for them to feed. In rare cases, a stuffy nose can cause breathing problems. Usually, nasal congestion goes away on its own within a week.</p><p>Extremely dry air can cause the sensitive lining of a baby's nose to dry up. The blood vessels inside a dry nose may break and bleed. If your baby's nose has not been injured but it bleeds, it may be because of a dry nose. This dryness may also make it easier for a baby to get a cold.</p><p>Nasal dryness often worsens during cold winter months, when heating makes the air inside the home dry.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Newborns may sound like they have a stuffy nose because of leftover fluid in their nose from the womb.</li><li>Usually, newborn stuffy nose goes away on its own within a few days.</li><li>In babies, nasal congestion or stuffy nose happens when the tissues inside the nose swell.</li><li>Use salt water nasal drops or an infant nasal aspirator or suction bulb to help clear mucus from your baby's nose.</li><li>If your baby has trouble breathing, see your doctor right away. </li></ul><h2>What causes stuffy nose in babies?</h2><ul><li>dry air</li><li>irritants such as dust, cigarette smoke, or perfumes</li><li>viral illnesses (such as a cold)</li></ul> <p>Try the measures below to help your baby's dry or stuffy nose. If your baby keeps having difficulty breathing or feeding, check with your baby's doctor to rule out any infection or condition that may be causing the stuffy nose.</p><h2>How to soothe your baby's dry nose</h2><p>If a dry or irritated nose seems to be bothering your baby, try these tips:</p><h3>Moisten your baby's nose</h3><p>You can buy salt water (saline) drops at the drug store.</p><ol><li>Lay your child on their back. Place a rolled towel or a small blanket beneath their shoulders or gently press on the tip of the nose to make it easier for the drops to go in.</li><li>Put two or three saline drops into each nostril. Wait 30 to 60 seconds before draining your baby's nose.</li></ol><h3>Run a humidifier or cool-mist vaporizer near your baby's crib</h3><p>If your baby has a dry nose they may also have a stuffy nose. Water vapor can help moisten and loosen the mucus inside your baby's nose. Clean out and re-fill the vaporizer every day.</p><h2>How to clear your baby's stuffy nose</h2><p>In addition to running a humidifier or vaporizer near your baby's crib, you can also clear the mucus using saline nose drops.</p><h3>Clearing mucus using saline nose drops</h3><ol><li>Lay your child on their back. Place a rolled towel or a small blanket beneath their shoulders or gently press on the tip of the nose to make it easier for the drops to go in.</li><li>Put two or three saline nose drops into each nostril. Wait 30 to 60 seconds.</li><li>Turn your child onto their stomach to help their nose drain. Catch the mucus outside the nostril with a tissue or swab. Your baby might cough or sneeze the mucus and saline out.</li><li>Roll the swab or tissue around the outside of the nostril to draw the fluid out of the nose. Do not insert a cotton swab into your child's nostrils.</li></ol><h3>Clearing mucus using an infant nasal aspirator or nasal suction bulb</h3><p>If you have trouble removing the mucus, try using an infant nasal aspirator or nasal suction bulb. A nasal aspirator is a tube that is placed in your baby’s nostril, while you inhale through the mouthpiece of the tube to draw out any mucus. The mucus is then caught in a filter. A suction bulb is inserted into your baby’s nostril and acts as a vacuum to remove mucus. Suction bulbs are generally less effective in clearing mucous and secretions.</p><p>How to use a nasal aspirator:</p><ol><li>Before the first use, rinse the aspirator with hot water and dry thoroughly.</li><li>Place a clean filter in the filter chamber and reconnect the aspirator.</li><li>Lay the child on their back with their head tilted to the right. Carefully place one to two saline drops into the nostril. Follow the same procedure in the opposite nostril after turning the child’s head to the left.</li><li>Place the nasal aspirator soft tip at the entrance of the baby’s nostril. Inhale through the mouthpiece to gently draw out the mucus. Mucus will be collected in the hygienic filter and cannot pass through the inhalation tube. Repeat in the other nostril. Gently lift the baby to allow any remaining mucus to drain out or their nose.</li><li>Soak a tissue or cotton ball in saline solution and use it to gently wipe the child’s nostrils.</li><li>After each use, unclip the aspirator at its base, remove and discard the used filter, rinse the nasal aspirator with hot water and dry. Do not sterilize or boil the nasal aspirator. </li></ol><p>How to use a nasal suction bulb: </p><ol><li>Pinch the air out of the bulb.</li><li>Gently place the tip into the nostril, just inside the opening. Do not go too deep or you can cause damage to the inner part of the nose. Let the air come back into the bulb, pulling the mucus out of the nose with it.</li><li>Release the mucus onto a tissue.</li><li>Rinse the bulb well with fresh water before and after each use.</li></ol><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0gQqI2gz0Z4?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> </div><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><p>Call your doctor if your child develops any of the following symptoms.</p><ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li><li>Rash</li><li>A stuffy nose together with swelling of the forehead, eyes, side of the nose or cheek</li><li>A stuffy nose that lasts longer than two weeks</li><li>Difficulty breathing or breathing quickly</li><li>Significant trouble feeding or not interested in feeding</li><li>Your baby is extremely fussy or seems to be in pain</li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/nasal_congestion.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />congestedbabycongestedbabyhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/nasal_congestion.jpgNasal congestion in babiesMain
Reading disabilities: OverviewReading disabilities: OverviewReading disabilities: OverviewREnglishDevelopmentalPreschooler (2-4 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);School age child (5-8 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2020-03-03T05:00:00Z11.600000000000039.80000000000001396.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>A reading disability is when a child with age-appropriate intellectual abilities has significant challenges with reading. Learn about reading disabilities, their symptoms, and how they are diagnosed and treated.</p><h2>What is a reading disability?</h2><p>A reading disability is a specific type of <a href="/Article?contentid=653&language=English">learning disability</a>. Children with reading disabilities have average to above average intellectual abilities but experience a lot of trouble with reading. These difficulties affect how they perform in school, and their achievements fall well below what is expected for children of their age, grade, and intellectual ability.</p><p>Reading disabilities may include problems with:</p><ul><li>Phonological processing—the ability to break up words into sounds</li><li>Reading fluency or speed</li><li>Reading comprehension</li></ul><p>A child with a reading disability has a problem with reading words accurately and/or quickly, or with understanding what they are reading.</p><p>Another general term for reading disabilities is <a href="/Article?contentid=307&language=English">dyslexia</a>. Children with dyslexia may have difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition, as well as poor decoding and spelling abilities.</p><h2>Types of reading disabilities</h2><p>In general, there are three types of reading disabilities. A person may experience one, two or all three:</p><ul><li>Problems with phonological processing</li><li>Problems with reading fluency</li><li>Problems with reading comprehension</li></ul><h3>Problems with phonological processing</h3><p>Children with problems in phonological processing have difficulty processing the sounds of language. Phonological processing difficulties include problems with <a href="/Article?contentid=1896&language=English">phonological awareness</a> (rhyming, deleting sounds, blending sounds), phonological memory (remembering sounds in words), and rapid word retrieval (coming up with words or naming objects and symbols quickly). Problems with phonological processing can lead to problems with spelling and to a limited vocabulary, which can also affect a child’s reading comprehension.</p><h3>Problems with reading fluency</h3><p>Reading fluency happens when a reader can recognize many words by sight, and quickly decode unfamiliar words. Reading fluency is important because it gives the reader more time to think about the meaning of a passage or story. Some children can decode and recognize words accurately, but have problems with orthographic processing (remembering the rules of letter order and combinations). These children have difficulty recognizing words they already know and rely heavily on sounding out common words. As a result, it takes a longer time for them to read passages or stories, and they tend to read in a choppy and forced way. Because so much effort is put into reading the words, they also struggle with reading comprehension (the overall meaning of what they are reading).</p><h3>Problems with reading comprehension</h3><p>When a child has difficulty understanding what words mean after reading them, it is called a disability in reading comprehension.</p><p>Children who can read fluently but who still have problems with comprehension often have trouble with:</p><ul><li>Grasping the overall meaning of what they are reading</li><li>Monitoring their understanding</li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Reading disabilities are learning disabilities that can include problems with phonological processing, reading fluency or speed, and reading comprehension.</li><li>Children who are diagnosed with a reading disability often show early signs of speech and language difficulties.</li><li>Reading disabilities are often diagnosed with a psychoeducational assessment.</li><li>Reading disabilities can lead to problems with spelling and limit a child’s vocabulary.</li></ul><h2>Early signs of reading problems</h2><p>Children who are diagnosed with a reading disability often show early signs, such as:</p><ul><li>Indistinct, garbled speech after three years of age</li><li>Speaking in phrases or sentences later than normal</li><li>Difficulty learning words to songs or nursery rhymes in preschool</li><li>Difficulty learning the alphabet and the sounds of the letters</li></ul><p>However, not all children with these signs develop a reading disability.</p><h2>Signs of a reading disability</h2><p>Once your child reaches school age, signs that they might have a reading disability include:</p><ul><li>Trouble learning colour names</li><li>Trouble learning letter names</li><li>Trouble rhyming or isolating sounds in words</li><li>Trouble blending sounds together</li><li>Difficulty recognizing a word after having seen it many times in many different contexts</li><li>Frequent letter or number reversals by the end of Grade Two</li><li>Consistent omission or reversal of letters in words; for example, "gril" instead of "girl"</li><li>Choppy, slow reading</li><li>A limited sight word vocabulary</li></ul><p>For a list of typical reading milestones achieved by children at different grade levels, see <a href="/Article?contentid=651&language=English">Reading and writing milestones</a>.</p><h2>Diagnosis of a reading disability</h2><p>If your child’s reading abilities are substantially below the expected level for their age, intellectual abilities and education, they may have a reading disability.</p><p>If you suspect your child might have a reading disability, it is important to share your concerns with your child’s teachers. They will be able to observe your child’s learning, and identify available resources and strategies to help improve your child’s reading skills. If the resources and strategies provided by the school do not help improve your child’s learning, your child might benefit from a formal psychoeducational assessment.</p><p>A psychoeducational assessment can identify your child’s strengths and learning challenges, and diagnose learning, developmental or attention-related disorders, as well as giftedness. The assessment will get to the root cause of your child’s academic issues, and identify a plan for solving them.</p><h2>Treatment</h2><p>Reading disabilities can be treated with two main approaches—accommodations and interventions.</p><p>The earlier a child with a reading disability receives an evidence-based reading intervention over a reasonable period of time, the more likely they are to catch up with their peers.</p><h3>Accommodations</h3><p>Accommodations are changes made in the classroom to help students work around their weaknesses. Accommodations can help some children succeed without direct intervention. Accommodations for a reading disability might include:</p><ul><li>Providing lessons and presentations on audio recordings</li><li>Providing a designated reader</li><li>Allowing answers and assignments to be given verbally or dictated to a scribe</li><li>Allowing frequent breaks or more time for tests</li><li>Providing a space with minimal distractions</li></ul><h3>Interventions</h3><p>Interventions help students address their areas of need so that they can overcome them. Interventions teach children <strong>how</strong> to learn, and allows them to succeed as independent learners. Interventions for a reading disability typically include addressing the core learning difficulties (speech, language, phonological deficits) through direct instruction. Direct instruction teaches skills in a targeted, well-organized way. Through drills and repetition, it provides children with opportunities for guided practise and cumulative learning.</p><h2>Association with spelling and vocabulary</h2><h3>Spelling problems</h3><p>Spelling is often challenging for children who have a reading disability. Spelling and reading rely on the same underlying knowledge: phonological processing and visual memory. Since many children with reading disabilities struggle with phonological processing, they will also have difficulty breaking down words in order to spell them correctly.</p><h3>Vocabulary problems</h3><p>Vocabulary is important in both learning to read and in reading comprehension. Children develop their reading vocabularies faster when they are reading words more advanced than the words they say when talking. Young children who read well are quickly exposed to all sorts of words that they would not hear when talking to an adult or on television. This exposure helps a child’s reading vocabulary to grow, and it makes it easier for the child to read advanced material.</p><p>Children who struggle with reading lag in vocabulary development because they read less. The feedback between reading vocabulary and comprehension helps to explain why poor readers fall behind in vocabulary and general knowledge. It is important to intervene early, before this performance gap widens.</p><h2>How to help your child with a reading disability</h2><p>Below are some suggestions for how to work with your child at home if they have a reading disability:</p><ul><li>Read to your child above their own reading level, ensuring that their vocabulary and knowledge about the world grows.</li><li>Watch documentaries on TV and discuss them with your child.</li><li>Listen to audio books with your child. You can do this in the car too.</li><li>Read and say rhymes and rhythms aloud with your child.</li><li>Read graphic novels or joke books with your child. These are fun and engaging media that include bite-sized segments of text, which are easier for your child to follow.</li><li>Have conversations with your child about things you have recently read, watched on the news, or discussed with others.</li><li>Have you child read media in the world around them, like signs, labels and recipes.</li><li>Foster curiosity. Wondering about the world helps keep a child’s love of learning from being worn down by frustration.</li><li>Help with your child’s schoolwork plan, agenda and online scheduling platform (e.g., Google Classroom). When are projects due? When do they have a test? What evenings will they study?</li><li>Help your child build non-academic skills, such as athletics, hobbies, music, or group activities.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Reading_disabilities-Overview.jpg A reading disability is a specific type of learning disability. Learn about the symptoms of a reading disability, diagnosis and treatment. Main
Sexuality: What children should learn and whenSexuality: What children should learn and whenSexuality: What children should learn and whenSEnglishAdolescentToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2019-06-06T04:00:00Z10.000000000000052.60000000000001279.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>​​​When you talk to your child about sexuality and reproduction, you want to be sure they understand what you are saying. This guide outlines what children are able to understand at different stages.</p><p>Beginning a conversation about sexuality early and continuing that conversation as the child grows is the best sex education strategy. It lets parents avoid giving one big talk when the child reaches adolescence, when they may think they already have the information and won’t be receptive. When talking to your kids about sex, it’s important to explain things in a way that your child can understand, given their age and level of development. <br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>When talking to your children about sexuality, make sure you explain things in a way that is developmentally appropriate.​</li><li>You do not have to explain everything at once. Younger children tend to be more interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</li></ul><p>Every child is different, but here is a rough guide to what children should be able to understand about sexuality and reproduction at different stages.<br></p><h2>Toddlers: 13 to 24 months<br></h2><p>Toddlers should be able to name all the body parts including the <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/body/interactive?module=sex-development">genitals</a>. Using the correct names for body parts will allow them to better communicate any health issues, injuries or sexual abuse. It also helps them understand that these parts are as normal as any others, which promotes self-confidence and a positive body image. </p><p>Most two-year-olds know the difference between male and female, and can usually figure out if a person is male or female. They should have a general understanding that a person’s gender identity is not determined by their genitals and that gender can be expressed in different ways. Caregivers can help by not connecting sexual biology to gender (e.g., say “people with penises” or “people with vaginas”).</p><p>Toddlers should know that their body is private. It is normal for toddlers to explore their bodies, which includes touching their genitals, but they should understand when and where it is appropriate to do so.</p><h2>Preschoolers: Two to four years old</h2><p>Most preschoolers are able to understand the very basics of reproduction: the sperm and the egg join, and the baby grows in the uterus. Depending on their level of understanding and interest, you might tell children about their birth story and let them know that this isn’t the only way families are made. Do not think you have to cover everything at once. Younger kids are interested in pregnancy and babies, rather than the act of sex.</p><p>Children should understand their body is their own and no one can touch their body without their permission. They should know other people can touch them in some ways but not other ways and that no one should be asking to touch their genitals except for their parents or health-care providers. If they know what is appropriate and what is not, they will be more likely to tell you if they experience sexual abuse.</p><p>By this age, children should also learn to ask before they touch someone else (e.g., hugging, tickling) and should start to learn about boundaries (e.g., understanding that when someone takes a step away, your child should respect that person’s signal for space). </p><p>Teach children about privacy around body issues. For example, they should know when it’s appropriate to be naked. </p><p>Children should also learn more about other body parts and body functions. Some children of this age think that girls only have one opening for stool and urine, and many children believe that babies grow in tummies, the same place their food goes.</p><h2>School-age children: Five to eight years old</h2><p>Children should have a basic understanding that some people are heterosexual, homosexual or bisexual, and that there is a range of gender expression; gender is not determined by a person's genitals. They should also know what the role of sexuality is in relationships.<br></p><p>Children should know about the basic social conventions of privacy, nudity and respect for others in relationships. Most children have begun to explore their bodies by this age. They should understand that while it is normal, it is something that should be done in private.</p><p>Teach children how to use the computer and mobile devices safely. Children toward this age span should start learning about privacy, nudity and respect for others in the digital context. They should be aware of rules for talking to strangers and sharing photos online and what to do if they come across something that makes them uncomfortable.</p><p>Children should be taught the basics about puberty toward the end of this age span, as a number of children will experience some pubertal development before age 10. They should not only learn about the changes they will experience, but about other bodies too — boys and girls should not have separate lessons. Children should also know about the importance of hygiene and self-care in puberty. Having these discussions early will prepare them for the changes that will happen during puberty and will reassure them that these changes are normal and healthy. </p><p>Children’s understanding of <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/body/interactive?module=genetics/inheritanceintroduction/pages/humanreproduction.aspx">human reproduction​</a> should continue. This may include the role of sexual intercourse, but they should also know that there are other means of reproduction. This information could be incorporated into discussions of puberty. </p><h2>Pre-teens: Nine to 12 years old</h2><p>In addition to reinforcing all the things above that they have already learned, pre-teens should be taught about safer sex and contraception and should have basic information about pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). They should know that being a teenager does not mean they have to be sexually active.</p><p>Pre-teens should understand what makes a positive relationship and what makes for a bad one.</p><p>Pre-teens should have increased knowledge of internet safety, including bullying and sexting. They should know the risks of sharing nude or sexually explicit photos of themselves or their peers.</p><p>Pre-teens should also understand how the media influences the way people view their bodies and should be able to think critically about how sexuality is portrayed in the media. This means being able to judge whether depictions of sex and sexuality are true or false, realistic or not, and whether they are positive or negative. </p><h2>Teenagers: 13 to 18 years old</h2><p>Teens should receive more detailed information about menstruation and nocturnal emissions (wet dreams) and should know that they are normal and healthy. They should also know more about pregnancy and STIs and about different contraception options and how to use them to practise safer sex.</p><p>Learning how to practise safer sex also means learning how alcohol and drugs impact judgment.</p><p>Teens should continue learning the difference between a healthy relationship and an unhealthy relationship. This includes learning about pressures and dating violence and understanding what consent means in sexual relationships. Teens should be equipped with negotiation and refusal skills and methods for ending a relationship.</p><p>Teens are generally very private people. However, if parents have spoken to their child early about sex, it increases the chance that teens will approach parents when difficult or dangerous things come up later or when they have questions or concerns about their changing bodies and identities.</p><p>Alberta Health Services (n.d.). <em>Information by age: Understanding your child’s development</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-age/">https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-age/</a></p><p>Alberta Health Services (n.d.). <em>Sexual & gender diversity</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-topic/sexual-diversity/">https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-topic/sexual-diversity/</a></p><p>Alberta Health Services (n.d.). <em>Understanding consent</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-topic/understanding-consent/">https://teachingsexualhealth.ca/parents/information-by-topic/understanding-consent/</a></p><p>Canadian Paediatric Society — Caring for Kids (2017). <em>How to talk with your teen</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/talk_with_your_teen</a></p><p>Canadian Paediatric Society — Caring for Kids (2018). <em>Gender identity</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/gender-identity">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/gender-identity</a><a></a></p> <a> </a> <p>Canadian Paediatric Society — Caring for Kids (2018). <em>Sexual orientation</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/teens_sexual_orientation">https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/teens_sexual_orientation</a></p><p>Planned Parenthood (n.d.). <em>Get the facts on sexual health</em>. Retrieved from: <a href="https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn">https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn</a></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_what_when.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/sex_education_what_when.jpg This guide outlines what children can understand about sexuality and reproduction at different stages. Main
Virtual care at SickKidsVirtual care at SickKidsVirtual care at SickKidsVEnglishNAChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANAAdult (19+) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/katelyn%20ophthalmology%20resized.png2020-09-03T04:00:00Z10.800000000000052.60000000000001500.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about virtual care visits, how to prepare for one and what to expect during a virtual appointment.</p><figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/katelyn%20ophthalmology%20resized.png" alt="A virtual eye appointment from the health-care practitioner's perspective" /></figure> <h2>What is virtual care?</h2><p>Virtual care is a way of providing health care remotely using technology, such as a telephone, computer or other mobile device. A virtual visit with a health-care provider or health-care team can take place over the phone or a video calling platform instead of in-person at the hospital. It provides another option for you to connect with your clinical team when an in-person visit is not available, convenient or safe.</p><p>Virtual care can be a helpful alternative to in-person appointments for non-urgent visits, and during a pandemic such as <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/COVID-19">COVID-19</a>. <strong>Virtual appointments should not be used as substitutes for in-person visits in cases where you/your child need to have a minor procedure, certain types of bloodwork or for emergencies.</strong> Your clinical team will work with you to decide whether your appointment needs to be in person or can be done virtually.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Virtual care is a way of providing health care remotely using technology, such as a telephone, computer or other mobile device.</li><li>You will need a space that is quiet, private, well-lit and comfortable, and a reliable internet and/or phone connection, to attend a virtual care visit.</li><li>Virtual visits can reduce travel to the hospital, minimize wait times and allow for physical distancing of non-urgent hospital appointments.</li><li>Virtual appointments cannot be used as substitutes for emergencies or in-person procedures.</li><li>Your child’s clinical team will provide you with instructions on how to join your virtual visit well in advance of your appointment.</li></ul><h2>What are the benefits of virtual care?</h2><p>Virtual care can be convenient, timely and safe. Appointments done over the phone, computer or a mobile device reduce the need to travel to the hospital and can minimize the wait time for clinic appointments. They also allow for physical distancing during a pandemic like COVID-19.</p><h2>Is virtual care safe?</h2><p>Your privacy is very important to the clinical team. Similar to any in-person visit, they will make it a priority to ensure that any information you give to them during a virtual appointment is kept confidential and secure. Any personal or health information collected during your virtual appointment is used to provide care for your child in accordance with the <em><a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/04p03">Personal Health Information Protection Act</a></em>.</p><p>While the clinical team will do their best to protect the privacy and security of your health information, electronic communications such as email, Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) and Zoom, are never completely secure. There is an increased security risk that your health information may be intercepted or disclosed to third parties when using video or audio communications tools.</p><p>To help the clinical team keep your information safe, it is recommended that you do the following:</p><ul><li>Use your own personal computer or device.</li><li>Use a secure internet connection at home. Avoid using an internet connection in a public area, such as an airport, store, restaurant or library.</li><li>Use your personal e-mail, not a work email address, and make sure the clinical team has your correct email address.</li><li>Choose a private space where your discussions with your provider will not be overheard.</li></ul><p>When participating in virtual care, you will be sharing your child’s personal health information with their clinical team through video or audio communications, which might include email, videoconferencing (Zoom, OTN, etc.) or text messages. If you receive an email or electronic communication and are not sure if it is coming from your child’s clinical team at SickKids, please do not click on any links and contact the clinical team to verify the communication came from SickKids.</p><h2>How much will a virtual visit cost?</h2><p>The hospital does not charge for virtual health-care visits, but your internet or cellular service providers may charge you when you use your own equipment. Contact your internet or cellular service providers to find out if you might incur charges from them. </p><h2>Before your virtual care visit</h2><p>Your child’s clinical team will provide you with instructions on how to join your virtual appointment. You may need to download an app or online platform. The team will provide you this information well in advance of your appointment. It is also helpful to provide your child’s clinical team with a phone number where you can be contacted in case there are technical difficulties.</p><p>There are a few things you can do before your virtual appointment to make sure it goes as smoothly as possible:</p><h3>Be prepared</h3><ul><li>Think about the goals of the appointment and prepare a list of any questions you may want to ask your child’s clinical team.</li><li>Have a notebook and pen available in case you want to write information down during your child’s appointment.</li><li>Ensure your child has had all of their pre-requisite tests and procedures in advance of your virtual visit, if applicable, such as bloodwork or imaging.</li><li>Have your child’s most recent height and weight measurements available. Depending on the type of visit, your child’s clinical team may ask for other measurements as well.</li></ul><h3>Choose an appropriate environment</h3><ul><li>Choose a space that is quiet, has good lighting and is comfortable for you and your child. Turn off the TV, radio, or other sources of noise in advance so that you and your child’s clinical team can hear each other clearly.</li><li>Make sure the space you choose is private. If there are other people in the room with you and your child, tell your child’s clinical team at the beginning of the appointment.</li><li>You may want to have a table nearby in case you want to take notes during the appointment.</li><li>If your child’s clinical team needs to do an assessment of your child during the visit, make sure the space is set up so that your child can either be sitting or lying down comfortably.</li></ul><h3>Have the right technology and equipment on hand</h3><ul><li>Make sure the space you are using has access to the internet and good telephone reception.</li><li>Use a laptop, desktop or tablet with audio and video. Make sure the speakers and microphone work and the volume can be turned up if needed. You may need to attach external speakers or use headphones/ear buds if the volume on your device is not loud enough.</li><li>If you do not have access to a laptop, desktop or tablet, you can try using your smartphone.</li><li>Download any apps needed to for the appointment (e.g., Zoom, Pexip Infinity Connect, etc.) and test the weblink that was provided to you for the appointment.</li><li>Depending on the type of virtual care visit, your child’s clinical team may ask you to have other tools or equipment on hand as well, such as a measuring tape or ruler.</li><li>Test your equipment and audio before your appointment.</li></ul><h2>During your virtual care visit</h2> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Virtual_care.jpg" alt="A virtual appointment from the patient perspective" /></figure> <p>What happens during your child’s virtual care appointment will depend on the clinical care department running the appointment and the reason for your child’s visit. Generally, most appointments will include the following:</p><ul><li>Meeting a member/members of your child’s clinical team to discuss the reason for your child’s appointment</li><ul><li>Just like an in-person visit, there may be more than one member of your child’s clinical team attending your virtual visit. They may all call in to the visit from the same physical location (like a conference room at the hospital), or they may call in separately from different locations (like a home office or private workspace within the hospital).</li></ul><li>Taking a health and/or family history of your child</li><li>Conducting a physical and/or psychological assessment of your child</li><li>Discussing the clinical team’s recommendations and next steps</li><li>A time for you to ask questions</li></ul><h3>What if I require an interpreter?</h3><p>If you require an interpreter during your virtual visit your child’s clinical team will arrange for an interpreter to be present during the appointment.</p><h3>What if I encounter technical difficulties?</h3><p>If you experience technical difficulties during your appointment, please call your child’s clinic at the number they gave you in your appointment instructions.</p><p>Your appointment should start at the scheduled time. If you do not join the meeting shortly after its start time, your child’s clinic will call you on the phone number (or alternate number) that you provided to them in case of technical difficulties.</p><p>You can also try searching for a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page for the app or online platform you are using for troubleshooting tips.</p><h2>After your virtual care visit</h2><p>After your child’s virtual care appointment is concluded you may receive:</p><ul><li>A summary of the visit, including all of the names of the health-care providers on the call, their recommendations and next steps.</li><li>An appointment date for additional tests and procedures, such as bloodwork or imaging.</li><li>An appointment date for a follow-up visit with the clinical care team.</li></ul><p>After Visit Summaries at SickKids are provided through MyChart, an online patient portal that provides patients and authorized caregivers access to parts of their SickKids’ electronic health record. For more information, or to register for MyChart, visit <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/patient-family-resources/mychart/index.html">https://www.sickkids.ca/patient-family-resources/mychart/index.html</a>.</p>virtualcarevirtualcareMain

 

 

Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)Parvovirus infection (fifth disease, erythema infectiosum)PEnglishInfectious DiseasesSchool age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years)SkinImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Fever;Headache;Rash2020-09-02T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000059.1000000000000509.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Parvovirus B19 is a virus that causes fifth disease (slapped cheek syndrome). Learn about the symptoms, causes and treatment of Parvovirus B19.</p><h2>What is Parvovirus B19?</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 is a virus that causes fifth disease or erythema infectiosum. Fifth disease is also known as "slapped cheek syndrome." This is because it causes a red rash on the cheeks. Parvovirus B19 can spread from person to person. It spreads through droplets in the air or on surfaces we touch. </p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Parvovirus B19 infection is a viral infection that is usually mild.</li> <li>People with blood disorders and pregnant women are at risk of complications.</li> <li>Once the rash appears, the child is no longer contagious.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of Parvovirus B19<br></h2> <ul> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">mild fever</a>, chills, headaches and other flu-like symptoms (these usually appear four to 14 days after the virus enters the body, and can last up to three weeks)<br></li> <li>rash that starts after seven to 10 days of symptoms. The rash typically starts on the cheeks, then spreads to the torso and looks red, blotchy and lace-like. The rash then spreads to the arms and the rest of the body<br></li> <li>the rash can be more well-defined after a warm bath (it can be itchy and last from seven to 21 days)</li> <li>joint pain or swelling</li> </ul><h2>Parvovirus B19 spreads before the rash appears</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 is typically spread from person to person when a person with the infection coughs or sneezes. The illness is most likely to spread before the rash appears. After the rash appears, a child is no longer contagious. Your child can attend school while they have the rash. <br></p> <h2>How to help your child with Parvovirus B19<br></h2><p>Offer your child fluids often. This helps to avoid dehydration. Treat fever or pain with <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. </p><p>Because Parvovirus B19 is caused by a virus, antibiotics will not work. There is no effective lotion or medication for the rash. </p><p>Children who are otherwise healthy usually get better after a few weeks. </p><h2>Complications</h2> <p>Parvovirus B19 can make children with immune system problems or blood disorders such as <a href="/Article?contentid=745&language=English">sickle cell disease</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=840&language=English">thalassemia</a> more sick. </p> <p>The virus can spread from a pregnant woman to her unborn child. If this happens, it can lead to severe and life-threatening conditions in the unborn baby.<br></p><h2>You can reduce the risk of getting Parvovirus B19 by:</h2><ul><li>avoiding close contact with people who are sick</li><li>not touching your eyes, nose or mouth</li><li>washing your hands frequently with alcohol-based hand sanitizer or soap and water</li></ul><p>Once you get Parvovirus B19, you have lifelong immunity.</p><h2>When to seek medical assistance</h2><p>Call your child's regular doctor if: </p><ul><li>your child has a blood disorder or a weakened immune system and you are concerned they may have Parvovirus B19 or have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Call your doctor if:</p><ul><li>you are pregnant and have been in contact with someone with Parvovirus B19<br></li></ul><p>Go to the nearest Emergency Department or call 911 if your child:</p><ul><li>is unable to drink or eat and is becoming dehydrated</li><li>has trouble breathing</li><li>becomes very pale, tired or weak</li></ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fifth_disease.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />parvovirusparvovirushttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/fifth_disease.jpgParvovirus infectionMain
Antibiotic-associated diarrheaAntibiotic-associated diarrheaAntibiotic-associated diarrheaAEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Small Intestine;Large Intestine/Colon;RectumStomach;Small intestine;Large intestine;Rectum;AnusConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2015-01-14T05:00:00Z9.5000000000000047.3000000000000577.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Many antibiotics cause diarrhea. Learn about antibiotic-associated diarrhea, including causes and treatment options. </p><h2>What is antibiotic-associated diarrhea?</h2> <p>One in five children who take antibiotics will develop <a href="/Article?contentid=7&language=English">diarrhea</a>. It is more common in children aged under two years and can occur with any type of antibiotic.</p> <p>For most children, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Diarrhea is common in children taking antibiotics. In most cases, it is mild.</li> <li>Children with mild diarrhea should finish their antibiotics.</li> <li>Make sure your child is drinking enough fluids to stay hydrated.</li> <li>Do not give your child any probiotics or medicines unless your doctor recommends them.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea</h2> <p>If a child has antibiotic-associated diarrhea, they will have loose or watery stools while taking antibiotics. Most times, the diarrhea lasts between one and seven days.</p> <p>Diarrhea usually begins between the second and eighth day of taking an antibiotic. Sometimes, however, it can last from the first day of antibiotics until a few weeks after your child finishes them.</p><h2>Causes of antibiotic-associated diarrhea</h2> <p>Inside the intestines are millions of <a href="/Article?contentid=1469&language=English">tiny bacteria </a>that help digest food. When antibiotics kill harmful bacteria that cause infection, they also kill these “good” bacteria. These bacteria cause diarrhea when they die and start growing again in the intestines.</p><h2>Give probiotics or medicines only if your doctor recommends them</h2> <h3>Probiotics</h3> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1990&language=English">Probiotics</a> are supplements with “healthy” bacteria. Studies are looking into whether probiotics can prevent or treat antibiotic-associated diarrhea. So far, this research has not shown any benefit in using them.</p> <p>You may give your child foods that contain probiotics, such as yogurt, but ask your doctor before giving any probiotic supplements.</p> <h3>Medicines</h3> <p>Do not give your child anti-diarrheal medicines such as loperamide unless your doctor tells you to. These medicines can make intestinal inflammation worse.</p><h2>Complications of antibiotic-associated diarrhea</h2> <p>One of the main complications of antibiotic-associated diarrhea is <a href="/Article?contentid=776&language=English">dehydration</a>. This is more likely to occur in babies less than 12 months old. If your child loses a lot of fluids, make sure they drink enough to replace them.</p> <p>Although rare, another complication of antibiotic use is inflammation (pain or swelling) of the large intestine. Signs of inflammation include:</p> <ul> <li>severe diarrhea that may contain blood or mucus</li> <li><a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li> <li>stomach pain</li> <li>extreme weakness.</li> </ul><h2>How to care for a child with antibiotic-associated diarrhea</h2> <h3>Continue the antibiotics</h3> <p>If your child’s diarrhea is mild and your child is otherwise well, continue the antibiotics and care for your child at home.</p> <h3>Keep your child hydrated</h3> <p>Offer your child water often. Do not give fruit juice or soft drinks, as they can make diarrhea worse.</p> <h3>Avoid serving certain foods</h3> <p>Keep giving your child what they normally eat, but do not feed them beans or spicy foods.</p> <h3>Treat diaper rash</h3> <p>If diarrhea causes a <a href="/Article?contentid=26&language=English">rash</a> around your child’s anus or diaper area:</p> <ul> <li>wash the area gently with water</li> <li>pat it dry</li> <li>cover the area with a layer of petroleum jelly, zinc-based cream or other diaper rash cream.</li> </ul><h2>When to see a doctor for antibiotic-associated diarrhea</h2> <p>Call your child’s regular doctor right away if your child:</p> <ul> <li>has severe diarrhea</li> <li>has a new fever</li> <li>has blood in the stool</li> <li>is very tired and not drinking</li> <li>is showing signs of dehydration, such as less urine, crankiness, fatigue and dry mouth</li> </ul> <p>If the diarrhea is severe, your child may need to change antibiotic.</p> <p>Take your child to the nearest Emergency Department or call 911 if they:</p> <ul> <li>have severe pain</li> <li>have a lot of blood in the stool.</li> </ul><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/antibiotic-associated_diarrhea.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/antibiotic-associated_diarrhea.jpgMain
CPR in a child (from age 1 to puberty)CPR in a child (from age 1 to puberty)CPR in a child (from age 1 to puberty): First aidCEnglishNAToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)Heart;LungsHeartNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_chest_compressions_EN.jpg2016-10-17T04:00:00Z7.6000000000000065.8000000000000770.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>CPR is a life-saving technique that combines chest compressions and rescue breaths (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation).<br></p><h2>What is CPR?</h2> <p>CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. CPR is an emergency procedure that involves chest compressions (pushing hard down on the chest) and rescue breaths (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation). When given properly, CPR can help deliver oxygen to the brain and other organs until help arrives or until your child recovers.</p> <p>The method described on this page applies to children between one year of age and puberty. Once puberty has begun, children should receive CPR as adults.</p><p>Causes of cardiac arrest in children and teens are usually a result of a major injury or illness and rarely from underlying heart disease.</p> <h3>Other causes may include: </h3> <ul><li><a href="/Article?contentid=1968&language=English">drowning</a></li> <li>suffocation</li> <li>electrocution</li> <li>poisoning or intoxication</li> <li>life-threatening (<a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English">anaphylactic</a>) allergic reactions</li> </ul> <p>This information can refresh your memory if you have already undergone a CPR course. It does not replace real, hands-on CPR training. CPR courses are often available through local recreation programs, advanced swim programs and first aid programs. In Canada, such programs are offered by the <a href="http://www.redcross.ca/training-and-certification" target="_blank">Canadian Red Cross</a>, <a href="https://resuscitation.heartandstroke.ca/courses/firstaid/sfa?_ga=1.85792092.479256543.1450713783" target="_blank">Heart and Stroke Foundation</a> and <a href="https://www.sja.ca/English/Courses-and-Training/Pages/Course%20Descriptions/CPR-AED-Courses.aspx">St. John Ambulance</a> for example. The basic skills are simple and usually only take a few hours to learn.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Take an official course to learn real, hands-on CPR. </li> <li>CPR involves both chest compressions and rescue breathing (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation). Give 30 compressions and two rescue breaths; repeat this cycle until help arrives or your child recovers.</li> <li>If your child is unresponsive and not breathing or only gasping despite stimulation, start CPR right away and have someone else call 911.</li> <li>Once your child starts breathing, put them in the recovery position. This will keep their airway open.</li> </ul><h2>Giving CPR to your child</h2><p>Check to see if your child is responsive by tapping them on the shoulder and asking loudly, “Are you OK?”. If your child does not answer, follow these instructions depending on your situation:<br></p><ul><li>If you are not alone, have someone else call 911 and get an AED (automated external defibrillator) right away, if available, while you are doing CPR. </li><li>If you are alone and have a cell phone, start CPR while calling 911 from your cell phone on speaker. After two minutes of CPR (five cycles), go get an AED if available.</li><li>If you are alone and have no cell phone, start CPR for two minutes (five cycles) and then call 911 from a landline and get an AED if available.</li></ul><ol class="akh-steps"><li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_chest_compressions_EN.jpg" alt="Positioning child for CPR chest compressions" /> </figure> <h2>Chest compressions: Push hard, push fast</h2><p>Begin CPR by laying your child down on a firm, flat surface. Do not spend time trying to find a pulse. Place the heel of one or two hands over the lower third of your child's breastbone and give them 30 quick chest compressions (push fast). Be sure to push hard enough so their chest moves approximately 5 cm (2 inches) down (push hard). </p><p>Count out loud. You should deliver about 100-120 compressions a minute. Wait for the chest to come all the way back to its initial position between compressions. This will get the blood flowing to your child's brain and other vital organs.</p></li><li> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_open_airway_EN.jpg" alt="Opening child's airway for rescue breaths" /> </figure> <h2>Rescue breaths: Open the airway</h2><p>After the first 30 chest compressions, place the palm of your hand on your child’s forehead. Place two fingers on the hard, bony tip of their chin and gently tilt their neck back. This will open your child's airway. </p></li><li> <figure><img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_breathe_airway_EN.jpg" alt="Giving child CPR rescue breaths" /> </figure> <h2>Two rescue breaths </h2><p>Pinch your child's nose and place your mouth over their mouth and give two breaths. Each breath should be just enough to make your child’s chest rise and should be no more than one second in length. Make sure you see your child's chest rise with each breath. </p></li><li> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_chest_compressions_EN.jpg" alt="Repeating CPR chest compressions" /> </figure> <h2>Repeat </h2><p>Give cycles of 30 chest compressions and two breaths during two minutes and repeat until the ambulance arrives or your child starts breathing again. Two minutes usually allow for five cycles of 30 chest compressions and two breaths.</p><p>A two-minute CPR cycle is usually tiring. If you are not alone, switch who is giving CPR every two minutes.</p></li><li> <figure class="”asset-c-100”"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_CPR_child_recovery_position_EN.jpg" alt="Putting child in recovery position" /> </figure> <h2>Recovery position</h2><p>Once your child has recovered and started breathing again on their own, put them in the <a href="/Article?contentid=1037&language=English">recovery position</a> until help arrives. The recovery position will help keep your child’s airway open and prevent them from choking on their own vomit. If your child vomits, wipe it away. Make sure nothing is blocking or covering their mouth and nose. </p></li></ol><br>​​​​<p>The <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/" target="_blank">Hospital for Sick Children​</a> offers the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s <a href="http://www.cvent.com/events/hospital-for-sick-children-standard-first-aid-heart-stroke-foundation-/event-summary-d989cebc9ab14e1281c6db68ab161d7c.aspx" target="_blank">First Aid program​</a>. It provides CPR and resuscitation training for patients, families and the general public.​</p>Main
DiabetesDiabetesDiabetesDEnglishEndocrinologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)PancreasPancreasConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2018-01-19T05:00:00Z000Landing PageLearning Hub<p>This resource contains information, illustrations and animations to help you understand diabetes, from symptom recognition, to diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcomes. Learn about managing and living with diabetes on a daily basis.</p><p>This resource contains information about diabetes, from symptom recognition, to diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcomes. Learn about managing and living with diabetes on a daily basis. Throughout the resource you will find many illustrations and animations to help you understand the condition, its management and long-term consequences.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">What is diabetes?</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when the body is not able to use sugar as energy. Find out more about the different types of diabetes and their causes such as genetic factors, environmental events, diseases or medications.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1717&language=English">What is diabetes?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1718&language=English">Types of diabetes</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Type 1 diabetes</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1719&language=English">Type 1 diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1720&language=English">Management of type 1 diabetes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Type 2 diabetes</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1721&language=English">Type 2 diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1722&language=English">Management of type 2 diabetes</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Balancing blood sugar levels</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Diabetes management requires balancing the amount of sugar that enters the body through food with physical activity and potential diabetes medication. Learn about monitoring and controlling of blood sugar levels in this section.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1723&language=English">Balancing blood sugar levels</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1724&language=English">Measuring blood sugar levels</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1725&language=English">Monitoring blood sugar levels</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1726&language=English">Handling high and low blood sugar levels</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1727&language=English">Diabetic ketoacidosis</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Insulin in diabetes management</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Some children with diabetes need insulin to help manage their condition. Insulin is a chemical messenger (hormone) that helps the body use sugar as energy. Learn more about the different types of insulins and injection devices to deliver it.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1728&language=English">Insulin in diabetes management</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Understanding insulin</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1729&language=English">Understanding insulin</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1730&language=English">Buying and storing insulin</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Insulin injections</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1731&language=English">Insulin injections</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1732&language=English">Pens and cartridges</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1733&language=English">Insulin pumps</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1734&language=English">Other devices for insulin injections</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1735&language=English">Selecting the injection site</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Insulin regimen</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1736&language=English">The insulin regimen</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1737&language=English">Changing insulin requirements</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1738&language=English">Insulin dose adjustment on a multiple daily routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3021&language=English">Insulin dose adjustment on a TID or BID insulin routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3022&language=English">Insulin dose adjustment when using an insulin pump</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Questions</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1739&language=English">Tips and questions about insulin</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Maintaining a healthy diet</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Keeping a healthy diet benefits everyone, not only children with diabetes. This section will help you understand what foods hide sugar, plan meals and snacks, and integrate this new diet in your family’s daily life.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1740&language=English">Maintaining a healthy diet</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1741&language=English">Meal planning for children with diabetes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>The meal plan</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1742&language=English">Setting up the meal plan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1743&language=English">Meal planning with consistent carbohydrate intakes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1744&language=English">Meal planning with changing carbohydrate intakes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Management</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1745&language=English">Avoiding high and low blood sugar episodes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1746&language=English">The glycemic index</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1747&language=English">Eating out and special occasions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1748&language=English">Food issues at different ages</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Adjusting to illness and activity</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Changes in your child’s routine can disturb their blood sugar levels and contribute to health issues. Illness, which increases stress, and exercise, which speeds up insulin activity, can contribute to rocketing or dropping blood sugar levels.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1749&language=English">Adjusting to illness and activity</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Sick day</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1750&language=English">Diabetes and sick day management</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1751&language=English">Insulin injection management during illness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1752&language=English">Sick days and insulin pumps</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Exercise</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1753&language=English">Diabetes and exercise</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Hemoglobin A1c</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The hemoglobin A1c test (also called A1c test) measures the average blood sugar level over a three-month period. It can tell you how well your child’s blood sugar levels are overall controlled.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1754&language=English">Hemoglobin A1c</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=1755&language=English">What is a good A1c reading?</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Living with diabetes</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Diabetes can affect your child's life at home, at school and on vacation. With effective management and support your child should be able to participate in many of the same activities as other children or teenagers their age.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2509&language=English">Living with diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2510&language=English">Effective management of diabetes care at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2511&language=English">The diabetes team</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Growth and development</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2512&language=English">Growth and development</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2513&language=English">Infants, toddlers and preschoolers with diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2514&language=English">School-aged children with diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2515&language=English">Teenagers with diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2516&language=English">Thrill-seeking and risky behaviour in teenagers</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Management</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2517&language=English">Diabetes in the classroom</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2518&language=English">Diabetes and vacations</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Looking ahead</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2519&language=English">Transitioning to adult health care</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Complications of diabetes</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Diabetes can lead to health complications such as eye disease, kidney problems or thyroid problems. Controlling blood sugar levels and eating well can help prevent complications.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2520&language=English">Complications of diabetes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Complications</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2521&language=English">Screening for complications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2522&language=English">Eye damage and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2523&language=English">Kidney disease and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2524&language=English">Other late effects of diabetes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Related conditions</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2525&language=English">Screening for related conditions to diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2526&language=English">Thyroid diseases and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2527&language=English">Celiac disease and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2528&language=English">Addison's disease and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2529&language=English">Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2530&language=English">Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and diabetes</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Looking ahead</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2531&language=English">Setting the stage for a healthy future</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Resources</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find some additional resources to help you manage your child’s diabetes. Find additional information about the importance of nutrition, physical activity, mental health, sleep and more.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://meant2prevent.ca/">Meant2Prevent</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/diabetes_learning_hub.jpgdiabetesdiabetesDiabetes Awareness Month November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Learn about how to help your child manage and live with diabetes day-to-day.Main
PneumoniaPneumoniaPneumoniaPEnglishRespiratoryChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsLungsConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)Abdominal pain;Cough;Fever;Vomiting2013-11-28T05:00:00Z7.0000000000000065.9000000000000624.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs and lower respiratory tract. Learn about the signs and symptoms and how to take care of your child. </p><h2>What is pneumonia?</h2><p>Pneumonia is an infection in the lungs. It may also be called a lower respiratory tract infection. Most cases of pneumonia are caused by viruses in children age three and younger. In older children and teenagers, most cases of pneumonia are caused by bacterial infections. A child could start out by having a viral pneumonia which then becomes complicated by a bacterial pneumonia.</p> <figure class="asset-c-100"><span class="asset-image-title">Pneumonia</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Pneumonia_XRAY_MEDIMG_PHO_EN.png" alt="An x-ray of normal left and right lungs and an x-ray of lungs with pneumonia in the right side" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">In the lung with pneumonia, the affected part of the lung will appear white in a chest X-ray. The white shadow is caused by fluid in the lung's air sacs.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Pneumonia is an infection deep in the lungs. It can be caused by viruses or bacteria.</li> <li>If your child is given antibiotics, be sure to finish all of them, even if your child is feeling better.</li> <li>Keep your child comfortable and give them lots of fluids.</li> </ul><h2>Signs and symptoms of pneumonia</h2><p>Pneumonia symptoms can vary greatly in children. Common signs and symptoms of pneumonia include:</p><ul><li>high and/or persistent <a href="/Article?contentid=30&language=English">fever</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=774&language=English">cough</a></li><li>fast breathing</li><li>trouble breathing</li><li>crackly noises in the lung</li><li>loss of appetite</li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=746&language=English">vomiting</a> due to the cough or from swallowing mucus</li><li>feeling unwell</li><li>abdominal (belly) pain or chest pain</li></ul> ​<h2>What your doctor can do for pneumonia</h2> <p>Your doctor will listen to your child's lungs with the stethoscope and observe your child's breathing. If your doctor suspects pneumonia, your child may have a <a href="/article?contentid=1647&language=English">chest X-ray</a> to see what your child's lungs look like. Viral pneumonia does not need antibiotic treatment. If your doctor suspects a bacterial infection as a cause of the pneumonia, then your doctor will prescribe antibiotics. Your child's doctor will look at many factors before deciding the best treatment.</p><h2>Taking care of your child at home</h2> <h3>Finish all antibiotics</h3> <p>If your child was given antibiotics, they must finish all the pills or liquid, even if they are feeling better. This is important to prevent the infection from coming back and to decrease the chance of antibiotic resistance.</p> <h3>Monitor and treat the fever</h3> <p>To treat the fever or achy muscles, use <a href="/Article?contentid=62&language=English">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=153&language=English">ibuprofen</a>. You can give these medicines even if you child is also on antibiotics. They do not interact. DO NOT give your child <a href="/Article?contentid=77&language=English">acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)</a>.</p> <h3>Keep your child fed and hydrated.</h3> <p>Make sure your child drinks plenty of fluids to stay <a href="/Article?contentid=776&language=English">hydrated</a>. Your child may not want to eat much at first. Once the infection begins to clear and your child starts to feel better, they will want to eat more.</p> <h3>Avoid smoky places</h3> <p>Keep your child away from smoke and other lung irritants.</p> <h3>Cough symptoms</h3> <p>Your child's cough may get worse before it gets better. As the pneumonia goes away, your child will cough to get rid of the mucus. The cough may continue for two to three weeks.</p><h2>When to see a doctor</h2><h3>See your child's regular doctor if:</h3><ul><li>Your child's cough lasts for more than three to four days and is not improving</li><li>Your child has a fever for more than two to three days</li><li>Your child's fever lasts more than three days after starting antibiotics<br></li></ul><h3>Take your child to the nearest Emergency Department, or call 911 if your child:</h3><ul><li>has difficulty breathing</li><li>becomes very pale or blue in the lips</li><li>vomits antibiotic doses or will not take fluid</li><li>appears more sick<br></li></ul><h2>Hospital admission if needed</h2><p>Most children can be cared for at home. Very sick children may need to go to the hospital. They may need oxygen and other medicines. They may need antibiotics given intravenously (into a vein) at first, and then by mouth as they get better.</p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/pneumonia.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />pneumoniapneumoniahttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/pneumonia.jpgMain